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The Goal of Rebecca Black’s ‘Friday’ Was to ‘Stick in People’s Heads’

By now, you’ve likely heard 13-year-old Rebecca Black‘s little ditty “Friday.” Maybe you’ve even disliked it on YouTube; it just surpassed Justin Bieber‘s “Baby” as the most disliked video on the site with more than 1.2 million giving it the thumbs down. But the man behind the song doesn’t care one lick. He didn’t make the song so you would like it.

“Yeah, people didn’t like the song, didn’t like the music video, they thought it was really cheesy. But that was the whole point, to create something that was really simple but something that sticks in people’s head. To have people say ‘I hate this song, but I’m still singing it,’” Ark Music Factory CEO Patrice Wilson told Gawker. That’s probably what The Beatles were thinking.

As a result of Black’s infamy, Wilson, who has worked as a model and starred in a movie with Snoop Dogg, has made appearances on Good Morning America and The Tonight Show With Jay Leno.

Wilson thinks because “Friday” has been so successful — Rolling Stone says the song is number 38 on the Billboard chart and sold 50,000 copies in the past week — despite its humble beginnings with an independent company, it will be “historical.”  (For $2,000 to $4,000, Ark will create the song, a video, and arrange for a session with an “image consultant.”)

Still he doesn’t recommend the fast path to stardom that Black has taken.

“If you’re going to get famous, enjoy doing it yourself and try to get positive feedback and not all the negativity right away,” Wilson told Gawker. “We can’t control that, but someone should get famous step by step; you put out music and get feedback and eventually get noticed by a record company—that’s the right way.”

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