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art

Gehry-Designed Fondation Louis Vuitton Set for October Opening

1-Fondation Louis Vuitton @ Iwan Baan, 2014
(Photo: Iwan Baan)

Once upon a time, LVMH honcho Bernard Arnault announced his grand plan for a Frank Gehry-designed home for the Fondation Louis Vuitton: it would hover over a 2.5-acre swath of Paris’s Bois de Boulogne like a contemporary art-filled cloud of glass, it would cost around $127 million, it would be open by…2010. No word on the final budget, but opening day is finally in sight: October 27, 2014 will mark the public debut of the 12,600-square-foot building, according to a statement released today by LVMH.

Gehry looked to the lightness of late 19th-century glass and garden architecture in designing the structure, which is perched like an articulated nimbostratus in the leafy Jardin d’Acclimatation. Comprised of a dozen glass “sails,” it is covered in 3,600 panes of glass. The eleven galleries it contains will be dedicated to the permanent collection, temporary exhibitions, and artists’ commissions. Among the opening exhibitions will be one showcasing Gehry’s architectural project for the foundation and timed to coincide with the architect’s first European retrospective, which goes on view in October at the Centre Pompidou.

SEN One Creates Cover for Time Out New York

Time Out New York - Uptown coverYou’ve still got more than two months to catch the Museum of the City of New York’s “City as Canvas” exhibition of graffiti from the Martin Wong collection. For a bite-sized dose, pick up a copy of the latest issue of Time Out New York, on newsstands today, which features an original cover by George “SEN One” Morillo. The graffiti artist, a lifelong Upper West Sider, was an ideal fit for TONY‘s uptown-themed issue. “Being born and raised uptown, and seeing the gentrification process all my life and seeing everybody coming up, it fits who I am,” he tells the magazine. “That story connects to my story.”

As for how that story connects with the street art of today, Morillo points to the humble origins of slick tools with names like Krink and Grog. “We made markers by popping the balls out of roll-on deodorant, putting in the soft stuff from school erasers, and filling the containers with ink. Those techniques, as primitive as they might seem, led to the markers they sell now,” he says. “Vandals created an industry, and it all comes out of the Upper West Side.”

Amar Kanwar to Receive $25K Leonore Annenberg Prize for Art and Social Change

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Indian artist Amar Kanwar is the recipient of the 2014 Leonore Annenberg Prize for Art and Social Change. The $25,000 award is presented annually by New York-based nonprofit arts organization Creative Time to an artist whose work has been devoted to “instigating social awareness and harnessing the communicative power of art to engage communities around important public issues.” New Delhi-based Kanwar plans to use the prize money to advance his ongoing The Sovereign Forest project, which brings together moving and still images, texts, books, music, objects, and seeds, among other things, in an attempt to reopen discussion and initiate a creative response to our understanding of crime, politics, human rights, and ecology. He will receive the prize on November 15 at the Creative Time Summit in Stockholm. He joins past winners including Fernando García-Dory, Jeanne van Heeswijk, and the Yes Men.

Quote of Note | Kara Walker

(Paul Rocheleau)
The Andy Warhol Museum, installation, Skulls. ©AWF (Photo: Paul Rocheleau)

“The Warhol I’ve absorbed, the Warhol who saved me, is the ambivalent cynic. Yes, human beings are worthless and life is slavery, but there is grace to be had in accepting that, loving what makes up our empty capitalist souls, plus a little tiny bit of death.

There are a lot of angles and surfaces, but when it comes to Warhol, depth is a much harder read; it lasts longer.”

-Artist Kara Walker in Thank You Andy Warhol by Catherine Johnson (Glitterati)

Hauser & Wirth Has Big Plans for Los Angeles

hauser wirth schimmelHauser & Wirth is heading West. Nearly a year to the date that the gallery announced the hiring of Paul Schimmel, formerly chief curator of the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, comes word that the planned Left Coast outpost—Hauser Wirth & Schimmel—will occupy a historic 100,000-square-foot flour mill complex in L.A.’s downtown arts district.

