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Watch: Casey Neistat Takes the Ice Bucket Challenge

In the wake of the global phenomenon of humans dousing themselves in ice water and donating to fight ALS, there are surely scores of people—those representing other charitable causes—bathed in envy and regret: Why didn’t we think of that, Jim? I told you we should have hired that weird intern with all the Instagram followers! Let’s figure out our own thing that involves buckets…what rhymes with “bucket”? Casey Neistat to the rescue. The intrepid filmmaker, who we last saw doling out advice for traveling avec skateboard, has created this expansive take on the ice bucket challenge, somehow managing to cordon off a Tribeca block to do so.

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Watch: Ai Weiwei Takes the Ice Bucket Challenge

“Ah yes, the summer of 2014, I remember it well,” you’ll tell your robot grandchildren. “The world lost Elaine StritchRobin Williams—tragic! And everyone was dumping buckets of ice water over their heads.” The latest celebrity to take the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge—the DIY dunk-tank-for-charity viral sensation that involves chilly water, a video camera, and the magic of social media—is Ai Weiwei. No word as to whether the Chinese artist made a donation, but he definitely got soaked. Two buckets were required. Watch the scene unfold in the courtyard of his Beijing HQ, much to the delight of onlooking studio assistants.

Watch: On the Art and Craft of Art Forgery

art and craftWhen it comes to films about art forgers, woe betide the documentarian who attempts to top Orson Welles‘s delightfully gonzo F is for Fake (1973), which you can—and really should—watch in its mesmerizing entirety at the bottom of this post (what else are late summer afternoons for?). But the directorial trio of Sam Cullman, Jennifer Grausman, Mark Becker have quite the character in career art forger Mark Landis. After he dupes Matthew Leininger, the intrepid museum registrar will stop at nothing to expose the technically skilled fraudster. The cat-and-mouse game unfolds in Art and Craft, which has been burning up the festival circuit and opens in limited release next month (keep an eye out for showtimes here). Behold the trailer:


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Watch: The Mesmerizing Making of Hand-Painted Street Ads

In a sea of glossy billboards and digital signage, a hand-painted mural can stop you in your tracks. Many of the most strikingly photorealistic ones are the work of Colossal Media, which has whipped out the paintbrushes and scaffolding for companies ranging from Disney and Pepsi to Marc Jacobs and Comme des Garçons. The Motion Picture Association of America’s The Credits has captured some of the company’s painters at work, as they use hand-painted murals to prepare the world for the second coming of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. We think both Leonardo and his namesake would approve.

Watch: Marina Abramovic Teams with Adidas on New Film

Opposing bunches of talented young people shuttle purposefully from one side of a rectangular surface to another. Sound familiar? No, it’s not the World Cup—sorry, the 2014 FIFA World Cup™—but Marina Abramovic‘s restaging of her 1978 performance Work Relation. And hold on to your Sambas, because the film (below), which was shot in Brooklyn by Dustin Lynn and debuted today on Nick Knight‘s Showstudio, was made in collaboration with Adidas. And so the eleven performers, wearing not only white lab coats bearing the monogram of the Marina Abramovic Institute but also Adidas kicks as they go about their competitive task, evoke a team of clinically precise athletes, with Abramovic in the role of wise—and presumably very well-compensated—referee.

Watch: Packing Tips from Casey Neistat

Spend even a few action-packed moments with the invigorating YouTube channel of Casey Neistat and you’ll soon be yearning for an adventuresome escape from the screen: isn’t it about time you grabbed your passport and hopped on a plane, and then a skateboard, bicycle, motorcycle, and surfboard—or at least climbed behind the wheel of a Jeep after a monster downpour? The intrepid filmmaker has followed up his J. Crew-sponsored guide to stylish travel with a characteristically DIY approach to luggage for himself and his bright pink penny skateboard.

Watch Paola Antonelli Discuss Design and Violence

Paola Antonelli‘s twenty-year career at the Museum of Modern Art has been a journey through many facets of design, “from cute chairs and fast cars to video games and now also the idea of violence,” she told the audience at the recent DLD (Digital-Life-Design) conference in New York. Watch her talk from that confab below to gain insight into the darker side of design as explored—and hacked, penetrated, manipulated, penetrated, and exploded—through Design and Violence, an online curatorial experiment that explores the manifestations of violence in contemporary society.

Stefan Sagmeister on Why Beauty Matters

When did beauty become a dirty—or at least obsolete—word for artists and designers? Stefan Sagmeister weighed on the issue in his stimulating—ok, beautiful—presentation at last week’s DLD (Digital-Life-Design) conference in New York City. Watch the video below for an aesthetic journey that goes from the industrial shed that is Memphis’s Cook Covention Center (“Elvis had truly left the building.”) to a consideration of the impact of Sagmeister’s fellow Austrian Adolf Loos to faux Mondrians (can you tell the real from the fake?) to a mesmerizing coda complete with jiggly gelatin typography.

Missed the D-Crit Conference? Watch the Videos

The fifth annual School of Visual Arts MFA Design Criticism (a.k.a D-Crit) conference, “Lingua Franca,” drew an impressive, international crowd to the SVA Theatre, where members of the Class of 2014 presented their thesis research alongside guest speakers such as writer and curator (at Hong Kong’s new M+ museum) Aric Chen, material anthropologist Emily Stokes-Rees, and creator of the MIT Press Mediawork project Peter Lunenfeld. Those that missed—or want to relive—last Friday’s proceedings are in luck: videos of the sessions are now available online. We suggest beginning with novelist and critic Nicholson Baker‘s keynote address, “Wrapping Sentences Around Things”:

In Which André Leon Talley Fondles Tom Ford’s Waistcoat

Style.com and the rest of the Condé Nast crew elected not to repeat last year’s rather awkward livestreaming of the arrivals at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute gala, but they did keep a camera trained on the indefatigable André Leon Talley on Monday evening as he held court at the top of the carpeted granite stairs shouting terse greetings (“Instagram! Patricia!”) and complimenting ensembles. The result is a series of very, very short videos such as this one, in which Talley and Tom Ford discuss the work of designer Charles James, the subject of this year’s spring Costume Institute exhibition; the textile of Ford’s own sumptous white waistcoat (spoiler alert: silk!); and the sartorial preferences of Ford’s toddler son.

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