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Quote of Note | Pete Wells on Keith McNally

cherchemidi

“[O]f course, he worries about the interiors. Cherche Midi’s is lovely. Outside is a dystopian intersection. You’d never know it in the dining room, which feels intimate, almost private, although of course every face is on display, bathed in light the color of apricot jam.

For three decades, Mr. McNally has been rooting around in the same Lego kit: distressed mirrors, chipped subway tiles, bottles backlighted to look like stained glass. In his hands, these well-worn tricks give restaurants the battered nobility of a vintage Saab. When anyone else tries, they end up with a 1986 Ford Escort. Sets and lighting will never be the whole show.”

-New York Times restaurant critic Pete Wells in his recent review of Keith McNally‘s Cherche Midi, which opened in June on the corner of Houston Street and the Bowery in NYC

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Quote of Note | Emmanuelle Alt

vogue paris jj14

“This story [for the June/July 2014 issue of Vogue Paris] began with Inez [van Lamsweerde] and me exchanging images by e-mail. Sometimes it comes from almost nothing; it might just be a color. When you’re shooting in the sun—you know that strong blue sky in St. Barths—you need a contrast. So I might say, ‘What do you think about red and white?’ And Inez is like, ‘Oh, yeah, sure!’ I’ll send a picture of a red shoe and a René Gruau illustration, which is full of red, and just a silhouette or a little sketch. It’s not always photographs—often it’s a painting or a frame-grab from a YouTube film. Very quickly, we’ll start to build up an image of a woman, and then we can discuss the casting. Some photographers will keep changing their casting or think they need a stronger idea. But Inez isn’t someone who hesitates. It’s like three phone calls and everything is booked.”

-Vogue Paris editor-in-chief Emmanuelle Alt in an interview with Penny Martin, editor of The Gentlewoman, that appears in the latest, fashion-themed issue of Aperture

Quote of Note | Johnny Pigozzi

pigozzi“Have you ever had the Heimlich maneuver? I’ve had it many times….Last time I was in London, about a year ago, and I had six mini-hamburgers and then I had a big glass of Coca-Cola and…[makes choking sounds] and a guy came and gave it to me and the thing jumped out of my throat. I said, ‘Where did you learn how to do that?’ He said, ‘I learned it by watching an episode of Friends.’”

-JeanJohnnyPigozzi while on a postprandial stroll with Brett Ratner in Budapest in an episode of My Friends Call Me Johnny, his Esquire TV docu-series

Quote of Note | David Hockney

laurel hardy“Hollywood is here because of the strong light. I noticed that in early Laurel and Hardy movies—especially the one where they’re selling Christmas trees and they’ve got overcoats on—they had very, very strong shadows on the pavement. I knew even when I saw this when I was eight years old, that you don’t get that in Bradford [the British city of the artist's birth]. You don’t get much sun in Bradford. I knew California was a sunny place with good light. And it is. It’s ten times brighter than in England.” —David Hockney

Pictured: A still from the 1929 silent Laurel and Hardy comedy Big Business.

Quote of Note | Daniel Libeskind

Daniel_Libeskind“People used to say, ‘Why don’t you design products also,’ and I would say, ‘I am designing buildings, big projects.’ Then one day a company asked me to design a door handle, and I started laughing because it is the smallest object. But I kept thinking about it and suddenly I had a revelation—why not? I mean, it is something that is part of everyday life. So I said, ‘Sure I’ll design the door handle.’ And I did, and I thought that was it. Then months later I was asked to design a door. And I had this other revelation—first I had the door handle, then a door, then you have to open the door. Then suddenly I realized what an incredible thing I had come across, something that I had never thought about. And that’s how I began designing all type of objects. Large or small, all the things that have to do with design are things we have to use everyday. From there grows the whole idea of the environment. I was lucky to come across these opportunities. And like Frank Lloyd Wright said, ‘To design a chair it is as difficult as to design a city.’”

