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Hello, Aquilops! Paleontologists Discover Wee Dinosaur with Face of Eagle, Heart of Gold

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Aquilops_headThe Triceratops, with its cranial ornamentation and herbivorous habits, has long outshone the other -topses and -sauruses that make up the family commonly known as horned dinosaurs. That’s all set to change with the discovery of the 108-million-year-old skull of an Aquilops. With a freshly coined name that conjures a fossil-heavy water park, this creature was the stocking stuffer of dinosaurs: roughly the size of a small cat, Aquilops is estimated to have been two feet long and to have weighed a mere three pounds. The name is a reference to its eagle-like face (“aquila” is Latin for eagle, “ops” is Greek for face), distinguished by spike-like cheekbones and a distinct upper beak bone. An artist’s rendering suggests a certain resemblance to former NYC mayor Michael Bloomberg.
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Gift This: Where Philippe Starck Hangs His Hat

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Of chapeaux and Chapos. FLOS CEO Piero Gandini and designer Philippe Starck (Photo: Stefano Guidani)

What does a self-described “modern monk” like Philippe Starck do when he feels the urge to jettison his headwear—perhaps to work “naked in the bedroom”—but doesn’t want to clutter up one of his “collection of cabins in the middle nowhere”? The designer simply tosses the hat on a “Chapo,” his latest creation for FLOS. The clever, LED-illuminated table lamp not only transforms any hat into a lampshade but also serves as a handy (heady?) charging station for portable devices, thanks to the USB port in the base, where a soft-touch switch makes it possible to control the lamp without disturbing the hat. “When Alec Guinness, James Stewart, and Fred Astaire got home in the evening, with a sharp and elegant gesture they would throw their hat onto anything within reach,” says Starck. “So why not a lamp?”

New Museum Offers Gift That Keeps On Giving: Tattoos by Amanda Wachob

amandaGive ’til it hurts this holiday season, by bestowing the gift of a tattoo session with Amanda Wachob. The Brooklyn-based artist (pictured at left, inflicting ink upon an unsuspecting orange) has partnered with New York’s New Museum to offer a dozen tattoo sessions as part of her “Skin Art” project. For $500 ($400 for museum members), Wachob will tattoo the human canvas of your choice with one of 23 unique designs chosen from a menu of colorful abstract squiggles and brushstrokes she created exclusively for the museum. The experience will be made all the more indelible by a special edition of prints, 20 per session, that visualize the tattoo process: Wachob has worked with neuroscientist Maxwell Bertolero of UC Berkeley to develop colorful ways of capturing the unique time course and voltage levels of her tattoo machine as it inks. We hear sessions are going fast, so e-mail store [at] newmuseum.org to reserve a session.

Design Jobs: Freebie, See’s Candies, Interval International

This week, Freebie is hiring a graphic designer, and See’s Candies needs a graphic designer, too. Meanwhile, Interval International is seeking a graphic artist, and is on the hunt for a graphic designer. Get the scoop on these openings and more below, and find additional just-posted gigs on Mediabistro.

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Find more great design jobs on the UnBeige job board. Looking to hire? Tap into our network of talented UnBeige pros and post a risk-free job listing. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

Twitter Along with UnBeige

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Famed literary critic Lionel Trilling once described Henry James as a “social twitterer.” Sure, he meant it as an insult, but it makes us feel better about having joined the tweeting masses. Look to the UnBeige Twitter feed for up-to-the-minute newsbites, event snippets, links of interest, design trivia, and our exclusive photo of Rem Koolhaas in mid-ponder—it makes for smashing smartphone wallpaper.

