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quote of note

Quote of Note | Jonathan Ive

jonathan_ive sm“We’re surrounded by anonymous, poorly made objects. It’s tempting to think it’s because the people who use them don’t care—just like the people who make them. But what we’ve shown is that people do care. It’s not just about aesthetics. They care about things that are thoughtfully conceived and well made. We make and sell a very, very large number of (hopefully) beautiful, well-made things. our success is a victory for purity, integrity—for giving a damn.”

-Jonathan Ive, Apple’s senior vice president of design, in an interview with John Arlidge for Time
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Quote of Note | George Lois

george_lois“I know everybody means well, but I resent being called the ‘Original Mad Man.’ The 1960s was a heroic age in the history of art and communication—the audacious movers and shakers of those times bear no resemblance to the cast of characters in Mad Men. This maddening show is nothing more than a soap opera, set in a glamorous office where stylish fools hump their appreciative, coiffed secretaries, suck up martinis, and smoke themselves to death as they produce dumb, lifeless advertising—oblivious to the inspiring Civil Rights movement, the burgeoning Women’s Lib movement, the evil Vietnam War, and other seismic changes during the turbulent, roller-coaster 1960s that altered America forever. So, fuck you Mad Men—you phony, ‘Grey Flannel Suit,’ male-chauvinist, no talent, wasp, white-shirted, racist, anti-semitic, Republican SOBs! Besides, when I was in my 30s I was better looking than Don Draper.”

-George Lois (pictured above in 1964) in an interview with Muse magazine

Quote of Note | Wes Anderson

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“At one point my older brother and I decided we wanted to make an entrance to our house through the roof. So we cut a hole in the roof and went into the attic. We had a plan for the whole thing, and it took days. Then my father saw it, and I don’t ever remember seeing him like this. He couldn’t believe it. It was unthinkable. We’d cut a hole in the roof of our house! Now that I think of it, I realize how horrifying it would be.”

-Wes Anderson, in an interview that appears in the March 6 issue of Time Out New York

Quote of Note | Oliviero Toscani

ot“Art is the highest expression of human communication. And by Art I don’t mean only painting or sculpture or the ancient and traditional arts, but above all the modern, mass arts, like: photography, design, fashion, architecture, cinematography and so on.

Creativity is communication. Today the creativity of communication is conditioned by an obsessive search for consensus, in the false belief that consensus is success. Fear of failure always produces mediocrity, because the chosen solution will always be the least risky and the most banal. In most cases, doesn’t even attempt to be original, but wants, rather, to be a mediocre and repetitious replica of it.”

-Photographer Oliviero Toscani in a speech presented last year at the Art Directors Club’s Annual Awards and Festival of Art & Craft in Advertising and Design. His address has recently been made into a newspaper and a series of typographic posters by illustrator Ben Weeks and Underline Studio

Quote of Note | John Richardson

1919“It helps to know that the pitchers in his still lifes are almost always the ones with the spout sticking up like a phallus. And the fruit dish: a few soft peaches are the breasts. When you crack the codes, you understand that they are pictures about his love of a woman, his desire, his anger, his disdain. And you understand why his pictures that only show a pitcher and fruit dish can be so sexy and also so unbelievably sad. And then he turned everything over again and suddenly he was the very fruit dish himself. This is one of the greatest challenges when writing about Picasso, because for much of what one writes about him, the exact opposite is also true. A person with such an extreme personality, with such extraordinary hypersensitivity, with so many contradictions—that kind of person usually ends up in the nuthouse.”

-Picasso biographer John Richardson, interviewed by Cornelius Tittel in 032c

Quote of Note | Marc Jacobs

mj-ss-2014

“…Jamie [Bochert, fit model and muse] comes in with jet black hair and traipses in some old Victorian dress in the middle of summer. And you know what? She looks cool. So you sort of say, ‘Why not?’ We started looking at things that are Victorian. It really started with a pair of surf shorts and a Victorian blouse….There were a list of reasons: the final scene of Pippin. This book of women in Tahiti wearing Victorian blouses and making these tropical print quilts. Maybe a bit of what Prada’s men’s show was. Maybe a lot of things I’ve taken in. Then Jamie walks in with this dress and all of a sudden you’re adding things up, and somehow I make a logical connection between those things. There is no right or wrong.”

