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quote of note

Quote of Note | David Carr

stack-of-magazines“For the last six months, my magazines, once a beloved and essential part of my media diet, have been piling up, patiently waiting for some mindshare, only to be replaced by yet another pile that will go unread. I used to think that people who could not keep up with The New Yorker were shallow individuals with suspect priorities. Now I think of them as just another desperate fellow traveler, bobbing in a sea of information none of us will see to the bottom of. We remain adrift.”

-David Carr of The New York Times in his most recent “Media Equation” column, “Riding the Juggernaut That Left Print Behind

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Quote of Note | Robert Motherwell

(Arnold Newman)“My mother was very literary. Also she had one of the greatest collections in America of eighteenth-century French Provincial furniture. She used to haunt auction houses for this and as a boy I often used to go with her. And there was a time when I could date any piece of French furniture within two years. I think it was a marvelous training of the eye because, you know, in the end the difference is the exact undulation of the curve, the materials, and so on and all the rest of it. All my life I’ve used earth colors a lot, especially yellow ochre and raw umber and so on; and I wouldn’t be surprised that a lot of it comes from constantly looking at waxed fruitwood furniture. She didn’t like the chichi town kind, you know, with gilt and all that, but the beautiful waxed fruitwood country furniture.”

-Artist Robert Motherwell in a 1971 interview conducted by Paul Cummings for the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art

Quote of Note | Ed Ruscha

hans memling“I can’t stop looking at this guy, because he looks like somebody on the street, like somebody I know. If you cut his hair a little different, he might be a baseball player—I don’t know. He could be José Canseco. He’s got a certain look that puts him into the twenty-first century. Most paintings of people do not, so it’s really unusual. Especially with Memling’s pictures, they sort of cross centuries. And I like to be aware of that. Every so often I’ll see someone on the street that looks to me like they’re from 1950—they’re dressed like they are today, in today’s clothing, but they still have a 1950 face. And this man has a twenty-first century face somehow.”

-Artist Ed Ruscha on Hans Memling‘s Portrait of a Man, c.1470, during a recent event at the Frick Collection

Quote of Note | Tomas Koolhaas

(Tomas Koolhaas)
Rem Koolhaas in Venice at sunset. (Photo: Tomas Koolhaas)

“Usually architecture documentaries really only appeal to viewers with a deep understanding of architectural concepts and jargon. I think by taking a more humanistic approach my film will appeal to anyone who can relate to other people….I don’t think it’s as black and white as either ‘architecture people’ or ‘general public.’ I think there are a lot of gradations in between. For example, creative people who can appreciate architecture but maybe are not interested enough to be very well versed in technical jargon or abreast of every element of architectural discourse. I think those people make up quite a large group and most architecture documentaries fail to engage them. It’s those kinds of people that my film could manage to reach. I don’t presume to think that a large portion of my audience is going to be people who don’t care about architecture at all, but I want there to be elements of the film that anyone can enjoy.”

-Tomas Koolhaas on the anticipated audience for the documentary (view trailer below) he is making about his father, architect Rem Koolhaas. Read the full interview in the new Rem-themed issue of CLOG.
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Quote of Note | Alice Rawsthorn

ANTE VJONOVIC

“There are toxic words in every field and, when it comes to design, two of the most ominous are ‘sculptural’ and ‘artistic’. Not that there is necessarily anything wrong with design projects exhibiting either quality, but those that are described as doing so seldom do. Instead, they are very likely to be any or all of the following: bland, silly, blingy, pretentious, shoddy, derivative, ugly, ridiculous, or unjustifiably expensive. Check out the dodgier booths at a ‘design-art’ fair to see what I mean.”

-Alice Rawsthorn writing on the difference between art and design in the latest issue of Frieze

Quote of Note | Thomas Tait

T_tait fw14
All in a Delaunay’s work. Looks from the fall 2014 colllection of Thomas Tait, winner of the inaugural LVMH Young Designer Prize.

“It seems fashion may be having a renaissance, where understanding the fragility of creative people in such a high pressure industry is vital to success. Having met some of the strongest designers in the industry through the prize, it’s inspiring and reassuring to see such an impressive assembly of successful creatives. Phoebe Philo who can direct a french fashion house via London whilst raising a young family, or Raf Simons who manages his own brand successfully whilst restoring the house of Christian Dior. To me these are just a couple of the inspiring people who have managed to find a balance at the big breaking point.”

-Fashion designer Thomas Tait in an editorial published this week in the Financial Times

Quote of Note | Kara Walker

(Paul Rocheleau)
The Andy Warhol Museum, installation, Skulls. ©AWF (Photo: Paul Rocheleau)

“The Warhol I’ve absorbed, the Warhol who saved me, is the ambivalent cynic. Yes, human beings are worthless and life is slavery, but there is grace to be had in accepting that, loving what makes up our empty capitalist souls, plus a little tiny bit of death.

There are a lot of angles and surfaces, but when it comes to Warhol, depth is a much harder read; it lasts longer.”

-Artist Kara Walker in Thank You Andy Warhol by Catherine Johnson (Glitterati)

Quote of Note | Daniel Libeskind

Daniel_Libeskind“People used to say, ‘Why don’t you design products also,’ and I would say, ‘I am designing buildings, big projects.’ Then one day a company asked me to design a door handle, and I started laughing because it is the smallest object. But I kept thinking about it and suddenly I had a revelation—why not? I mean, it is something that is part of everyday life. So I said, ‘Sure I’ll design the door handle.’ And I did, and I thought that was it. Then months later I was asked to design a door. And I had this other revelation—first I had the door handle, then a door, then you have to open the door. Then suddenly I realized what an incredible thing I had come across, something that I had never thought about. And that’s how I began designing all type of objects. Large or small, all the things that have to do with design are things we have to use everyday. From there grows the whole idea of the environment. I was lucky to come across these opportunities. And like Frank Lloyd Wright said, ‘To design a chair it is as difficult as to design a city.’”

-Architect Daniel Libeskind

Quote of Note | Eduardo Basualdo

eduardo basualdo
Eduardo Basualdo, La Caída, 2013

“Whereas in the beginning I used to stress the viewer’s process of observation by means of miniature drawings and meticulous models, nowadays I work in human scale in order to maintain a direct relationship with the body. At first, the visitors felt the impossibility of inhabiting represented spaces. Now, through my real-scale installations, people experience the violence of architecture.

The body is what I’m most interested in. I try to highlight the limits of our bodies. I think of architecture as a kind of exoskeleton, which holds and controls us and at the same time establishes unique ways of relating to it. Like looking through a piece of glass but being unable to get the other side of it; confronting the possibility of being crushed by a stone; or finding oneself facing a jail whose walls can easily be walked through.”

-Artist Eduardo Basualdo

Quote of Note | Annie Leibovitz

chaplin“My background as a photographer is as an observer. I’m a terrible director. The performers I have the most rapport with are comedians, who make up a very special group. They’re sort of like manic depressives. I sympathize with them. They are usually also very intelligent. For me, the classic photograph of a comedian is Charlie Chaplin just leaning. That is such an extraordinarily funny picture. It’s as perfect a photograph as you could ever have of a comedian. Chaplin came from silent films. The challenge for a photographer is to create a visually funny picture without it being stupid. It’s difficult to take a funny picture.”

-Annie Leibovitz, whose images—from the black-and-white photograph of Richard Nixon’s helicopter lifting off from the White House lawn after he resigned as president in 1974 to the formal color portrait of Queen Elizabeth II taken in a drawing room of Buckingham Palace in 2007—are collected in a new SUMO-sized, limited-edition book from Taschen

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