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Ryan McGinness Creates Artwork for National Coming Out Day

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An activist named Sean Strub convinced Keith Haring to donate his now-famous image of a person dancing out of a closet for National Coming Out Day, which takes place annually on October 11. This year marks the 25th anniversary of that image, and the Human Rights Campaign is celebrating with a colorful new commission: the organization invited New York-based artist Ryan McGinness to create new artwork symbolizing National Coming Out Day.

“I’m proud to follow in the footsteps of Keith Haring,” says McGinness. “I developed three final images and invite you to vote for the one you like the best.” Voting closes at midnight on Thursday, and the design with the most votes will be released as a t-shirt on Friday.
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And the Winner Is…Chrysalis: Grayish Green Triumphs in Farrow & Ball’s ‘My Colour’ Contest

Slumbering Lepidoptera for the win! A vaguely ectoplasmic, creamed pistachio hue known as “Chrysalis” has triumphed over a highly pigmented field of finalists to win Farrow & Ball’s “My Colour” contest, in which fans of the quirky-luxe purveyor of paint and wallcoverings submitted inspired and inspirational colors that would play nice with the likes of F&B’s “Elephant’s Breath” and “Churlish Green.”

The celadon-meets-Slimer shade emerged at the top of a field of some 800 entries, narrowed to 20 impressive finalists that included colors such as “Jodhpur Blue” (think Yves Klein goes to India!) and “Federal Pink,” a complexion-enhancing match for the rosy newsprint favored by the Financial Times. “It is a beautiful grey/green shade, almost shagreen, which makes a lovely modern neutral,” says winner Samantha Mansell, who will receive 10 gallons of paint in Chrysalis, inspired by the pupa casing of the monarch butterfly. “The sculptural shape of the chrysalis with its gold details also makes it look like a precious piece of jewelry. Natural, stunning, and simple.”
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Farrow & Ball Crowdsources ‘Inspirational’ Paint Colors: Vote for Your Favorite

There is paint, and then there is Farrow & Ball, whose pigment-rich, tightly edited palette includes colors—make that colours—such as “Mouse’s Back,” “Dead Salmon,” “Arsenic,” and a creamy hue known simply as “Clunch.” On September 9, the company will reveal nine new paint colors, and in anticipation of the debut announced the “My Colour” competition: a chromatic crowdsourcing exercise that has since been narrowed down to 20 finalists.

Will the dusky blue of “Old Boat” best the fizzy grapefruit that is “Pink Paloma”? Can “Colonel’s Mustard” knock out (Mrs.) “Peacock Blue,” with the “Vintage Lantern” or a shot of “Absinthe”? Is one of our favorites, the dark blueish, greenish grey inspired by the United Nations charter too close, both in hue and peaceful spirit, to F&B’s existing “Hague Blue”? Hurry up and cast your vote–the winner will receive 10 gallons of their inspirational color, which may or may not end up in a future F&B palette. Voting closes at midnight, and the winner announced on Friday.
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Jamie Isenstein Triumphs in Creative Time Sandcastle Contest


(Photo by Derek Schultz / Courtesy Creative Time)

Armed with bubbles, ice, and Sexy Sex Man, Jamie Isenstein emerged triumphant in Creative Time’s artist sandcastle competition, held earlier this month in Far Rockaway, Queens and judged by an esteemed panel that included Shelley Fox Aarons, Waris Ahluwalia, and Klaus Biesenbach. Isenstein’s “Disappearing Sculptures,” which positioned a live saxophonic nod to the world’s favorite careless whisperer and other ephemeral delights (bubbles, ice) atop three plinths of sand, bested the creations of competing artists such as David Brooks, Sebastian Errazuriz, Ghost of a Dream (Lauren Was and Adam Eckstrom), and Natalie Jeremijenko to take home a “gold” shovel and $500. Rounding out the top three were Esperanza Mayobre, who hoisted the silver shovel for her sculpted raft (an oblique commentary on immigration), while Duke Riley bagged bronze for a replica of a White Castle drive-through that may have made it to the top of the list by virtue of the free White Castle burgers provided to hungry judges.
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Jean Pigozzi Asks, ‘What’s Your Sign?’

Jean Pigozzi (pictured) is an eccentric millionaire with a sharp eye for contemporary art and a weakness for loudly patterned shirts. He needs your help. Pigozzi is expanding his wild and crazy menswear line, LimoLand, with a Zodiac-themed collection, and is looking for a few—OK, a dozen—out-of-this-world astrological designs. Submit your most “original, quirky, and colorful” concepts by the end of the month, and esteemed judges including Pigozzi and Barneys creative director Dennis Freedman will pick their favorites.

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World Monuments Fund Asks: ‘What Does Preservation Look Like to You?’

There’s a time and a place for ruin porn in the quest to preserve crumbling cultural landmarks, whether in Damascus or Detroit, but the World Monuments Fund is taking a more upbeat approach with its inaugural “Everyday Preservationist” photo contest. The New York-based organization has put out the call for “original, evocative digital images that advocate for historic sites by reflecting their aesthetic beauty and importance to the communities in which they are located.” Entries will be accepted through July 31 in five categories: appreciation, adaptive reuse, sensitive urban development, thoughtful tourism, and traditional building materials. Start scouring your digial folders immediately, because the public voting is now underway. Mark Robbins, executive director of the International Center of Photography, will have the final say in selecting the five winners in each category based on on originality, technical excellence, composition, overall impact, and artistic merit.

