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Posts Tagged ‘Ben Wedeman’

Rare Get-together for CNN’s Foreign Correspondents as They Reflect on 2011

CNN’s Anderson Cooper hosts a year end special with CNN’s foreign correspondents, including (l-r) Ben Wedeman, Arwa Damon and Nic Robertson

It’s a good thing today was a relatively quite international news day because most of CNN’s foreign correspondents were gathered in New York talking about about the incredible year that was. From the Arab Spring to the triple tragedy in Japan, reporters Nic Robertson, Ben Wedeman, Arwa Damon, Hala Gorani, Matthew Chance, Sara Sidner, Kyung Lah and Ivan Watson crowded into Piers Morgan‘s studio at Time Warner Center where Anderson Cooper, who’s also reported from many of the world’s hotspots this year, lead the discussion.

CNN International EVP Tony Maddox tells TVNewser the get-together, which happens once every few years, “was the greatest gathering of foreign journalists on the planet.”

Before the taping we asked Robertson what is his most remarkable moment of this remarkable year. Robertson, who started as an engineer with CNN in 1990, says it was the uprising in Bahrain in February. “We were approaching Pearl Square and all hell was breaking loose.” Robertson used his iPhone to report live on CNN. Later, as he was rushed out of the area, he used the phone to record more video and his audio for a package that was edited in Atlanta. “That’s a far cry from 36 boxes of equipment we used to use,” added CNN EVP Ken Jautz

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Ben Wedeman and CNN Crew Caught in Libyan Firefight

CNN senior international correspondent Ben Wedeman was reporting from Libya yesterday when a firefight broke out around them, in the village of Qawalish. Gunshots can be heard on the dramatic video as Wedeman and his crew jumped back into their cars and sped away. The CNN team was all safe, but Wedeman Tweeted yesterday that the battle left eight dead and 27 others wounded.

Watch the video here:

Libyan Military Nearly Bombs CNN Crew

A scary moment in Libra yesterday,as CNN correspondent Ben Wedeman and his crew were nearly bombed by the Libyan military.

Wedeman was speaking to anti-Gaddafi forces in Brega, and a Libyan Air Force jet dropped a bomb just a few hundred feet from where they were standing:

Wedeman and crew are alright, although there some injuries to others nearby.

CNN’s Ben Wedeman Reports from Inside Libya

CNN’s Cairo bureau chief Ben Wedeman has made it into Libya — the first western TV journalist to report from inside the nation as it descends into chaos.¬†Wedeman began reporting by phone on “The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer” at 6pmET. He’s been doing phone reports since during CNN’s primetime.

“Libyan side of border controlled by untrained volunteers armed with shotguns, Ak-47s. No passport formalities,” writes Wedeman on Twitter (@bencnn). He also got this advice:

Driver advice: “If you’re stopped by forces loyal to Qaddafi, tell them you’re a German doctor.” #Libya

Cameras Continue to Roll as Situation in Cairo Deteriorates Rapidly

As a cameraman trained his lens from a Cairo high-rise, NBC News anchor Brian Williams and chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel gave a play-by-play of what was happening below. The scene, adjacent to the frontlines of a battle between protesters and pro-Mubarak forces outside the Egyptian Museum, showed a pickup truck with its driver having been pulled out of the front seat, kicked, beaten, then put in the bed of the pickup.

It’s 4:55 in the morning in Cairo, and Williams and Engel are describing just another incident in the increasingly deteriorating situation in the Egyptian capital.

Williams and Engel began this evening’s coverage during “The Rachel Maddow Show” and continued into “The Ed Show” at 10pmET. When Ed Schultz asked Williams about their safety, Williams said no one was interested in the American TV crew looking on, “We’re absolutely almost, perversely safe looking over this gunfire,” he said.

Anderson Cooper, one of several TV correspondents roughed up by protesters today, anchored his show crouched low, with just a few lights, along with CNNI anchor Hala Gorani and correspondent Ben Wedeman as Ivan Watson phoned in from nearby Tahrir Square. “This is not exactly how we planned to bring you tonight’s program,” said Cooper. “But the situation changes here minute by minute in Cairo. We’ve been advised to turn down our lights, get down on the floor and try to barricade ourselves in the area we’re in. So that’s why we’re doing this program like this tonight. It’s not going to look very good over the next hour, but bear with us.”

TV News Reporters Roughed Up, Caught in the Midst of Violent Protests in Egypt

Anderson Cooper is not the only reporter in Egypt finding it increasingly difficult to cover the escalating violent protests today (video after the jump).

CBS News correspondent Mark Strassmann wrote¬† about the protests he’s covering:

“My colleague’s small camera was in his pocket, but we stood out as Americans. People began pushing and shoving both of us, especially him. We’ve been in these situations enough to know you just try to get out as quickly as you can. But we were trapped. From behind, I saw him get pushed and shoved, and then three separate people ran up to throw punches at him as he ducked to get out of the melee. He later told me he had also been maced.”

ABC’s Christiane Amanpour wrote in her “Reporter’s Notebook” today:

An angry mob surrounded us and chased us into the car shouting that they hate America. They kicked in the car doors and broke our windshield as we drove away.

Reporters in the area are turning to Twitter to report some of their stories today. Their Tweets after the jump…

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CNN’s Ben Wedeman in Cairo, Egypt: ‘Life is coming to a crashing standstill’

CNN’s Ben Wedeman has been with CNN since 1994, and has been based in the Middle East ever since. The CNN reporter spoke about the story from Egypt on Monday: “I’m trying to sort of focus on this story that I’ve been working on for years, and at the same time making sure my family is feeling safe.”

Networks, Cablers Rush to Cover Egypt Clashes

There is chaos in Egypt, as protesters are facing off against the police in a number of major cities, including Cairo and Alexandria. Egyptian President Mubarak has instituted a nationwide curfew, but it does not appear to be working.

The broadcast news divisions, as well as all three cable networks are covering the situation, with plans to continue coverage through the weekend.

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