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Wanted: Photo Editor to Go Hollywood

Ready to go west, young photo editor? Here’s your chance (and you don’t even have to leave New York). Bonnie Fuller‘s pop culture news hub Hollywood Life is looking for a photo editor to join its entertainment-obsessed team in NYC. The position includes star-studded photo research and collaborating with red carpet-ready editors, along with resizing and retouching photos in preparation for online use. The ideal candidate is a Photoshop whiz with experience using media sites, photo agencies, and stock photography. Be ready to dazzle with your creativity and multitasking skills. Our interview advice? Bone up on box office stats and starlet scandals. Click to apply for this Hollywood Life photo editor job or view the latest Mediabistro design jobs.

The Hollywood sign was erected in 1923 as an ad for the Hollywoodland housing development. The above publicity photo for the subdivision’s groundbreaking appears in Leo Braudy‘s 2011 book The Hollywood Sign.

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Sweet Tweets: Follow Jessica Helfand’s Adventures in Paris

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Une euphorie, s’il vous plaît. (Photo: Jessica Helfand)

It is a land of fluffy monster meringues and artfully displayed legumes, architectural flourishes and taxidermied rodents. Around each corner are enchanting surnames etched in limestone and splendid emporiums, many of them offering a single object—umbrellas, chains—in seemingly infinite variety. There are doted-on dogs and impressively impractical shoes and enough scuffed doll parts as to suggest an elaborate prank by the chortling ghost of Hans Bellmer. This is Paris as seen through the eyes of designer and writer Jessica Helfand, who is well into the 140-day adventure in the City of Lights that she is chronicling—evocatively, tersely, brilliantly—via Twitter (@ParisOneForty). “A picture a day for 140 days. A caption a day for 140 days. Every caption will be—wait for it—140 characters,” she promised at the outset. “There may be video too. And eventually a book!”

Friday Photo: The Leica That Took the Reichstag

(Bonhams)
(Yevgeny Khalder)OK, so it’s the Leica that took the photo of Russian troops taking the Reichstag, but you get the idea! Alas, there is no Black Friday discount on this camera, which goes on the block tomorrow in Hong Kong as part of Bonhams’ droolworthy Leica centenary sale (note to Tom Sachs: there’s also a fine circa-1966 NASA model up for grabs) and is estimated to fetch between 3 million and 4 million Hong Kong dollars—approximately $390,000-$520,000 at current exchange.

While working as a photojournalist for the Soviet news agency TASS, Yevgeni Khaldei used the trusty chrome Leica III to take Raising a Flag over the Reichstag (above), one of the most famous photographs of World War II. There is more than Khaldei’s eye and the Leica’s Elmar 3.5cm f/3.5 lens to thank for the image: taken on May 2, 1945, it’s a restaging of the moment two days earlier when Red Army fighters had first flown the Soviet flag over the Reichstag (Germans had fought back and dislodged the Red Army, scuttling that photo op). And there was also a bit of Soviet-style proto-Photoshopping involved: more smoke was added to suggest that the fighting was still taking place and the soldiers’ looted watches were made to vanish from their wrists and from history.

Quote of Note | Thomas Mallon

weegee cover“I read old photographs for unexpected details, such as the faces in the crowd, the people witnessing what a historical novelist can only try to reconstruct. I keep photos around me while I write the way other authors keep music on in the background; they provide not only evidence but a kind of atmospheric stimulation. I don’t think I could have written Bandbox, a comic novel about the 1920s, without long exposure to that era’s madcap tabloid photography, and I can’t imagine Fellow Travelers, a novel I set during the McCarthy period, without the flash-lit, noirish Weegee photo that went onto the cover of both the hard-bound and paperback editions. For Watergate, the details of dress and facial expression in a photo of ‘the Rose Mary Stretch’—the president’s secretary attempting to re-enact how a gap in one of the Nixon tapes might have been created—told me more about Rose Mary Woods’s agonized embarrassment than any transcript of her testimony could.”

-Novelist and critic Thomas Mallon in The New York Times Book Review

Friday Photo: Paul Strand’s Place to Meet

(Paul Strand)
Paul Strand, Place to Meet, Luzzara, 1953 (© Paul Strand Archive/Aperture Foundation)

The Philadelphia Museum of Art reveals the fruits of its 2010 mega-acquisition of Paul Strand photographs in a stunning retrospective—the first in nearly fifty years—that spans from the breakthrough moment when Strand neared the brink of abstraction (his Porch Shadows of 1916 alone are worth the trip) to his broader vision of the place of photography in the modern world. On view through January 4, Paul Strand: Master of Modern Photography highlights his 1953 project in the northern Italian village of Luzzara, where he set out to create a major work about a single community and captured this group of gentlemen meeting amidst spindly chairs and dynamic signage that includes a spirited rendering of geographically appropriate footwear.