-Marc Jacobs discussing the origins of his spring 2014 Marc Jacobs collection (pictured) in an interview with Bridget Foley in WWD Collections

Quote of Note | Naresh Ramchandani on the Name Game

nametag

“A name cannot only be spoken, it needs to be visually expressed, and it’s useful if it can look good when it is. Flower names, beast names, object names, time length names and space and size names all have good visual potential. I’m thinking Pointerdog for a search engine, Five Mile for a minicab firm, Ringlets for a children’s jewellery range. Names that have something interesting or attractive about their letterform also have good visual potential. I’m thinking MOOD with its circles and curves for a perfume, or Dignify with its two nice dots for an over-60s face cream. Don’t give a graphic designer an abstract name with awful letter forms and expect them to do a good wordmark or logo, or to be happy.”

-Pentagram’s Naresh Ramchandani in “How To Get a Name Right,” an essay published in the winter issue of YCN Magazine

Quote of Note | Marcel Dzama

“I’ve always remembered Where the Wild Things Are so clearly, which isn’t the case with most other children’s books. Wild Things was a favorite from the start. I remember looking at the images a lot and really studying [Maurice Sendak's] crosshatching at a young age—and even attempting to draw like him on my own. This was probably kindergarten, and so he was an early influence. All of the fantastic creatures—and especially the monsters…have such character and personality, and it’s so great that they’re not evil monsters but more co-conspirators. Maybe Maurice got me started on monsters and beasts, which pop in my work a lot, too.”

-Artist Marcel Dzama, in an interview with Spike Jonze that appears in Marcel Dzama: Sower of Discord, the sublime new monograph from Abrams

Quote of Note | Dan Neil

ford f-150

“Ford changed the game this week when it unveiled its aluminum-intensive pickup truck, the 2015 F-150, that is as much as 700 pounds lighter than a comparable steel-bodied vehicle. To the casual observer, the anticipated 3 mpg (20%) increase gained by Ford’s high-tech ‘light-weighting’ (a term of art) may seem marginal, but I assure you it is a figure of immediate and national consequence.

[Gives example of fuel economy gain and resulting net efficiency of Toyota Prius, which averages 50 mpg, with that of low-mpg vehicles like pickups, in which the fuel-saving effect is multiplied: to nearly four times that of the Prius, in his example.] Now reckon with the Big Multiplier: 763,000. That is the number of F-series trucks Ford sold last year, a figure that on its own would make the F-series the seventh largest vehicle company in the U.S. market. By virtue of the hundreds of millions of miles rolled up by the F-series annually, you are looking at the single biggest real-world advance in fuel economy in any vehicle since the Arab oil embargo.”

-Dan Neil, in his “Rumble Seat” column in this weekend’s Wall Street Journal

Quote of Note | Jerry Saltz on Kanye West

bound 2 kw

“’Bound 2′ is certainly a piece of work—as bizarrely gonzo and creepily asexual as Jeff Koons‘s hyperrealistic 1991 paintings of himself having sex with his then-wife Cicciolina, John Currin‘s 1989 paintings of Breck girls, and Marina Abramovic’s staring at spectators at MoMA in 2010. “Bound 2” is different: a freakish act of creation and destruction by appropriation. It stars Kanye and his fiancée, Kim Kardashian, and we see (along with the two of them) wild horses running in rivers, eagles flying to the sky, sunsets, purple mountain majesties, redwood forests, and gulfstream waters. It’s a teenage girl’s bedroom’s idea of romance crossed with Richard Prince‘s Cowboy photographs, American Romanticism, Celestial Seasonings packages, shampoo commercials, Iranian music videos, Thomas Kinkaid, beer ads, Jeff Koons, The Onion, Lars von Trier, the House of Fendi, and Jeffrey Deitch and his own uncanny 1992 prophecy ‘The Freudian model of the psychological person is dissolving…freed of the constraints of one’s past.” The New Uncanny is un-self-consciousness filtered through hyper-self-consciousness, unprocessed absurdity, grandiosity of desire, and fantastic self-regard.”

-New York art critic Jerry Saltz on Kanye West‘s “Bound 2” video, directed by Nick Knight

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