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Archives: March 2013

Quote of Note | Glenn O’Brien

“Advanced fashion usually makes me feel like turning around. I see a neon jumpsuit or a button-down shirt with sentences written on it, and I start thinking about fracking, Fukushima, voting machines, the Bilbao Guggenheim. But, reassuringly, a lot of people seem to agree with me. The future is iffy. I guess that explains the boom is what is referred to as ‘retro,’ which is manifest lately in a return to tailored clothing, beards, gray flannel, tweeds, and waxed-cotton outerwear.

Years ago, I couldn’t find a three-piece suit, so I had one made. I couldn’t find a three-button seersucker suit, so I had one made. I guess I am a fashion leader, but in reverse. Sorry, but I just like reading silver fork novels by candlelight in my smoking jacket.”

-Renegade traditionalist Glenn O’Brien, in an essay that appears in the spring 2013 issue of Bergdorf Goodman Magazine

Metropolitan Museum of Art to Open Eight Days a Week (OK, Seven)

Since 1971, Mondays at the Metropolitan Museum of Art have been reserved for journalists (attending life-enhancing press previews) and crestfallen tourists. The latter bunch, recognizable by their non-black garments, lack of writing utensils, and general giddiness, mounts the famed staircase in twos and threes only to discover that the museum is…CLOSED. A rapid progression through the five stages of grief follows, and by the time anger (“I told you we should have checked the website!”) turns to acceptance, the out-of-towners are proceeding north to the Guggenheim. That scenario will come to an end on July 1, when the Met’s new schedule takes effect: the museum, both the main building and the Cloisters, will open to the public seven days a week. “Art is a seven-day-a-week passion, and we want the Met to be accessible whenever visitors have the urge to experience this great museum,” said director Thomas Campbell in a statement issued this week.
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Guard on Duty During Gardner Museum Heist Talks to CNN

The FBI announced earlier this week that it has identified who was behind the 1990 art heist at Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, but–spoiler alert–the Feds aren’t naming names, and the statute of limitations has run out on the crime, so the creeps that swiped masterpieces by the likes of Rembrandt, Vermeer, Degas can’t be prosecuted. This may or not explain why Rick Abbath, one of the night watchmen on duty the evening of the crime 23 years ago, has decided to get chatty. In a segment (below) that aired this week on Anderson Cooper 360°, CNN’s Randi Kaye spoke with Abbath about what happened inside the museum that fateful night. Kaye takes a closer look at the famous caper in 81 Minutes: Inside the Greatest Art Heist in History, a documentary that airs on CNN tonight at 10 p.m. Eastern.

TEFAF, Take Two: Skulls, Artists’ Jewelry, and Great Design


Hurry up, please, it’s time. TEFAF favorite Kunstkammer Georg Laue’s offerings included, at right, a Renaissance vanitas cabinet. Lest would-be buyers tarry, the front door of the cabinet opens to reveal a scene with a naked child leaning on a skull with an hourglass at his feet.

Shoppers ranging from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to Kanye West have popped into the European Fine Art Fair (TEFAF), which runs through Sunday in the Dutch town of Maastricht. No word on Kanye’s haul, but the Met scored “Virgil’s Tomb in Moonlight” (1779) by Joseph Wright of Derby (a poster version is yours for $19.99), Ronald Lauder picked up Picasso‘s “Homme au Chapeau” (1964) for $8 million, and the soon-to-reopen Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has enriched its collection with works including an 1809 Nicolaas Bauer canvas and Antoine Vechte‘s silver “Galathea” vase, created in 1843 for a French nobleman. Meanwhile, 26-year-old TEFAF is looking eastward: the fair’s organizers announced this week that they’re in talks with Sotheby’s to develop an art fair in China, so stay tuned for updates on “TEFAF Beijing 2014.” We’ve still got plenty to show from you from this year’s artstravaganza in Maastricht–check out 25 more must-sees:


Gagosian gallery positioned this 1946 Picasso nearby Rudolf Stingel‘s 2012 photo-realist painting of the artist as young man. At right, L’Arc de Seine’s jaw-dropping stand featured a circa 1930 shagreen-covered desk and chair by Jean-Michel Frank.


The secret to eternal youth? Multiple suitors and frequent ski trips, suggests this first edition from Shapero Rare Books.


