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quote of note

Quote of Note | Robin Derrick

porter logo

“The branding for the logo was designed to make the magazine look like it had been on the shelf for 50 years, and the challenge was to make it look both classical and also capture the digital newsness of the brand all at the same time. The capital-height lower case ‘e’ is given an italic emphasis to feminize the design, and is a subliminal wink towards the online functionality.”

-Robin Derrick, creative director of Porter, the print magazine from Net-a-porter that debuts next month on newsstands worldwide and via subscription.

Quote of Note | Jon Rafman

Jon Rafman
El Lissitzky Video Editing Suite (2011), part of Jon Rafman’s Brand New Paint Job series

“Digitally skinning an object in a 3D program is a simple process of changing the surface of an object or environment. That’s what I like about Brand New Paint Job—it walks the line between art and design by forcing High Modernist painting into becoming wallpaper, and in the process realizing one of painting’s greatest fears, which is becoming decorative. In the same way the functional room or object becomes somewhat useless in having itself covered and being turned into an art object. It’s also a comment on the nature of the relationship between art and design, and how important design is to art. Design is a huge part of the art vernacular—even though it’s deconstructed and used in anti-design ways—especially for my generation, where people are using and appropriating branding techniques and corporate aesthetics. It’s almost troll-like: on one level I’m trolling the paintings and on another level I’m trolling interior-design chic as a concept.”

-Jon Rafman in an interview with Stephen Froese that appears in the new issue of PIN-UP

Quote of Note | James Dyson

“You learn from [negative feedback]. Often it starts a line of development: Well, yes, that person said they want a light vacuum, which is impossible, because motors are very heavy. So you say, ‘We might develop light electric motors—no one’s ever done it before; we must do it.’ About eighteen years ago, we set off on that journey. It took us fifteen years before we launched a revolutionary small, light motor. Negative feedback is really interesting. I enjoy it in a masochistic way.”

-James Dyson, in Bloomberg Businessweek

Illustration of James Dyson and his trusty Air Multiplier by Adrian Tomine for The New Yorker.

Quote of Note | Ralph McGinnis

paeoi“I’ve been blogging since 1999 so I’m neither [a print publication nor a website]. But there is a difference. Magazines are about editing and choice, while the Internet is about immediacy. The art of making a magazine is editing. You have to make a choice, stick with it, then it’s out in the world and it’s done. That’s why I don’t believe print is dead. It’s not just old people, it’s young people too. A 20-year-old photographer doesn’t care if their photograph is posted online. But if that photo gets in a magazine, they love it. They understand it’s a big deal.”

-Ralph McGinnis, co-founder of tasty zine Put A Egg On It, in an interview with author Jeremy Leslie in The Modern Magazine: Visual Journalism in the Digital Era (Laurence King)

Quote of Note | Miuccia Prada

look36“Ugly is attractive, ugly is exciting. Maybe because it is newer. The investigation of ugliness is, to me, more interesting than the bourgeois idea of beauty. And why? Because ugly is human. It touches the bad and the dirty side of people. You know, this might have been a scandal in fashion but in other fields of art it is common: in painting and in movies, it was so common to see ugliness. But, yet, it was not used in fashion and I was very much criticized for inventing the trashy and the ugly.”

-Designer Miuccia Prada, in an interview with Andrew O’Hagan for T: The New York Times Style Magazine

Pictured: A look from the spring 2014 Prada collection

Quote of Note | Rick Owens

email

“I prefer e-mailing to phone calls—I like how thoughts can be reconsidered, corrected, and improved in an e-mail. Like an old-fashioned love letter. And instructions can be carefully specified and referred to later. Am I robotic? Maybe. I think spontaneity may be overrated.”
-Designer Rick Owens

Quote of Note | Will Cotton

cotton laduree“Macarons are the quintessential confectionery delight. In the macaron, the color, texture, and flavor become so much more than the sum of their parts. And since the flavors aren’t dictated by the cookies’ form, each one becomes a vessel of endless possibility for the most fantastic flavor imaginable.”

-Will Cotton, discussing his collaboration with Ladurée. The artist’s macaron flavor (think ginger-infused whipped cream) and box debuts this week in Miami at Art Basel Miami Beach.

Quote of Note | Sarah Lucas

(Sarah Lucas)“What are my thoughts about Christmas cards? Maybe it’s nice to receive a few from certain ­people, and send a few so they know you haven’t forgotten them. That’s about it. I don’t send many. I ­usually make my own. William Blake said that Christ is the Imagination. Not that He exists only in the ­imagination, but that He literally is the Imagination. So that’s a good argument for making your own. At least it’s outside of the racket. As for this one? Well, it’s for the turkeys, really!”

-Artist Sarah Lucas in The Guardian, for which she created this fowl-themed holiday greeting

Quote of Note | Ellen von Unwerth

(Ellen von Unwerth)
Ellen von Unwerth’s “Kissing Booth” (2002)

“Shooting film is a little bit more exciting. It’s more precious, and it’s more technical. You take it out and even the assistant is proud. Everything seems to be more electric. With digital you shoot and shoot, and it doesn’t cost anything. The moment is not as precious.”

-Ellen von Unwerth in an interview with the Los Angeles Times. An exhibition of her photographs, “Made in America,” is on view through January 4 at L.A.’s Fahey/Klein Gallery.

Quote of Note | Neal Adams

(DC Comics)

“That’s the difference between DC and Marvel comics: all the characters at DC, because of their history, were all all sparkly-tooth Americans; they smiled, they had good jobs, they had secret identities. At Marvel, Jack [Kirby] convinced Stan [Lee] that the four characters who would go off into specae, be bombarded by cosmic rays, and come back as monsters. All [the Marvel stars] were essentially monsters turned into superheroes. Over at DC we had golden-toothed heroes. Even the new guys: test pilot, lab scientist. It’s still the difference between the two companies. When people talk about Spider-Man and his personality problems, it’s all part of the monster side of the superhero genre as opposed to DC. Batman is the closest to the Marvel characters that DC has.”

-Green Lantern and Batman artist Neal Adams, interviewed by Paul Levitz in The Silver Age of DC Comics (Taschen)

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