AdsoftheWorld BrandsoftheWorld LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser TVNewser TVSpy FishbowlNY FishbowlDC GalleyCat

Stephanie Murg

Paul Chan Wins Hugo Boss Prize

chan
Paul Chan’s Master Argument, a 2013 work made from cords, shoes, and concrete, is currently installed at the Schaulager in Basel. (Photo courtesy Greene Naftali gallery)

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and Hugo Boss announced last night that Paul Chan is the winner of the 2014 Hugo Boss Prize. He will receive $100,000 (plus a a terrific tetrahedral trophy, at right), and an exhibition of his work will be on view at the Guggenheim Museum come sping. Other artists shortlisted for this, the tenth Hugo Boss Prize were Sheela Gowda, Camille Henrot, Hassan Khan, and Charline von Heyl. Established in 1996, the biennial award “is conferred upon artists whose work represents a significant development in contemporary art,” according to Hugo Boss and the Guggenheim. Past winners include Danh Vo, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Emily Jacir, and Matthew Barney.
Read more

Pratt to Honor Kim Hastreiter, Iris Apfel, and David Yurman at Legends Gala

pratt legends

The age-old battle of statement eyeglasses versus statement jewelry will be waged this evening at NYC’s Mandarin Oriental as Pratt Institute entices art and design-loving donors to open their checkbooks and their autograph books for the school’s annual Legends scholarship benefit. The 2014 honorees, “distinguished individuals whose accomplishments and values resonate with those of Pratt,” are PAPER magazine co-founder and editor-in-chief Kim Hastreiter (fresh from breaking the Internet avec longtime PAPER collaborator Jean-Paul Goude), style icon and designer Iris Apfel, and designer and jewelry honcho David Yurman. Doling out the honors will be presenters Padma Lakshmi, fashion designer Duro Olowu, and Paul Greenhalgh, director of the Sainsbury Center for Visual Arts, respectively. Among guests expected to party the night away against a sweeping backdrop of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline are Pratt alums such as photographer Sylvia Plachy and Publicolor Ruth Lande Shuman, designer and Tolix chair skeptic Karim Rashid, artist Kehinde Wiley (a 2012 Pratt Legends honoree), and writer/host Kurt Andersen, a Pratt trustee.

Quote of Note | Jonathan Ive

jony_ive_1“What drove the design of the wrist watch wasn’t fashion, but utilitarianism and pragmatism. An aviator commissioned Cartier to design it because he didn’t want to take his hand off the joystick when flying. But when something is worn, issues of fashion, style and personal preference come into it. I think one of the biggest challenges we found with the Apple Watch was that we wouldn’t want to all be sitting here wearing the same thing, which is why we designed a flexible system rather than a singular product.”

-Jonathan Ive, senior vice president of Design at Apple, in a recent talk at London’s Design Museum as part of DM25—a year-long series of events staged in celebration of the museum’s 25th anniversary

Simplify, Soften, Enrich: Hella Jongerius on Redesigning KLM’s Business Class Cabins

As if you needed another reason to plan a trip to the Netherlands, Utrecht- and Berlin-based Hella Jongerius recently completed an overhaul of KLM’s World Business cabins. Writer Nancy Lazarus recently got the scoop on the project.

Hella Jongerius
(Photo: Oliver Mark Photo)

“Humans dream of flying, of floating, and we have extra time on planes. So I wanted to have a place where passengers can dream, be at home, have a craft feel, and a human touch,” said Hella Jongerius earlier this week at New York’s Museum of Arts and Design (MAD). “For airlines it’s all about efficiency, but you also need tactility.” The Dutch designer, known for playfully integrating industrial design with craftsmanship, was interviewed by MAD drector Glenn Adamson on Monday evening in an on-stage conversation that focused on Jongerius’s redesign of KLM’s World Business Class cabins, a project she worked on for two years starting in 2011.

Working on high-end aviation design can be equally challenging and rewarding, according to Jongerius. “There’s lots of exhausting moments on planes when you can’t move around. But as a designer you can act and contribute to solving that situation,” she explained. “KLM was open to different approaches, and with business class we wanted to do extra things since it’s for luxury.” The interior redesign started with the curtains, carpets, and seat covers and expanded to include the seats. The new cabin rollout includes twenty-two 747s and fifteen 777 KLM planes.
Read more

StoryCorps Founder Dave Isay Wins $1 Million TED Prize

storycorps

The creators of the painstakingly produced narrative form of our time–the TED Talk–are handing over their big prize to another intrepid storyteller: Dave Isay, founder of StoryCorps. The groundbreaking oral history project will receive $1 million from TED to launch Isay’s wish, an audacious ambition-cum-megaproject that he’ll announce on March 17 at the 2015 TED Conference in Vancouver. Isay joins a diverse list of past TED Prize-winning “exceptional individuals” that have ranged from Bill Clinton and E.O. Wilson to culinary crusader Jamie Oliver and street artist JR.