Didier Ltd’s assortment of jewelry by artists included this one-of-a-kind silver brooch made by Harry Bertoia during his time at Cranbrook in the ’40s. And what do you get when you combine a fishing float painted black and a gilded beer can? Louise Nevelson‘s 1984 pendant necklace.
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Quote of Note | Jeanne Gang

“Tall buildings are all about statistics. There are entire websites devoted to how to measure the height, which building has the highest square-footage of hospitality space versus residential space; there are many, many categories and there are lots of high-rise aficionados that keep track of those things. There’s a guy in my gym that knows more about the stats of tall buildings than I do. He’ll ask me questions when I’m on the treadmill like, ‘Is the Sears Tower 1,700 feet, or do they count the…?’ and then he’ll rattle back.”

-Architect Jeanne Gang, interviewed by Michael Bullock in the latest issue of PIN–UP

Design Jobs: Gannett, Washingtonian Magazine, Spa Week Media Group

This week, Gannett is hiring a senior graphic designer, while Washingtonian Magazine needs a photo director. Spa Week Media Group is seeking a graphic designer, and the American Marketing Association is on the hunt for a graphic designer, too. Get the scoop on these openings and more below, and find additional just-posted gigs on Mediabistro.

Find more great design jobs on the UnBeige job board. Looking to hire? Tap into our network of talented UnBeige pros and post a risk-free job listing. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

Watch This: Jolan van der Wiel’s ‘Gravity Stool’

Jólan van der Wiel‘s “Gravity” stools, tables, candleholders, and bowls appear ripped from an enchanted sea floor–or are they Magic Rocks run amok? At once otherworldly and organic, these moody forms are in fact the products of the Amsterdam-based designer’s “Gravity Tool,” an innovation that earned him top honors at last year’s DMY International Design Festival Berlin. “I admire objects that show an experimental discovery, translated to a functional design,” explains van der Wiel. “It is my belief that developing new ‘tools’ is an important means of inspiration and allows new forms to take shape.” Now, just two years out of the Gerrit Rietveld Academy designLAB, he has a “Gravity stool” at London’s Design Museum, as part of the “Designs of the Year 2013” show that opens today. This short film by Miranda Stet provides a luscious look at van der Wiel’s unique process, which is something of a team effort among opposing magnetic fields, the forces of gravity, two-component plastics, and good old-fashioned elbow grease.

Are You Earning What You Should? Consult Coroflot’s Creative Employment Snapshot

The design-minded datacrunchers over at Coroflot recently released their redesigned and better-than-ever Design Salary Guide, now a rolling (and free!) tool that reports results in real-time. They’ve followed it up with an executive summary of sorts that is tailor-made for designers–in a word, infographics. Check out the just-published “Creative Employment Snapshot” for a visual presentation of the current state of employment in design, creative, and interaction fields–including current and potential earnings. There’s even a PDF version to print out and slip onto your boss’s desk.

Walker Art Center Welcomes Letman: Watch Tonight’s Live Webcast and Lettering Demo

The amazing Letman (a.k.a. Job Wouters) will be on hand tonight at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis to discuss and demonstrate his eye-popping approach to the alphabet–think illustration meets grafitti meets graphic design. The Amsterdam-based designer’s talk and hand-lettering demo, which will be webcast live at 7 p.m. EST, is part of the Walker’s “Insights” series of design lectures that earlier this month welcomed Geoff McFetridge and Eike König, and next week features Wouters’ fellow Mokummer, Luna Maurer. Each of the designers has been commissioned to create a project for the Walker, and Wouters is at work on mural. While you await tonight’s webcast, enjoy his 2003 video, “”abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz” (below), in which Wouters and his then four-year-old nephew, Gradus, practice their penmanship.

Lori Greiner Discusses ‘Oprah Effect,’ What Inventors Need to Succeed

Lori Greiner knows firsthand the power of Oprah Winfrey to sell product.

In part two of our conversation with Greiner, the “Queen of QVC” and regular on ABC’s Shark Tank tells SocialTimes editor Devon Glenn what happens when one of your products makes the list of Oprah’s favorite things, how every inventor thinks they have the greatest thing in the world, and what they need to do to make sure they’re right.

For more videos, check out our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV

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