AdsoftheWorld BrandsoftheWorld LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser TVNewser TVSpy FishbowlNY FishbowlDC GalleyCat

museums

Barry Friedman, Richard Dupont Among MAD Visionaries

mad ball 2014

Less than a week stands between you and the 2014 MAD Ball, set for November 11 at NYC’s Pier Sixty, when the Museum of Arts and Design will celebrate not only the one-year anniversary of director Glenn Adamson’s invigorating arrival but also the recipients of its annual Visionaries! Awards. This year’s winners, chosen for their influential creations or leadership in art, craft, and design, are Michael Aram, whose eponymous company is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year; double-take-inducing artist Richard Dupont; gallerist and collector Barry Friedman; and Ligne Roset. Each will receive a new gilded-glass award created by artist and verre eglomisé pro Miriam Ellner, who was featured in MAD’s recent NYC Makers-themed Biennial. Also freshly commissioned for the MAD Ball are a series of live demonstrations by artists and makers including photographer Benjamin Fredrickson, ceramicist Zack Davis, and pastry chef Olivier Dessyn. Proceeds from the MAD Ball support the museum’s arts education programs.

Quote of Note | Frank Gehry

frank g“I’ve always talked to artists about designing art museums. I’ve always heard the same thing, which is the opposite of what Glenn Lowry [of MoMA] and those people always push for: the white pristine box. I guess they don’t know any better. Most of the artists I know complain about that, and younger artists today are refusing to be in that white box—it’s imposing a ‘purity’ that is in fact intrusive. You can see that those galleries at MoMA have failed; they have to redo them now….I’ve been listening to artists for 40 years about what galleries they want. Every artist I know loved Bilbao. Every museum director I know hated Bilbao.”

Frank Gehry, in a recent interview with Jori Finkel for The Art Newspaper

Mark Your Calendar: Beautiful Users

The-Measure-of-Man-Posters

The countdown continues to the December 12th reopening of the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Among the exhibitions that will welcome visitors to the freshly renovated Andrew Carnegie Mansion on Fifth Avenue, which has gained 60% more gallery space in the overhaul, is Beautiful Users. Located in the sparkling new first-floor “Design Process Galleries,” the show will explore the shift toward designs that are based on observations of human anatomy and behavior, from Henry Dreyfuss‘s “human factors” to hacking. Get a sneak peek on Friday, November 21, when curator Ellen Lupton visits New York’s 92nd Street Y (tickets here) to discuss the exhibition and how users are increasingly affecting the design of objects.

Walker Art Center Celebrates 75 Years in 150 Seconds

The Walker Art Center is celebrating its 75th anniversary with a series of exhibitions and programs that highlight the institution’s distinctively curious ways. In less than three minutes, the below video rounds up 75 such questions in evocative, inspiring fashion. Those seeking answers can head to the Walker’s mesmerizing 75th anniversary website or Minneapolis, where Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections, a special exhibition studded with greatest hits such as Edward Hopper’s Office at Night (1940), Franz Marc’s The Large Blue Horses (1911), Chuck Close’s Big Self Portrait (1967-68), and Yves Klein’s Mondo Cane Shroud (1961), is on view through September 11, 2016.

Quote of Note | Robert Gober

(Jonathan Muzikar)
Installation view of Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, on view through January 18, 2015 at the Museum of Modern Art. (Photo: Jonathan Muzikar)

“With the sink, only after I was making it as a series did I realize that I had had, years before, a recurring dream about finding a room within my home that I didn’t know existed. That room was full of sinks, but it was very different—there was sunlight pouring in the room, and there was water running in all the sinks. They were functional. So it was an image that I had a recurring dream about, but it’s not like I woke up and I said, ‘Gee, that would make an interesting sculpture.’ It’s after-the-fact. You look back and you see all these different influences: dreams, people you’ve known, things you’ve read.”

-Robert Gober in a 1989 interview with Craig Gholson for BOMB Magazine

Guggenheim Reveals Submissions for Helsinki Museum Design Contest

h_gu

The world is one step closer to Guggenheim Helsinki. The open, international competition for the design of the the proposed art and design museum, to be located on city-owned land in the southwestern part of Helsinki’s South Harbor, is nowhere near its big Finnish finish, but today the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation cut the virtual, Marimekko-patterned ribbon on an online gallery of submissions. The featured entries, which were received from 77 countries and can be filtered using trait-based tags (dome, glass, opaque, concrete, twisted, shiny, and more), are for stage one of the competition. Now it’s up to an 11-member jury chaired by Mark Wigley, Dean of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture, to convene in Helsinki to select six finalists on the basis of their architectural design, relationship to the site and the cityscape, practicality for users (including criteria for the use of materials), and feasibility. Stage two begins next month, and the big voittaja (winner) will be announced in June 2015.