Launched by Isay in 2003, StoryCorps “celebrates the dignity, power, and grace that can be heard in the stories we find all around us,” including the crowd-pleaser “Danny and Annie” (below). “Under Dave Isay’s leadership, StoryCorps has given nearly 100,000 Americans the chance to record interviews about their lives and leave a legacy for the future,” says TED’s Chris Anderson. “I am thrilled about this winner, excited to see how TED and StoryCorps will collaborate, and eager to see how we can pair an incredible idea with a global community.”
Read more

Twitter Along with UnBeige

twitter_sample.jpg

Famed literary critic Lionel Trilling once described Henry James as a “social twitterer.” Sure, he meant it as an insult, but it makes us feel better about having joined the tweeting masses. Look to the UnBeige Twitter feed for up-to-the-minute newsbites, event snippets, links of interest, design trivia, and our exclusive photo of Rem Koolhaas in mid-ponder—it makes for smashing smartphone wallpaper.

Anonymous Tips: Because Sharing Is Caring

who could it be now.jpgIf we’ve heard it once, we’ve heard it a thousand times: “I could tell you this Big Design News, but then I’d have to kill you.” Now you can give us the scoop and skip the messy murder plot, thanks to our “Anonymous Tips” box, which the Mediabistro tech wizards have placed at the top right of this page. Your mission, should you choose to accept it: Type in your news—design happenings, gossip, movements of the Revolving Door, a designer’s hidden talent, or any newsy, design-y morsel—and click “send.” We’ll get the news, you’ll retain your air of mystery.

Ten Things You (Probably) Didn’t Know About Erik Spiekermann

EPSON DSC PictureThe avalanche of fan e-mail, likes, and tweets that greeted our recent dispatch from Erik Spiekermann‘s evening with the Type Directors Club at Parsons The New School for Design has inspired us to glean additional knowledge morsels for your reading pleasure. Enjoy these ten things you (probably) didn’t know about the man, the myth, the Spiekermann:

1. He got his start as a gofer for Wolff Olins.
In the mid-1970s, while working the nightshift at a typesetter’s, Wally Olins hired him to work for Wolff Olins in London. “They had 60 or 70 people at the time and lots of German clients [such as Audi and VW],” said Spiekermann. “Some of them couldn’t communicate with their German clients, because the German clients spoke German and the Brits spoke English—at the time not everybody spoke English, unlike today—so I became the gofer, I guess, between the German clients and Wolff Olins.”

2. He used to blow clients’ minds with color prints.
“[In the mid-70s] you would go into clients with color printouts…11 by 17…and it was like glass beads for Native Americans—they would think you were from Mars. They would pass them around,” he explained. “I had the same effect after German reunification in 1990, when we had a client in East Germany and we went there with color prints. By that time in the West everyone had them, but they thought we were from Mars: ‘Look at these guys from the West. They have color prints! Amazing! They have a machine does them. And it’s on ordinary paper and it only take a minute!’ It was like having gunpowder.”

3. Wolff Olins is also to thank for his first project.
“It was a German bank that was Wolff Olins couldn’t handle, so they said why don’t you take this over—the implementation. Because the Brits were never very good at getting sh*t done.”

4. He is wholly unimpressed by the U.S. Postal Service.
“The American Post Office is one of the crummiest design outfits ever,” said Spiekermann matter-of-factly. “It is embarrassingly bad. It embarrasses me at times. So does their service for that matter. UPS and FedEx—they wouldn’t exist if you had a decent post office.”
Read more

Levitated Mass Documentary Opens in NYC

levitated mass

Now New Yorkers can get the story behind the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s rock star, Levitated Mass (2012), a 456-foot-long slot over which is placed a 340-ton granite megalith. The process of installing the Michael Heizer artwork, which entailed a $10 million, 22-city tour for the boulder and its custom-made trailer, is the subject of a documentary by Doug Pray (Art & Copy, Surfwise) that opens today at the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

“I had always wanted to do a film about L.A., so this seemed about as L.A. as it could get,” Pray told us earlier this year. “The idea that they had to get permits and permissions to allow a giant rock to roll through their town, all in the name of conceptual art, was absurdly entertaining, and often drew shrugs and confused laughter, and controversy.” Levitated Mass weaves together Heizer’s biography, the dreams of a major museum, and the uniting of a city—all while proving that it is possible to make a fascinating film about a massive rock.
Read more

Watch: David Weeks Studio Celebrates a Year in Tribeca

A year has passed since David Weeks branched out from Brooklyn to Manhattan with a standalone atelier in Tribeca that is part design studio, part showspace for one-of-a-kind prototypes, collaborations, and work from other artists. The designer—of stunning lighting, fluidly formed furniture, and craggily adorable wooden creatures—is marking the one-year anniversary with this most delightful visit to the neighborhood, produced by Optic Films.


Read more

NEXT PAGE >>