Smithsonian Displays 3D-Printed Bust of President Obama

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Watch out, Madame Tussaud’s: the Smithsonian is stocking up on strikingly lifelike likenesses. President Obama is the subject of the first presidential portraits created from 3D scan data, and the works–including a 3D-printed bust and life mask–are on display through December 31 in the Smithsonian Castle’s Commons gallery. To create the eerily accurate bust, a Smithsonian-led team thoroughly scanned the President earlier this year using a Light Stage face scanner (courtesy of the University of Southern California’s Institute for Creative Technologies), handheld 3-D scanners, and traditional single-lens reflex cameras. The data and the printed models are part of the collection of the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, where they join less high-tech life masks, including one of George Washington created by Jean-Antoine Houdon and two of Abraham Lincoln created by Leonard Wells Volk (1860) and Clark Mills (1865).
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‘From a Spoon to a Monastery,’ John Pawson on Design, Stuff, and Photography as Therapy

John Pawson designs more than buildings. “We’ve done bridges and boats and books and ballet sets,” notes the simplicity-loving Brit. And that’s just the things that start with “b”! Pawson is down in Miami Beach to fete his clean-lined contribution (read: stunning condos) to the latest EDITION hotel, the Ian Schrager-meets-Marriott venture that timed its opening to coincide with the Art Basel craze, and stopped in to chat with Nick Knight‘s Showstudio about his views on design, minimalism (a “handy pigeonhole” of a term), the virtues of unadorned space, the therapeutic benefits of photography, and Schrager. “He’s so passionate about getting things right,” says Pawson of the famed hotelier. “Interestingly, considering what he’s done in the past…he does like what I do…and he will fight to make it happen.”

Wanted: Designer Who May Already Have Won Ten Million Dollars!

While we can’t guarantee it will make you any more likely to receive an early morning visit from the Prize Patrol (and in all likelihood employees are ineligible for company sweepstakes), we hereby alert you to the fact that Publishers Clearing House, they of the plentiful pay-by-installment magazine subscriptions and cash prize promises, is looking for an interactive web designer to join its Port Washington, New York office. The winning candidates’ responsibilities will include planning, designing, executing, maintaining mobile and web-based material, emails, and interactive experiences (many of them probably depicting giant piles of cash!). And don’t forget to ask in advance to be paid by direct desposit rather than in giant novelty checks.

Learn more about and apply for this Interactive Web Designer, Publishers Clearing House job or view all the current mediabistro.com design/art/photo jobs.

Pantone Declares ‘Marsala’ Color of 2015

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Think wine, not veal. Redder than russet, browner than carmine, more mischievous than maroon. Today Pantone declares Marsala (18-1438 on your fandeck) the “hearty, yet stylish” Color of the Year. In the wake of picks including Radiant Orchid, Honeysuckle, Turquoise, and Mimosa, it would seem that 21st-century color trends are defined by a box of Crayola “bold colors” markers.

“Marsala enriches our mind, body, and soul, exuding confidence and stability,” said Pantone Color Institute directrice Leatrice Eiseman. “Much like the fortified wine that gives Marsala its name, this tasteful hue embodies the satisfying richness of a fulfilling meal, while its grounding red-brown roots emanate a sophisticated, natural earthiness.” Those eager to embrace the “naturally robust and earthy wine red” can purchase a a Pantone USB drive in Marsala or start stocking up on Pantone paint in the color of 2015, and Amazon sells the real stuff by the jug.

Sweet Tweets: Follow Jessica Helfand’s Adventures in Paris

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Une euphorie, s’il vous plaît. (Photo: Jessica Helfand)

It is a land of fluffy monster meringues and artfully displayed legumes, architectural flourishes and taxidermied rodents. Around each corner are enchanting surnames etched in limestone and splendid emporiums, many of them offering a single object—umbrellas, chains—in seemingly infinite variety. There are doted-on dogs and impressively impractical shoes and enough scuffed doll parts as to suggest an elaborate prank by the chortling ghost of Hans Bellmer. This is Paris as seen through the eyes of designer and writer Jessica Helfand, who is well into the 140-day adventure in the City of Lights that she is chronicling—evocatively, tersely, brilliantly—via Twitter (@ParisOneForty). “A picture a day for 140 days. A caption a day for 140 days. Every caption will be—wait for it—140 characters,” she promised at the outset. “There may be video too. And eventually a book!”

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