Saturday is Smithsonian’s Museum Day Live!

md live

Whether you’re in Manhattan or Muncie, this Saturday, September 27, is Museum Day Live! The annual event hosted by Smithsonian magazine will see participating museums across the country open their doors to anyone presenting a Museum Day Live! ticket, which are available at no charge here. Choose your participating venue wisely: one free ticket admits two and includes a free year-long subscription to the digital edition of Smithsonian.

Wadsworth Atheneum Receives $750K for Reinstallation of Collections

Wadsworth Atheneum

Did you know that the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, Connecticut is the oldest public art museum in the United States? Now you do. The 172-year-old institution, now in the final stages of a five-year, $33 million renovation, announced today that it has received a combined $750,000 from the National Endowment of the Humanities (NEH) and the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving (HFPG) to fund the comprehensive reinstallation of its collections and to continue related programming aimed at community engagement.

The NEH awarded the Wadsworth Atheneum $400,000 for “the creation of an interdisciplinary gallery with interactive technology” to introduce visitors to the Cabinet of Art and Curiosities: an exhibition of remarkable 17th-century objects, many of them collected by J. Pierpont “Remarkable Objects” Morgan, combined with natural history specimens and other rarities. The space will be part of the reinstallation of European artworks in the restored Morgan Memorial building, slated to open in September 2015. The HFPG grant of $325,000 will fund community engagement initiatives over the next three years through the museum’s “Beyond the Walls/Behind the Scenes” program.

At MCNY, a Look Back to the ‘Mad Men’ Era, Illustrated

What do you get when you cross Norman Rockwell with Roy Lichtenstein? The Don Draper-era illustrations of Mac Conner. Writer Nancy Lazarus previewed the new exhibition of his work and sketched out her impressions.

12_The Girl Who was Crazy About Jimmy Durante_Mac Conner_1953_Courtesy of MCNY.jpg
Mac Conner’s illustrations for “The Girl Who Was Crazy About Jimmy Durante” in Woman’s Day, September 1953 and below, for “How Do You Love Me” in Woman’s Home Companion, August 1950. (Courtesy of the artist)

01_How Do You Love Me_Mac Conner_1950_Courtesy of MCNY.jpgAt the ripe age of 100, McCauley “Mac” Conner is ready for his close-up. The illustrator made a special appearance this week at the opening of an exhibition of his work at the Museum of the City of New York (MCNY). “Mac Conner: A New York Life,” on view through January 19, 2015, provides an in-depth look at Conner’s career along with his working process.

“The period from the late 1940s through the early ’60s was Mac’s heyday,” said Terrence Brown, the exhibit’s guest curator and director of the Society of Illustrators, at Tuesday’s press preview. During the “Mad Men” era, Conner’s illustrations appeared on the covers of leading magazines of the day such as The Saturday Evening Post and the “Seven Sisters” women’s titles, like Good Housekeeping, Cosmopolitan, and Redbook.

“It was a vibrant time and Mac relished it,” said Sarah Henry, MCNY deputy director and chief curator. “Magazines were Mac’s favorite medium since they allowed more creative freedom. That’s also the time when he grew as a designer,” she added.
Read more

Rock Star: Doug Pray on Levitated Mass, the Documentary

levitated mass

Michael Heizer is an artist whose work you tend to stumble upon—perhaps literally, in the case of the bewitching ribbons of rusting steel embedded in the lawn of the Menil Collection—and then can’t stop thinking about. He made headlines in recent years during the installation of Levitated Mass (2012), a 456-foot-long slot constructed on the campus of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) campus, over which is placed a 340-ton granite megalith. That momentous, paperwork-laden process, which entailed a $10 million, 22-city tour for the boulder and its custom-made trailer, is the subject of a new film by Doug Pray (Art & Copy, Surfwise). Now playing in select cities, Levitated Mass weaves together Heizer’s biography, the dreams of a major museum, and the uniting of a city—all while proving that it is possible to make a fascinating film about a massive rock. Pray (pictured below), who happens to be the son of a geologist, made time between screenings to tell us more about the film and its making.

(Diana Rathe)How did you first encounter the work of Michael Heizer?
Long before I knew about the work of Michael Heizer I had seen Adjacent, Against, Upon on the waterfront in Seattle, and, like millions of others, I’d encountered the smaller, running-water version of Levitated Mass in New York City, but I didn’t swim in it, so to speak. My first full, immersive experience was during the early days of our production on Levitated Mass while we were endlessly awaiting for the rock to get its permits and approvals and to move out of the quarry. I drove out to Mormon Mesa, near Overton, Nevada—about an hour and a half northeast of Las Vegas—and spent a half day walking around and inside Heizer’s massive Double Negative.
Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>