TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Samsung’

Former Apple Exec Thinks the Company’s PR Strategy Is All Wrong

Over the last few weeks, we’ve posted several stories about Apple‘s newer, more aggressive PR strategy in the post-Jobs era. Not only is the tech giant focused on pushing its own products; it’s also giving its executives more leeway to take shots at rivals like Samsung as they see fit.

Jean-Louise Gassée worked for Apple throughout the 80′s as the head of its French division and later directed Macintosh product development before leaving due to strategic differences with other executives. On Sunday he posted an op-ed on the Monday Notes tech blog with the ominous headline “Apple Is Losing the War–of Words“. Gassée‘s conclusion will surprise many in the tech world, because he thinks the Apple PR team should take a few cues from Microsoft and hire an outside firm better versed in the art of “verbal warfare.”

Wait, what? Let’s explore this a little further, shall we?

Read more

Apple Exec Bitch Slaps Samsung Before Galaxy S4 Debut

“Once you spend time with the Galaxy S4, I’m very confident you’ll find how its innovations make your life simple and fuller.”

OK, so Samsung president JK Shin tends to exaggerate a bit. In case you missed it, yesterday’s big tech news concerned the debut of the Samsung Galaxy S4, the company’s latest volley in the ongoing marketing war between Samsung and Apple, the world’s biggest smartphone companies.

We agree that features like the “SmartScroll“, which detects when a user is looking at the phone and responds accordingly, are very cool. But from a PR perspective we’re more interested in Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller‘s decision to make the media rounds and slam his competitor before yesterday’s product rollout. Frankly, we see this as a bad sign for Apple.

Read more

Can Alexander Wang Make Samsung as Fashionable as Apple?

Apple‘s latest PR push and disappointing iPhone 5 sales have led some to wonder: Is Steve Jobs‘s baby no longer the king of all things cool? Have Samsung and Microsoft somehow managed to knock the reigning tech nerds off their perch?

We wouldn’t go that far, but it’s clear that Apple’s cheaper, less fashionable competitors are upping their game. This week, for example, Samsung officially launched a Galaxy promo campaign designed to combine several untouchably cool elements: New York Fashion Week, crowdsourcing and red-hot designer/Balenciaga creative director Alexander Wang. The campaign’s first video spot, released yesterday and titled “Be Creative”, shows Wang using his Galaxy Note II to do just that:

Read more

Edelman Switches Sides, Joins the ‘Paid Content’ Team

Edelman PRIn a sign of the (changing) times, yesterday saw Richard Edelman, president and CEO of Edelman PR, perform something of an about-face on an issue crucial to our industry’s ongoing “PR vs. Advertising” debate. In a blog post on the firm’s site, Edelman declared his newfound (if somewhat grudging) support for “paid” media/content as a valuable element of the PR arsenal.

Why did he change his mind? What led him to accept the idea that PR professionals must simultaneously pitch and create content? In short, promotional trends like sponsored stories and native advertising have changed the media game as companies scramble to develop new revenue streams to replace the dwindling profits of traditional advertising sales.

We’ve all read stories asserting the same, but recent months have clarified the fact that PR firms must aggressively make the most of the shift or risk losing opportunities to “media buying firms” that work directly with brands in another iteration of the traditional advertiser/client relationship.

Read more

Samsung Hires ‘Overly Attached Girlfriend’ to Sell Hard Drives

Nothing puts the fickle, unpredictable and compelling nature of public opinion into perspective quite like the online celebrity phenomenon. Together we scour YouTube and pluck people from obscurity, elevating them to a state of international fame that is both instant and ephemeral. From the cute and the quirky to the talented and the straight-up freakish, the public loves online celebrities.

Now Samsung hopes to leverage the power of this phenomenon by recruiting one Laina. She’s famous for her “Overly Attached Girlfriend” videos–you know, the ones where she and her wacky eyes convey an unsettling but hilarious message to an undisclosed boyfriend. The videos have accumulated 13 million views to date, so something about her gag clearly connects with the public.

Online celebrities are, of course, a little different than your traditional stars. They were just like us mere moments ago– regular people sitting in their regular bedrooms beside their regular closets. The thought can be a little inspiring.

We say Samsung made a wise move by hiring Laina to sell its SSD840 drive, thereby demonstrating its sense of humor and its awareness of the fact that memes=marketing gold. Remember that McKayla Maroney had a meme–and she was a world-class athlete who won a gold medal at the summer Olympics.

Laina is just another one of your friend’s funny sisters.

Spin the Agencies of Record

Samsung, currently focusing on its global b-to-b marketing strategy,  added two new shops to manage advertising responsibilities. Samsung chose WPP, which will create a team specifically to handle the account; the company also selected Publicis Groupe-owned Razorfish as its new digital agency of record in an unrelated deal.