On the Art of the #Artselfie

artselfie“In deciding how a picture should look, in preferring one exposure to another, photographers are always imposing standards on their subjects,” wrote Susan Sontag in On Photography. “Although there is a sense in which the camera does indeed capture reality, not just interpret it, photographs are as much an interpretation of the world as paintings and drawings are.” But what about when the subject is the photographer, with his or her face jutting into the frame alongside a painting, drawing, or other work of art? Then you’ve entered the meta-interpretative world of the #artselfie. The keen cultural observers over at DIS Magazine peg the birth of this self-portrait-with-artwork phenomenon, now ubiquitous at most any museum or gallery exhibition, to 2012, “right as the recent photographic phenomenon known as the selfie reached its tipping point.” Having seized upon the #artselfie as an “aggregated mode of art-tourism and documentation” with a dedicated Tumblr, DIS teamed with Mathieu Cénac and David Desrimais‘s Jean Boîte éditions to publish a book full of them. Recently feted at Galerie Yvon Lambert in Paris, the volume includes an introduction by Douglas Coupland and a discussion between Swiss Institute director Simon Castets and DIS. Order a copy here and then take a photo of yourself reading it for an #artselfieselfie.

Now Read This: Alphabetabum

alphaThe standard alphabet book takes a turn for the nostalgic—and slightly creepy—in Vladimir Radunsky and Chris Raschka‘s Alphabetabum, new from the New York Review Children’s Collection. The benevolent ghost of Edward Gorey hovers over the book’s faux-weathered pages, on which vintage photos of children (from Radunsky’s vast collection of antique black-and-white photographs) are joined by playfully alliterative names and rhymes penned by Raschka. Among the questions posed by the playful tome: Are these children our great-great-great grandparents? We knew “Excellent Edwin Eugene” looked familiar!

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Quote of Note | Mick Rock on Daft Punk

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“They’ve got this aura based on the fact that nobody knows anything about their private lives. They’re just two skinny little French guys: totally nonaggressive, very sweet, quiet, a little bit shy—until they hit the stage with their suits on and they become monsters. Monsters in the high art sense.”

-Photographer Mick Rock in an interview with Matthew Kassel in the New York Observer

Quote of Note | Emmanuelle Alt

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“This story [for the June/July 2014 issue of Vogue Paris] began with Inez [van Lamsweerde] and me exchanging images by e-mail. Sometimes it comes from almost nothing; it might just be a color. When you’re shooting in the sun—you know that strong blue sky in St. Barths—you need a contrast. So I might say, ‘What do you think about red and white?’ And Inez is like, ‘Oh, yeah, sure!’ I’ll send a picture of a red shoe and a René Gruau illustration, which is full of red, and just a silhouette or a little sketch. It’s not always photographs—often it’s a painting or a frame-grab from a YouTube film. Very quickly, we’ll start to build up an image of a woman, and then we can discuss the casting. Some photographers will keep changing their casting or think they need a stronger idea. But Inez isn’t someone who hesitates. It’s like three phone calls and everything is booked.”

-Vogue Paris editor-in-chief Emmanuelle Alt in an interview with Penny Martin, editor of The Gentlewoman, that appears in the latest, fashion-themed issue of Aperture

Visionaire Teams with John Baldessari, Samsung for ‘Celebrity Selfie’ Art Issue

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blue visionaire“I’ll probably be most remembered for putting dots over people’s faces, so its funny to do an issue devoted to the selfies of famous people,” says John Baldessari, who has applied his signature “color interventions” to a suite of celebrity self-portraits for the latest issue of Visionaire. The sixty-fourth incarnation of the shape-shifting publication, creating in partnership with Samsung, is now available in three editions—Red, Green, and Blue—each with a distinct set of portraits tucked in a canvas-clad portfolio that folds out to become a display case. After meeting with Baldessari in his Venice Beach studio, Visionaire founders Cecilia Dean and James Kaliardos recruited the likes of Dustin Hoffman, Cameron Diaz, Miley Cyrus, Marina Abramovic, KAWS, Bill Cunningham, and Gisele Bündchen to contribute self-portraits that were printed in black and white and then altered with embossed shapes and colors created by Baldessari. The resulting images range from the exotic (as when a turbaned Lupita Nyong’o gains a second chapeau in a floating, noseless face) to the serene (the clasped hands of Ed Ruscha, amidst a yellow orb and swoosh of orange). “Now we live in an age of self-celebration and constant surveillance in which nearly everyone carries some form of camera,” notes Dean. “It seems ironic and hilarious that an artist so famous for putting dots over people’s faces would devote an issue to the technology that celebrates face-time.”
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