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technique

Quote of Note | John Currin

courbet 1871
Detail from Gustave Courbet, Apples, Pears, and Primroses on a Table, 1871-1872.

“I’ve always had this thing about yellow—I don’t like cadmium yellow. I always liked chrome yellow instead of cadmium, which are real bright, chemical-looking yellows, and they weren’t really available to painters before 1870, 1850. So I thought, it’s tacky. It’s like a polyester shirt to use those yellows. And then I was just looking at this Courbet still life and it’s filled with chrome yellow and chemical yellows. So I’m starting to realize that this whole thing about being genuine and authentic is ridiculous. And I’m not conscientious or methodical enough to work that way.”

-Artist John Currin in his recent conversation with James Cuno, president and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust, at the Getty Center. Watch a video of their entire talk below.
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Quote of Note | Fran Lebowitz

(Rodolfo Martinez)“This is an era of immense originality and innovation in machinery. Which is very sad to a person like me, because I don’t care. I’m not saying it’s a bad thing, but it’s not interesting to me. These things weren’t imaginable when I was young. It’s almost as if all of humanity is concentrated on this, and we’re being used for the transmission of these things; that’s what bothers me. You’re 25. Do something that angers me, or surprises me. Don’t keep rediscovering things. Now the culture is made of old things, it’s a collage. Art made out of art is not art. You’re supposed to make art out of life. You go into studios and you see these mood boards or whatever? You think you saw that at Saint Laurent‘s studio? It’s other people’s art. I call that stealing.”

Fran Lebowitz interviewed by Paper‘s David Hershkovits

Quote of Note | James Dyson

“You learn from [negative feedback]. Often it starts a line of development: Well, yes, that person said they want a light vacuum, which is impossible, because motors are very heavy. So you say, ‘We might develop light electric motors—no one’s ever done it before; we must do it.’ About eighteen years ago, we set off on that journey. It took us fifteen years before we launched a revolutionary small, light motor. Negative feedback is really interesting. I enjoy it in a masochistic way.”

-James Dyson, in Bloomberg Businessweek

Illustration of James Dyson and his trusty Air Multiplier by Adrian Tomine for The New Yorker.

Quote of Note | Rick Owens

email

“I prefer e-mailing to phone calls—I like how thoughts can be reconsidered, corrected, and improved in an e-mail. Like an old-fashioned love letter. And instructions can be carefully specified and referred to later. Am I robotic? Maybe. I think spontaneity may be overrated.”
-Designer Rick Owens

Quote of Note | Iris van Herpen


A dress from Iris van Herpen’s “Wilderness Embodied” haute couture collection, photographed by Jean Baptiste Mondino.

“One thing that I really don’t want to be part of is mass production…being aware that most of it won’t be sold and will just be destroyed….I think it’s much more of a challenge to start thinking, what are other ways of creating clothes? 3D printing is one possibility we have now, but I really feel that there is much more [that is] possible in the near future. I couldn’t tell you now what it will be or how, but I really feel that it can be a lot simpler than it is now. It’s a complex process of the sketch to the toiles to the samples to factory to the showroom to the shop to the customer. I feel that it can be a lot easier, and you see it changing with music or video and other things, and I really think that ‘materiality’ will change also in process.”

-Fashion designer Iris van Herpen in an interview (below) with Lou Stoppard for SHOWstudio
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Quote of Note | Os Gêmeos

“Everybody has yellow inside. For us it’s a very spiritual color. It’s something that happens very naturally when we work in the studio, when we are drawing. Everyday we go to work in the room and it’s yellow because of the lights that come in the window. Sometimes in the house of my mother, we take one room and use it as our studio. All our drawings from this time are orange, yellow, red, hot. The night is too cold outside. All the colors you see are how we feel. When you feel the night knocking on your window, you need to be yellow, keep yellow. All the colors you see are improvised, everything we do is improvised. We never know which color we going to put on the clothes or character, it just happens.”

-Brazilian artists Os Gêmeos in an interview with Paper

Watch This: Jolan van der Wiel’s ‘Gravity Stool’

Jólan van der Wiel‘s “Gravity” stools, tables, candleholders, and bowls appear ripped from an enchanted sea floor–or are they Magic Rocks run amok? At once otherworldly and organic, these moody forms are in fact the products of the Amsterdam-based designer’s “Gravity Tool,” an innovation that earned him top honors at last year’s DMY International Design Festival Berlin. “I admire objects that show an experimental discovery, translated to a functional design,” explains van der Wiel. “It is my belief that developing new ‘tools’ is an important means of inspiration and allows new forms to take shape.” Now, just two years out of the Gerrit Rietveld Academy designLAB, he has a “Gravity stool” at London’s Design Museum, as part of the “Designs of the Year 2013” show that opens today. This short film by Miranda Stet provides a luscious look at van der Wiel’s unique process, which is something of a team effort among opposing magnetic fields, the forces of gravity, two-component plastics, and good old-fashioned elbow grease.

Quote of Note | Vera Wang


Looks from Vera Wang’s fall 2013 ready-to-wear collection.

“I try on everything I make….I think when I design ready-to-wear, I’m trying to channel myself. Women designers, of whom I admire so many, have a very special relationship with designing for other women. It’s a very personal journey. You can’t help but bring yourself into it. So if you’re feeling for a certain silhouette–if you’re feeling for a certain dress length or you’re feeling for black or you’re feeling for color–that will affect your work as a woman designer. And it will affect how you feel about other women. So in this particular case as a designer, you’re really channeling your own creativity and trying to bring it to women. When you dress a women for a red carpet event, like the Oscars, or you dress a woman for a wedding, it’s about them. It’s a hundred percent, for me, about the client. It’s about channeling who she is.”

-Vera Wang in a recent conversation with Fern Mallis at New York’s 92nd Street Y

Quote of Note | Mary Katrantzou


Looks from the fall 2013 Mary Katrantzou collection, shown Sunday in London.

“All my prints are constructed through digital technology. Studying architecture made me very aware of the digital construction and technicality of engineering in design, which has really informed my design direction with prints. In my design and thought process, I’m constantly building from the foundations of my initial inspiration, and I often use architectural methods of accumulating designs at phase one. Engineering my prints is very mathematical and technical, and it allows me to envision a 3D shape around the body, sculpting a second skin for a woman. Digital print allows me to experiment with print in a way that fine art and other methods could not. It opens up a huge spectrum for possibility. I can create possibility out of impossibility, surrealism out of realism and vice versa for both.”

-Fashion designer Mary Katrantzou (who studied architecture at RISD before transferring to Central Saint Martins) in an interview with Nordstrom’s Qianna Smith

Quote of Note | Marc Newson


The Azzedine Alaia boutique in Paris.

“It’s one of my little marble fantasies. I started used marble a lot in 2005, 2006–in fact, Azzedine’s shop was one of the first things I did. At the time, no one was really using marble in a contemporary way. Marble was considered a really old-fashioned material. I’d picked up a little bit of experience over the years from going to Ferrara in Italy where they carve a lot of marble. People are always looking for new materials and new technology, like brand new high-tech things, but they don’t really exist. All of the materials that we think of as new materials have actually been around for at least ten or fifteen years. Doing something new is really about re-appropriating something, using a new material in a different context. As a designer you can only really do that if you work in different disciplines. That’s why I like doing all these different things and learning about different things. I designed a range of luggage for Samsonite ages ago, and the technology I used was something I had learned from designing trainers for Nike.”

-Marc Newson, interviewed by Jonathan Ive in i-D magazine

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