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Social Media

KABC Passes 600,000 Facebook Likes

KABC LOGO_304X200KABC has surpassed 600,000 Facebook likes, making it the most-liked Facebook page among all local stations in the U.S., according to the Los Angeles ABC O&O.

“The ABC7 Facebook fans continue to see our page as an important destination for news, information, discussion and sometimes a little fun,” KABC vice president and news director Cheryl Fair said in a statement. “It is also a vital and growing source of direct communication between ABC7 and our viewers.”

With more than 145,000 followers, KABC also says they are the leader of local stations on Twitter.  General manager Arnold J. Kleiner said social media “is a priority for us as we look to the future of local television.”

“We are all connected in social media more than ever and as the most watched television station in Southern California we want to serve our viewers just as well in the social space as we do on television,” he said.

New Study Shows Commercial Breaks Aren’t for Tweeting

Many local TV stations are still trying to figure out how to work the whole social media “thing” into their broadcasts. A new study by SocialGuide addresses the “when” of social media activity and not the “what.”

The study shows only 30% of tweets are sent during commercial breaks, while 70% percent of tweets are sent out during the show itself.

While the study was conducted with a mix of cable and broadcast programs and not local news, the study shows that asking for twitter responses right before a break may not be such a good idea.

You can see the full infographic from the study after the jump. Read more

WATCH: How to Use Social Media and Keep Your Job


If you’re on-air and like to use social media to keep up with your viewers, you’ve no doubt heard about anchors or reporters who have lost their jobs after tweeting too much or saying the wrong thing on facebook.

Well, have no fear! Stephanie Tsoflias, Mediabistro instructor and working TV reporter, is here to share her top three tips for using social media and keeping your job.

If you like what you hear, click on this link to sign up for Tsoflias’ “TV News reporting” class or go to mediabistro.com to search for something else you may want to learn.

Gannett Sets New Social Media Policy

Starting today, employees at Gannett stations have a new social media policy to adhere to.

In the lengthy memo from Gannett CEO Gracia Martore, which you can read in full on Jim Romenesko’s site, the company notes that social media “is core to our strategic goal of reinventing local journalism in the digital age,” but warns employees to conduct themselves with care. Among the guidelines: “assume that all of your activities on a social media site are public, regardless of the privacy tools you may use” and “never post anything you would not be willing [to] publish or broadcast.”

The memo clearly states that violating the social media policy “may result in disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.”

KPRC Tweets Rival Station’s Photos of Truck Accident

After a tanker truck overturned on a Houston highway Tuesday, NBC affiliate KPRC tweeted photos showing a rival station’s coverage of the accident. Houston media blogger Mike McGuff spotted the social media slip-up.

KPRC tweeted the screengrabs, which clearly show ABC O&O KTRK‘s graphics and a chyron displaying the name of KTRK’s morning chopper reporter, on Tuesday. The tweets have since been deleted.

In response, KTRK produced a promo video (watch it here).

“When you really need video of breaking news, who are you going to watch? Well, Channel 2 knows who to turn to,” the promo says. “They used SkyEye13 shots of a flipped tanker on on 610, tweeting it to their viewers! You’re welcome, Channel 2.”

WKYC’s Lynna Lai Discovers She’s Facebook Friends With Cleveland Kidnapping Suspect

There are a lot of unanswered questions in the case of three missing women who were rescued Monday in Cleveland, but we know at least one thing about the alleged kidnapper: he is a fan of WKYC weekend anchor Lynna Lai.

Lai, who joined WKYC from rival WOIO last year, discovered yesterday that she is one of just 55 friends the suspect, Ariel Castro, has on Facebook.

“Crazy — I’m FB friends with suspect Ariel Castro. Who knew???” Lai wrote on her personal Facebook page. “Just so you know – I accept friend requests from all viewers, so I don’t actually know him. What a surreal day!”

KXAS Apologizes for Facebook Joke About Soldier’s Death

KXAS, the NBC O&O in Dallas, is facing criticism after a Facebook post about a Fort Hood solider’s death.

The soldier was shot accidentally by a fellow soldier, who held a gun to his face in an attempt to scare away his hiccups. The post (right) reads “BOOops” and features an image of a gun, along with encouraging viewers to share their cure for hiccups.

The post generated many comments on the station’s Facebook page.

“It’s not funny to make a joke about someone’s death. Especially a young soldier who died because of a stupid, stupid prank,” one person wrote.

“It is good to know that a MAJOR TV outlet can admit its errors. Thank You, do not change,” another commented.

A tipster tells us the post was up for 40 minutes before KXAS removed it and posted an apology.

“We have removed the previous post to our Facebook page that many of you felt was insensitive,” the station wrote. “We apologize for the error in judgement.”

R.L. Stine: ERMAHGERD! My First Big Break

He makes his living scaring children and has been called the Stephen King of children’s books.

“Goosebumps” author, R.L. Stine sat down with mediabistroTV to talk about how finding a typewriter at the age of nine started him on his journey to becoming one of the most successful children’s book authors in history.

For more videos, check out our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV

Study: Sometimes a TV is Just a TV

Despite a growing trend of connecting TV sets to the internet so viewers can watch TV and surf the web, a recent study shows consumers are using their new connected TVs to do one thing, watch TV.

The study, conducted by consumer research company NPD, shows that six out of ten consumers who own a connected HDTV are watching what they call “Over the Top” video services through the TV instead of using the device to tweet, post on facebook or read books or magazines. The culprit?  Too much choice.

There are six or more types of devices bringing the Internet to HDTVs: the TV itself, video game consoles, Blu-ray Disc players, streaming media set top boxes, TiVo, and a few audio/video receivers. While 15 percent of HDTV displays are connected directly to the Internet, that number increases to 29 percent of HDTVs screens due to these other devices. This is driving the availability of around two connected eco-systems on the same TV screen, leading to a confused user-experience as consumers have more than one way of accessing their favorite TV apps. Read more

Local Stations Put the Brakes on Drunk Driving

With the holiday season comes concern about an increase in drinking and driving.  In response, the Ad Council, TVB and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are educating the public about the dangers and cost of drunk driving with “Project Roadblock: Local TV Puts the Brakes on Drunk Driving.”

“Local television broadcasters have donated countless hours of media to our Buzzed Driving Prevention campaign,” said Peggy Conlon, Ad Council president and CEO. “Their generosity for Project Roadblock 2012 will further extend our critical ‘buzzed driving is drunk driving’ message into homes nationwide during this holiday season.”

Stations participating in Project Roadblock air multimedia PSAs between December 26 and New Year’s Eve designed to let viewers know about the dangers of getting behind the wheel after drinking. Read more

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