Liquid Treat AgencySpy AdsoftheWorld BrandsoftheWorld LostRemote TVSpy TVNewser PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC 10,000 Words GalleyCat MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Lorcan O’Herlihy’

Christopher Hawthorne Hates the Building, Loves April Greiman’s Rice

latimes_rice.jpg

Perpetually picky Christopher Hawthorne has hated on Lorcan O’Herlihy, gone out of his way to define ugly, compared Rem to Rove, and this week, trashes Arquitectonica‘s new project in LA. But maybe if he focused on reviewing gigantic public art installations, he would be a lot happier. Because this week, even though he despised the building it straddles, he sure loved April Greiman‘s rice bowl:

What caught my attention first was a huge, brightly colored mural by April Greiman, which covers two ends of the building as they converge at the corner and shows an abstracted rice bowl. The whole ensemble — broad-shouldered, street-hugging architecture meets gigantic work of art — struck me as both full of and larger than life.

We dunno, we say he’s got a second career as a graphic design critic. We wish we could say the same about a few commenters who give their two cents about the mural in the feedback section. Like this one: “Long-time residents are being shoved out of their homes and on to the sidewalks, begging for fair and affordable housing. Is that what the ‘abstracted rice bowl’ is supposed to symbolize?”

Mediabistro Course

Get $25 OFF Freelancing 101 Online 

Freelancing 101Freelancing 101 starts in less than a week! Don’t miss your last chance to save $25 on full registration for this online boot camp with code FLANCE25! Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. Register now! 

Final Hockenberry Question in the Sustainability Lightning Round

hockenberry21.jpg

Hockenberry at Dwell on Design: What percent of this conversation about sustainability will be permanent vs. fad in 10 years?

Geoff Manaugh: We won’t need to talk about sustainability issues because they’ll be the norm. 89%.
Frank Harmon: We’re losing the battle, houses are treated like a box of cereal. 5%
Lorcan O’Herlihy: There’s a way to go. 50%.
Gwynne Pugh: There’s been a fundamental paradigm shift. 30-40%
Reed Kroloff: It depends on the people in the press, to change public opinion. 30%. It also depends on the government to create a tax incentive and energy costs have to keep rising so Americans keep paying attention. And, it depends on you.

That’s a good way to end this episode of Dwell on Design, and also, by starting to think about the next one: June 6,7 & 8, 2008 in…Los Angeles (woohoo!).

All our Dwell on Design coverage.

Coverage from Life Without Buildings, PrairieMod [Day 1] [Day 2], BLDG BLOG, Inhabitat [Day 1] [Day 2]

Wrapping Up With Regionalism

finalpaneldwell.jpg

So they’ve mushed together the final speakers at Dwell on Design, making for a kind of “greatest hits” panel on regionalism. Michelle Kauffman is not here, but we do have Reed Kroloff, Gwynne Pugh, Lorcan O’Herlihy, Frank Harmon and Geoff Manaugh, whose BLDG BLOG gets major Hockenberry praise. (PS: The noise from the exhibition space surrounding the conference area just got deafening as we’re over time and it opened to the public at noon.)

After Frank Harmon’s fascinating slide show of his North Carolina projects, Reed Kroloff (former dean at Tulane) gives a report from New Orleans on the challenges of defining a new and appropriate regional architecture for the city. Look for the Sundance Channel show Architecture School that chronicles the school’s projects. Now for the Q&A.

Hockenberry plugs BLDG BLOG again with a question tacked on the end but Manaugh kind of skirts it, saying he’s most interested in regionalism due to the fact that the weather’s changing–regionalism is essentially climate-appropriate architecture and it will need to adjust. He talks about a map of Europe published in the Guardian based on potential climate zones in 2071: London will have the weather of Lisbon. Now to LOH, who sees regionalism as connectivity to the area–and responsibility to take private outdoor spaces and make them public in the right way.

Then Hockenberry asks Pugh to guess which city has the highest foreclosure rate and he guesses Irvine (dude, Pugh, what do you have against Irvine?), but the answer is Las Vegas, making it the multi-faceted epitome of a non-sustainable community. LA planning director Gail Goldberg gets namechecked for her “city of villages” concepts for San Diego as a good example of a sustainable community.

There’s major blog love for BLDG BLOG again from Hockenberry but by now we think it’s pretty obvious he doesn’t read it. He asks Manaugh if he writes the blog to help people get information about how to transform their communities but Manaugh says that’s not really the intention, it’s more conceptual. Like, hello? BLDG BLOG? That’s one of them smart blogs.

More Dwell on Design coverage
.

A-LOHA, Lorcan!

LOHA_WILLOUGHBY_01B.jpg

Yay, someone’s finally going to talk about LA at Dwell on Design! And he’s certainly the man for the job; Lorcan O’Herlihy has come armed with “Double Edged Density.” Of course the man is talking about the nascent urbanization of our fair city. Cry as much as you want about it but the LA single family house is no longer affordable. The LOH is gonna lay down some density solutions.

LOHA creates their residential projects strategy they call contingent planning, that physically engages the city using nine different principles. Working closely with John Chase, urban designer for the city of West Hollywood, LOHA is working on or has completed four great projects in WeHo–The Willoughby, The Formosa, The Gardner and Habitat 825, the sometime-controversial residential project next door to to R.M. Schindler‘s Kings Road House. Progress on each could be seen during a quick spin on your bike or at the LOHA website.

More Dwell on Design coverage.

Dwell’s Serving Up Hot Architects, Home Tours, and a Big Helping of Hockenberry

DOD_FPO.jpg

After lugging the latest, most unbelievably thickest issue ever all the way from our mailbox, we were excited to spot a few details in a summery-covered Dwell about this year’s “Dwell on Design” conference. Held in San Francisco September 14-16, Dwell’s bringing together great minds for conversations on sustainable living, modern architecture and smart growth. In addition to the conference, an exhibition is open to the public for a small fee ($20 now, $25 then). House tours by the AIA are also available separately.

Among the talking heads are star moderator and designer spawn John Hockenberry along with folks like Andrea Cochran, Michelle Kaufmann, Lorcan O’Herlihy and even Chez Panisse’s Alice Waters . Register here; prices go up August 21.

Hollywood & Highland Declared the Fugliest of All By Curbed LA

2007-04-hh-ugly2.jpg

Disclaimer: There will be no jokes in this post about how easy it is to hold an Ugliest Building Contest in Los Angeles.

Nevertheless, today Curbed LA declared its winner: Hollywood & Highland, the triumphantly ever-morphing mall for tourists. When asked to judge this contest with such local luminaries as Christopher Hawthorne, Lorcan O’Herlihy and Ryan from LosAnjealous, we fully expected that H&H would be a front runner, but we swore to ourselves that we would not malign the white elephants. Hollywood & Highland is not only the building nearest to our hearts (literally) but it truly is the building dearest to our hearts. And by dearest to our hearts, we mean they have a Beard Papa’s, something we simply cannot write this blog without. Say what you will about Hollywood & Highland, but we say: a strawberry cream puff is not ugly.

Thanks to everyone at Curbed LA for this invaluable experience.

2007-04-hh-ugly4.jpg