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Posts Tagged ‘Jim Spencer’

KXAN Ups Shannon Wolfson to Evening Anchor

wolfson_croppedKXAN has promoted investigative reporter Shannon Wolfson to evening anchor for the Austin NBC affiliate.

Beginning December 2, Wolfson will join Robert Hadlock, chief weathercaster Jim Spencer and sports director Roger Wallace for the KXAN 5, 6 and 10:00 p.m. newscasts and the 9:00 pm. news on CW affiliate KNVA.

“I’ve been so honored and humbled to be part of this team of incredible journalists at KXAN for the last seven years,” Wolfson said in a statement. “I’m beyond excited about this new opportunity and look forward to continuing my investigative reporting, as well.”

Wolfson takes over for Leslie Rhode who announced she was leaving last month. She started at KXAN in 2006 as a reporter and was named named main anchor of the CW news at 9:00 p.m. in 2009. She came back to the station as an investigative reporter in June after a three month hiatus.

[Austin American-Statesman]

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In Austin, Meteorologists Feel the Summer Heat

To many local news viewers, nothing is more important than the weather — and in Texas, where a statewide drought has been plaguing the residents, viewers are watching closely for any sign of relief.

The Austin American-Statesmen profiles four meteorologists in the Austin market  — Scott Fisher (pictured) of KTBC, Mark Murray of KVUE, Troy Kimmel of KEYE and Jim Spencer of KXAN. The four of them agree: there’s no end in sight, and that fact alone makes forecasting close to impossible.

“I agonize over two or three degrees, because I want to be right 100 percent of the time,” Fisher said. All the meteorologists say they begin to prepare their forecasts hours before they go on the air — looking at maps, analyzing data and thinking of new ways to tell viewers that the weather will likely be hot and dry, again. (“Someone brought in a thesaurus the other day, and I said, ‘Hey, can I borrow that?’” Murray recalled.) Read more