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museums

Jasper Morrison, Yoshio Taniguchi to Receive Isamu Noguchi Award

noguchiThe Noguchi Museum in NYC’s Long Island City announced today plans to honor designer Jasper Morrison and architect Yoshio Taniguchi with its Isamu Noguchi award. The honor was created earlier this year to recognize “like-minded spirits who share Noguchi’s commitment to innovation, global consciousness, and Japanese/American exchange,” according to the museum. Motohide Yoshikawa, ambassador of Japan to the United Nations, will present the awards at the museum’s annual spring benefit on May 19, 2015, part of a year-long 30th anniversary celebration. Helping to clinch the win for Morrison? His Noguchi-like blend of a “quiet respect for materials” with a “profoundly and purposefully cosmopolitan” approach. The inaugural winners of the Isamu Noguchi award, a Red Cube-inspired trophy created by Noguchi’s longtime fabricator Peter Carlson, were Norman Foster and Hiroshi Sugimoto.

Pictured: Yoshio Taniguchi and Jasper Morrison (Photos from left: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Kento Mori).

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Paul Chan Wins Hugo Boss Prize

chan
Paul Chan’s Master Argument, a 2013 work made from cords, shoes, and concrete, is currently installed at the Schaulager in Basel. (Photo courtesy Greene Naftali gallery)

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and Hugo Boss announced last night that Paul Chan is the winner of the 2014 Hugo Boss Prize. He will receive $100,000 (plus a a terrific tetrahedral trophy, at right), and an exhibition of his work will be on view at the Guggenheim Museum come sping. Other artists shortlisted for this, the tenth Hugo Boss Prize were Sheela Gowda, Camille Henrot, Hassan Khan, and Charline von Heyl. Established in 1996, the biennial award “is conferred upon artists whose work represents a significant development in contemporary art,” according to Hugo Boss and the Guggenheim. Past winners include Danh Vo, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Emily Jacir, and Matthew Barney.
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Simplify, Soften, Enrich: Hella Jongerius on Redesigning KLM’s Business Class Cabins

As if you needed another reason to plan a trip to the Netherlands, Utrecht- and Berlin-based Hella Jongerius recently completed an overhaul of KLM’s World Business cabins. Writer Nancy Lazarus recently got the scoop on the project.

Hella Jongerius
(Photo: Oliver Mark Photo)

“Humans dream of flying, of floating, and we have extra time on planes. So I wanted to have a place where passengers can dream, be at home, have a craft feel, and a human touch,” said Hella Jongerius earlier this week at New York’s Museum of Arts and Design (MAD). “For airlines it’s all about efficiency, but you also need tactility.” The Dutch designer, known for playfully integrating industrial design with craftsmanship, was interviewed by MAD drector Glenn Adamson on Monday evening in an on-stage conversation that focused on Jongerius’s redesign of KLM’s World Business Class cabins, a project she worked on for two years starting in 2011.

Working on high-end aviation design can be equally challenging and rewarding, according to Jongerius. “There’s lots of exhausting moments on planes when you can’t move around. But as a designer you can act and contribute to solving that situation,” she explained. “KLM was open to different approaches, and with business class we wanted to do extra things since it’s for luxury.” The interior redesign started with the curtains, carpets, and seat covers and expanded to include the seats. The new cabin rollout includes twenty-two 747s and fifteen 777 KLM planes.
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Cooper Hewitt Seeks Nominations for 2015 National Design Awards

nda trophy

The soon-to-reopen Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum has opened the floodgates, seeking nominations for the 16th annual National Design Awards, honoring excellence, innovation, and lasting achievement in American design. For just a short while, until Monday, December 8, you can hoist up your nominee picks in ten categories: Lifetime Achievement, Design Mind, Corporate & Institutional Achievement, Architecture Design, Communication Design, Fashion Design, Interaction Design, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, and Product Design. Nominate away!