—Architect Daniel Libeskind

Quote of Note | David Chipperfield

(Mattias Kunz)“There are no indigenous materials anymore. You can find yourself in Italy being offered Indian marble because it’s cheaper, and that’s…it’s just very confusing. Or else the marble is Italian, but it’s being sent to India to be cut, and then shipped back to Italy. It means that unless you’re up in the Swiss mountains, or in the Cotswolds in England, where there are pre-described architectural languages that you should clearly respect, it’s a conceptual rather than practical issue. I do think it’s the case that because of industrialization and globalization everything is gradually starting to look the same, and the question is how can you stop buildings looking like each other? We just made a small office building (pictured) by the railway lines at King’s Cross in London, where they’ve recently dismantled the cast iron gasometers. I was inspired by all that Victorian architecture, which led to us making the columns from cast iron, which is actually a fantastic material. So in one sense, it’s a predictable and arbitrary connection to history, which is not necessarily right or wrong, but it’s a clue as to why you make a building different to others.”

-Architect David Chipperfield in an interview in The Travel Almanac. Chipperfield’s “Sticks and Stones,” an exhibition-cum-renovation prologue goes on view October 2 at the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin.

Quote of Note | Ryan McGinley

Ryan McGinley 2007
A 2007 work by Ryan McGinley.

“I love shooting at sand dunes because people can be at their most playful there, and everything that I was someone to do in a photo that you can do safely and really freely in sand dunes. I like them because of the spatial relationship—you can tell how big the people are and how big the dunes are. I also like them because it’s like blocks of color—ranging from really tan to really white. It’s in your DNA to act extremely childish and be really playful in that environment. You want to roll down them, you want to run around with your hands like you’re an airplane, you want to play tag, and just be free. You want to take your shoes off and feel the sand in your toes. That type of experience is sort of the essence of what I’m trying to capture in all of my photographs.”

-Artist Ryan McGinley in an interview in The Travel Almanac. “Yearbook,” an exhibition of McGinley’s work, is on view through October 12 at Team Gallery in New York.

Quote of Note | Karl Lagerfeld on Large-Format Fashion Books

karl-sketch2“I must say, some are not very beautifully made. They’re coffee-table books for people who drink alcohol. I have nothing against coffee-table books as long as they are well done. They must not look like gravestones on a table. Sometimes they are too big, they come in boxes and things like this. No, a book has to be easy to open and you don’t have to be a bodybuilder to lift it. I like books I can read in bed. Those big tombstones would kill me.”

-Karl Lagerfeld in an interview with Miles Socha that appears in today’s issue of WWD. At his own bookshop, 7L, Lagerfeld gets 5% off retail prices. Notes the designer, “I am very much against the idea that you get it for free because it’s your bookshop.”

Quote of Note | Todd Hido

stieglitz“My photobooks are organized by genre, and they are definitely not alphabetized. They’re sequenced and clustered together based on my twenty-five-year knowledge of who taught who, and who preceded them. It’s almost a little family tree of lineage. I find it to be an interesting way of approaching the collection, because you can see patterns of influence and how they fan out into the world we adore….Believe it or not, I have a strange little hobby of leaving books out and open to certain pages, sometimes for years. One of my favorite books, which has remained opened on my table ever since the day I got it, is Alfred Stieglitz: The Key Set. It’s an exhaustive examination, which I believe includes every single Stieglitz photograph that Georgia O’Keeffe inherited and ultimately donated to the National Gallery of Art. Also, I often create sequences and juxtapositions between various open books; I’ve made some unique connections and combinations that way.”

-Photographer Todd Hido, who has amassed a personal collection of more than 3,200 photography books, in an interview with Aaron Schuman in The PhotoBook Review

Quote of Note | Carine Roitfeld

mlle c“I’m not obsessed with myself….But as a woman, you want to look good in pictures. When I go to the shows, I try to smile. It makes you more beautiful and I think the photographers are nicer to you if you try to make their work easier. At the show, the photographers know you. They call you by name. You get very close to them. One time I was coming out of Marc Jacobs and I missed one step, and I fell but no one took a picture. That’s chic. It’s maybe because I was nice with them, too. I think it’s better to make your relationships with them nice. I will never forget this.”

-Carine Roitfeld, founder and editor-in-chief of CR Fashion Book and global fashion director of Harper’s Bazaar, in an interview with Alexandra Steigrad that appears in today’s issue of WWD

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