The site, located a few blocks from The Broad in progress, is home to seven late 19th and early 20th century buildings and outdoor spaces. The gallery promises “innovative exhibitions, museum-caliber amenities, and a robust schedule of public programs that contextualize the art on view,” beginning with a pop-up exhibition in January of next year. The L.A. venue is slated to have its grand opening in January 2016.
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Quote of Note | Eduardo Basualdo

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Eduardo Basualdo, La Caída, 2013

“Whereas in the beginning I used to stress the viewer’s process of observation by means of miniature drawings and meticulous models, nowadays I work in human scale in order to maintain a direct relationship with the body. At first, the visitors felt the impossibility of inhabiting represented spaces. Now, through my real-scale installations, people experience the violence of architecture.

The body is what I’m most interested in. I try to highlight the limits of our bodies. I think of architecture as a kind of exoskeleton, which holds and controls us and at the same time establishes unique ways of relating to it. Like looking through a piece of glass but being unable to get the other side of it; confronting the possibility of being crushed by a stone; or finding oneself facing a jail whose walls can easily be walked through.”

-Artist Eduardo Basualdo

MFA Boston to Debut Kunstkammer Gallery

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Rare is the human who can resist a cabinet of curiosities—those bewitching, eclectic assortments of man-made and natural wonders that flout traditional taxonomies. The Museum of Fine Arts Boston is inaugurating one of its own in the Kunstkammer Gallery, which opens Wednesday. Among the objects that will be on view in the intimate space are exotic natural materials such as amber, ivory, and coconut shells; paintings on copper and hardstone; and virtuoso metalwork, such as clocks and automata. Follow up a visit to that whimsical space with a trip to the MFA’s newly renovated gallery dedicated to Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings and sculpture, which will also be unveiled on Wednesday.

Quote of Note | Stefan Sagmeister

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“He seemed to put a tremendous amount of energy into those covers; they are very carefully designed and beautifully produced. When he created them, he used his fame and star power. By that I mean it was unlikely that an unknown artist would have been able to persuade record companies to spend the extra money to produce art with those extreme production challenges and difficulties. Think about it. Having a zipper on an album cover? That was not an easy feat. It was expensive and it destroyed the records next to it. And the banana? With the peel, that you could actually peel. That also required extra cost and added necessary attention to production. Both covers are very interactive. The most legendary and memorable designs have always involved the viewer.”

-Stefan Sagmeister on Andy Warhol’s album covers for The Rolling Stones (Sticky Fingers) and the Velvet Underground in Thank You Andy Warhol by Catherine Johnson (Glitterati)

Quote of Note | Fred Tomaselli

FT
Collages from Fred Tomaselli’s ongoing New York Times series are among the new works on view through June 14 in an exhibition at James Cohan Gallery in New York. Pictured, from left: Feb. 11, 2009 (2014) and July 12, 2010 (2013).

“I stopped using pills in 2005. I still use leaves, though not necessarily pot. I use fig, grape, and rose leaves. The fact that you can’t tell the difference means, maybe, that anything I do now has become psychoactive in a way. Like, when I took the pills out, I replaced them with dots, with the idea that they functioned as placebos. Either that, or maybe they’re just dots.”

-Artist Fred Tomaselli interviewed by Paul Laster in Time Out New York

Metropolitan Museum Debuts Roof Garden Commission: Dan Graham with Günther Vogt

Who needs a plain old terrace when you can have a Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout? Nancy Lazarus heads to the roof of the Met to reflect on the matter.

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(Photos: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

As the Metropolitan Museum of Art prepares to roll out the red carpet for its Costume Institute gala, it has rolled out a green carpet of grass turf for its annual roof garden exhibit: Two-Way Hedge Labyrinth Walkabout, a collaboration between American artist Dan Graham and Swiss landscape architect Günther Vogt.

“I designed the changing convex and concave pavilion as a funhouse for kids and a photo op for parents,” said Graham at Monday’s press preview. “The work relates to Central Park and to the earlier works in my collection.” Some of his prior projects are on view in a companion exhibit on the museum’s second floor. That multimedia display encompasses photos, architectural models, videos, and a smaller, triangular-shaped glass pavilion with circular cutouts.
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