Rankin Partners with Heifer International for Global Hunger Photo Competition

Heifer International, the organization behind those buy-a-llama-oh-it’s-for-charity-they-don’t-really-send-you-a-llama catalogs, has teamed with photographer and publisher Rankin to spotlight world hunger and poverty with the launch of a worldwide photography competition. The just-launched contest is open to amateurs and pros alike. Rankin will select the winning photograph, which will be showcased at Fahey-Klein Gallery in Los Angeles and published in his biannual fashion and culture magazine, The Hunger. “We hope that vivid and unique photographs will encourage individuals to stop and contemplate the sharp inequalities that exist in our world,” said Pierre Ferrari, President and CEO of Heifer International, in a statement issued this week. Entries must be received by July 2, so start sourcing theoretical livestock now.

Parsons Students Repurpose Luxe Leather Scraps for ‘Wasteless’ Competition

Waste less, want more? That’s the thinking behind Wasteless, a sustainability-minded competition that challenged students at Parsons The New School for Design to transform Poltrona Frau‘s leather leftovers–freshly harvested from the floor of its factory in Tolentino, Italy–into luxe accessories and objects. Designer and Parsons faculty member Andrea Ruggiero led a group of 15 Parsons product design students in the seven-week project, and earlier this month they presented their projects to a panel of judges that included Massimo Vignelli, Metropolis editorial director Paul Makovsky, and Federico Materazzi of Poltrona Frau.

Jenny Hsu emerged on top with “Piqnique” (at left), a woven case for meals on the go that doubles as a leather placemat. Rounding out the top three were Yuna Kim‘s “Miovino” leather wine glass tags and the “Tuft” candle holders (at right) designed by Benjamin Billick. The three winning designers will head to Italy this summer to visit the Poltrona Frau factory and work with the company’s master craftsmen to fabricate prototypes. Check out all 15 of the student designs at Poltrona Frau’s Soho showroom, where they’re on view through Tuesday.

Seven Questions for Bradford Shellhammer, Fab’s Chief Design Officer

Fab made a splash in Milan with more than cushy Warhol Brillo boxes. The online retailer invited designers from around the world to pitch new products for the chance to have them produced and sold on Fab. More than 150 creative types from 30 countries turned out, and now it’s onto New York. In addition to showcasing its new private label alongside collaborations with the likes of the Albers Foundation and Blu Dot at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair, which opens to the trade tomorrow, Fab is hosting another “Disrupting Design” competition.

The fearless leader of the judging panel will be Fab co-founder and chief design officer Bradford Shellhammer. “At Fab, we are constantly reinventing ourselves and rethinking what Fab can be,” he says. “By directly engaging with designers to find the best new work out there, we’re hoping to help even more of our members find things they love.” Today’s ever-changing offering ranges from a Louis Ghost Chair signed by Philippe Starck and vintage Kodak Brownies to a subscription to BirdWatching magazine and a pepperoni pizza t-shirt. Shellhammer paused in his booth preparations (find Fab at #1220 at ICFF) to answer our questions.

How did the Disrupting Design competition go in Milan last month?
We were overwhelmed by the response in Milan, which is why we’ve decided to do it again in New York during ICFF. We had so many great entries from all over the world when we did the call out in Milan. Initially we were planning on selecting three winning designs, but we couldn’t narrow it down so we ended up shortlisting twelve designs which we are working to put into production and sell on Fab–the revenue of which we of course share with the winning designers.

What advice would you give to those interested in presenting their designs to the Fab jury on Tuesday at ICFF?
Take a look at our site and keep the Fab viewpoint in mind when presenting. The winning designs from Milan all embody the Fab ethos–they tell great stories, utilize interesting materials, or have a sense of whimsy. We are looking for designs that will be appreciated by our global community of more than 12 million design lovers.

What are some qualities of a successful product on Fab?
Great products tell a story, elicit emotions, or solve problems. It’s that simple. It needs to check at least one of those boxes (hopefully all three). They can be in any category and at any price, as long as there’e something compelling.

What is a product that you’ve sold on Fab that has surprised you, in terms of expected versus actual interest from customers?
Yves Behar‘s medicine accessories for Sabi I thought may be targeted for a customer older than ours, but we sell a lot of them!
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In Brief: D&AD Judging Week, Six-Second Films, Remade Relaunch, Smart Textiles


Sagmeister & Walsh’s “Now is Better” project, seen here installed at the Jewish Museum, will be included in the 51st D&AD Annual and is up for a Yellow Pencil. (Photo: David Heald)

• On Monday a 192-member jury of leading creatives and designers began the business of judging the 51st D&AD Awards. As you await today’s installment of nominations and “in-books” in categories such as branding, graphic design, and art direction, page through the first five decades of excellence in visual thinking with D&AD 50, new from Taschen.

• The Tribeca Film Festival organizers recently announced its first six-second film competition, challenging amateur and pro filmmakers alike to make cinemagic with the bold, new, yet Super 8ish medium of Vine. The festival’s director of programming has narrowed down the approximately 400 entries to this shortlist. A jury consisting of director Penny Marshall, Vine-loving actor Adam Goldberg, and the team from 5 Second Films will have the final say on the winners, which will be announced next Friday.

• Transform the leather jacket languishing in the back of your closet into something that doesn’t scream “Wilsons Leather circa 1998″ with Remade USA, designer Shannon South‘s freshly relaunched custom service that repurposes individual vintage leather jackets into new one-of-a-kind handbags, through redesign and reconstruction.

• And speaking of textile innovation, on May 1, New York’s Eyebeam presents “Smart Textiles: Fashion That Responds,” a panel that will bring together a diverse group of designers and scientists working in cutting-edge textile research and production–think nanoparticles, circuit boards, and clothing that’s more responsive to changing needs and conditions.

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