Friday Photo: Paul Strand’s Place to Meet

(Paul Strand)
Paul Strand, Place to Meet, Luzzara, 1953 (© Paul Strand Archive/Aperture Foundation)

The Philadelphia Museum of Art reveals the fruits of its 2010 mega-acquisition of Paul Strand photographs in a stunning retrospective—the first in nearly fifty years—that spans from the breakthrough moment when Strand neared the brink of abstraction (his Porch Shadows of 1916 alone are worth the trip) to his broader vision of the place of photography in the modern world. On view through January 4, Paul Strand: Master of Modern Photography highlights his 1953 project in the northern Italian village of Luzzara, where he set out to create a major work about a single community and captured this group of gentlemen meeting amidst spindly chairs and dynamic signage that includes a spirited rendering of geographically appropriate footwear.

Barry Friedman, Richard Dupont Among MAD Visionaries

mad ball 2014

Less than a week stands between you and the 2014 MAD Ball, set for November 11 at NYC’s Pier Sixty, when the Museum of Arts and Design will celebrate not only the one-year anniversary of director Glenn Adamson’s invigorating arrival but also the recipients of its annual Visionaries! Awards. This year’s winners, chosen for their influential creations or leadership in art, craft, and design, are Michael Aram, whose eponymous company is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year; double-take-inducing artist Richard Dupont; gallerist and collector Barry Friedman; and Ligne Roset. Each will receive a new gilded-glass award created by artist and verre eglomisé pro Miriam Ellner, who was featured in MAD’s recent NYC Makers-themed Biennial. Also freshly commissioned for the MAD Ball are a series of live demonstrations by artists and makers including photographer Benjamin Fredrickson, ceramicist Zack Davis, and pastry chef Olivier Dessyn. Proceeds from the MAD Ball support the museum’s arts education programs.

Quote of Note | Frank Gehry

frank g“I’ve always talked to artists about designing art museums. I’ve always heard the same thing, which is the opposite of what Glenn Lowry [of MoMA] and those people always push for: the white pristine box. I guess they don’t know any better. Most of the artists I know complain about that, and younger artists today are refusing to be in that white box—it’s imposing a ‘purity’ that is in fact intrusive. You can see that those galleries at MoMA have failed; they have to redo them now….I’ve been listening to artists for 40 years about what galleries they want. Every artist I know loved Bilbao. Every museum director I know hated Bilbao.”

Frank Gehry, in a recent interview with Jori Finkel for The Art Newspaper

Mark Your Calendar: Beautiful Users

The-Measure-of-Man-Posters

The countdown continues to the December 12th reopening of the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Among the exhibitions that will welcome visitors to the freshly renovated Andrew Carnegie Mansion on Fifth Avenue, which has gained 60% more gallery space in the overhaul, is Beautiful Users. Located in the sparkling new first-floor “Design Process Galleries,” the show will explore the shift toward designs that are based on observations of human anatomy and behavior, from Henry Dreyfuss‘s “human factors” to hacking. Get a sneak peek on Friday, November 21, when curator Ellen Lupton visits New York’s 92nd Street Y (tickets here) to discuss the exhibition and how users are increasingly affecting the design of objects.

Walker Art Center Celebrates 75 Years in 150 Seconds

The Walker Art Center is celebrating its 75th anniversary with a series of exhibitions and programs that highlight the institution’s distinctively curious ways. In less than three minutes, the below video rounds up 75 such questions in evocative, inspiring fashion. Those seeking answers can head to the Walker’s mesmerizing 75th anniversary website or Minneapolis, where Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections, a special exhibition studded with greatest hits such as Edward Hopper’s Office at Night (1940), Franz Marc’s The Large Blue Horses (1911), Chuck Close’s Big Self Portrait (1967-68), and Yves Klein’s Mondo Cane Shroud (1961), is on view through September 11, 2016.

Quote of Note | Robert Gober

(Jonathan Muzikar)
Installation view of Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, on view through January 18, 2015 at the Museum of Modern Art. (Photo: Jonathan Muzikar)

“With the sink, only after I was making it as a series did I realize that I had had, years before, a recurring dream about finding a room within my home that I didn’t know existed. That room was full of sinks, but it was very different—there was sunlight pouring in the room, and there was water running in all the sinks. They were functional. So it was an image that I had a recurring dream about, but it’s not like I woke up and I said, ‘Gee, that would make an interesting sculpture.’ It’s after-the-fact. You look back and you see all these different influences: dreams, people you’ve known, things you’ve read.”

-Robert Gober in a 1989 interview with Craig Gholson for BOMB Magazine

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