Brian Wallace, Samsung’s VP of marketing, explains, “We picked Razorfish as our digital AOR because they demonstrate the innovative thinking that we value in our agencies. We know Razorfish understands how to translate complex issues into unique and engaging customer experiences.”

Rubenstein Public Relations also announced new client wins including World Business Lenders, FiREapps and Mr. Omer Ozden. CEO Richard Rubenstein said, “Representing these leaders in the finance and real estate markets underscores our continued expansion into the business, financial and real estate public relations sectors. We are increasingly assisting more clients in elevating their profiles and business strategies by securing strategic, brand-building media coverage.”

After a lengthy review, Sears Holdings decided to retain Havas’ MPG as its top media agency. The decision means that the national marketing juggernaut, which spends heavily on advertising, will continue its relationship with MPG, which began in 2007. It also means that MPG will retain one of its most important accounts, which includes the Kmart and Sears brands.

Will the Public Tire of Apple’s Endless Product Rollout?

Here we go again. Apple launches yet another highly-anticipated product amid a media whirlwind/ hype machine set to whip up the public like a bowl of meringue. And it works. Every time.

This time, as we’re sure you know, it’s the iPad Mini, released this week to combat the Friday debut of Microsoft’s Surface tablet and its brand-new Windows 8 operating system.

OK, even the most committed technophile reaches a saturation point. Nothing in life can be completely new and revolutionary and hype-worthy all the time, and while Apple’s success is well-deserved, we can’t help but wonder just when the working public will tire of these $500 “upgrades.”

As PR professionals, however, we do know that whenever super-CEO Tim Cook feels the need to apologize for poor decisions like omitting Google Maps from the iPhone 5 and creating a terrible app to replace it, the public takes notice. So the brand must tread carefully with regard to the public’s trust, good will, and willingness to get excited about something “new.” Need we remind you that many Americans are still just scraping by? Read more

Spotify Isn’t Making Any Money

Chances are you’re familiar with Spotify. You’ve probably even used it a few times—and if you registered you’ve almost certainly started seeing status updates every single time one of your friends listens to a damn song! Wow that’s annoying. (All you have to do to stop that nonsense is change the settings on your account, but we digress.)

Spotify is a pretty cool service in some ways. It’s given us a chance to access obscure music whenever we want without buying anything; we just have to either pony up a paltry $9.99 a month or listen to some stupid ads between every two or three tracks. And we don’t have to feel guilty about using it because we’re not stealing the music we hear. All good, right?

Not really. The problem is that, despite the Facebook bromance and potential relationships with big-name sponsors like Coca-Cola and Samsung, Spotify’s business model doesn’t seem to be working. In fact, their net income for 2011 was negative $60 million. That’s a whole lot of iTunes downloads, guys.

The funny thing is that the main factor dragging the company’s earnings down is the cost of royalties—in spite of the fact that the artists and labels who produced the music in question make less than 5/1000 of a penny for each play—less than any other comparable service.

Our question: Why is Spotify Premium so cheap in the first place? Wouldn’t most hardcore music fans pay more than 10 bucks a month for unlimited streaming content?

Does Spotify need a re-branding or what?

Can the ‘iPad Mini’ Make up for Apple Maps?

Thanks to Interbrand and common sense, we now know that Apple is the No. 2 most valuable brand in the world—and its profile is rising faster than that of any other company.

Yet, in the wake of disappointing iPhone 5 sales numbers and the whole Apple Maps debacle, some have begun to wonder whether CEO Tim Cook is strong enough to sustain his company’s incredible upward trajectory.

We may find out soon enough with Apple’s latest product roll-out: the iPad mini. Details about the model are still vague, but if we didn’t know better we might say that Apple is playing the classic “show ‘em the carrot” PR game by leaking news about their newest digital accessory, encouraging rumors to build in the tech world and getting ahead of chief rival Samsung’s mini-Galaxy S III roll-out.

How important will the iPad mini be? Will it distract the public (and the ravenous tech blog community) from Apple’s recent PR stumbles?

Don’t Cry for Samsung. It’s Doing Fine.

PR is a tricky art—sometimes what looks like a big win turns out to be anything but, and companies that seem to be stuck in the PR doghouse may actually be doing much better than they appear.

There’s no doubt that the last few weeks have brought a string of negative news for Samsung, the world’s largest electronics manufacturer. The latest development in the ongoing Apple vs. Samsung fight indicates that the company’s biggest iRival isn’t happy to leave a mere flesh wound. After winning the big copyright suit, the Silicon Valley tech god’s reps filed a motion on Friday to ban the sale of each offending product in the US—and they’d also like an extra $700 million in damages just to round things out.

Sounds like Apple has Samsung down for the count, right? And no one, not even the company’s own representatives, has tried to argue that it makes the more innovative, higher-quality products.

Here’s the thing, though: Samsung is doing just fine despite all this noise. In fact, it’s doing better than ever.

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>