What’s happening in Egypt? — Protestors in Egypt are turning out in massive numbers and now have the support of country’s military, leaving the Egypt’s president, Mohammed Morsi, on the verge of being overthrown. With the dramatic developments to the story in Egypt, television networks undoubtedly had live coverage and analysis of the events taking place, right? Well, not really. As HuffPost’s Jack Mirkinson reports, MSNBC, Fox News and CNN were covering the George Zimmerman trial all day and showed very little of the conflict in Egypt. The trial had ended by the time Morsi gave a live address to attempt to save himself from being ousted. Instead of airing the speech, MSNBC’s Chris Matthews showed some footage of the protests before going to commercial, returning with a segment on Michelle Obama and Laura Bush. Fox News covered a story about the Facebook page of a 19-year-old. On CNN, Wolf Blitzer mentioned Morsi’s address and said the network was “monitoring” it, noting that something “historic” was happening in Egypt before focusing on the Zimmerman trial. CNN did have segments from Blitzer and Anderson Cooper on the uprising and MSNBC’s Chris Hayes was the lone anchor from his network to have extended coverage, devoting two segments to the conflict.

Why you should read it: You may have been one of the people forced to go online for updates on what was happening in Egypt.

 

Don’t plot me, bro — NPR and Buzzfeed recently tried to define what makes a bro. But Robert Charette, associate editor of the Washington Free Beacon, writes in a blog post that the two media organizations are themselves “not ‘bro.’” Charette credits NPR for their use of Venn diagrams to explain their bro theory, but criticizes Buzzfeed’s “X/Y Axis measuring between ‘high-brow’ and ‘low-brow’ and ‘mildly bro’ to ‘something-something-we’re-trying-way-to0-hard-bro.’ I made the last one up.” Whoa, bro. In fact, the X axis measures from “mildly bro” to “broier than cologne-flavored muscle milk” (well, Charette pretty much nailed it). Buzzfeed also in the chart, which shows books that bros supposedly read, labels bros as “hilariously overconfident dudes,” which Charette doesn’t appreciate. “Overconfident dudes make this nation great,” he argues after referencing Michael Jordan, Bill Gates and Bubba Watson. Charette also doesn’t appreciate the lack of context with the plotting of all the book titles, wondering what “makes The Great Gatsby ‘broier than cologne-flavored muscle milk.’” Charette said the ideal bro graphic would show that “bros either read ‘Bar Stool Sports,’ or ‘The Chive,’ or ‘Both Bar Stool Sports and the Chive.’” Don’t worry, bro, we made one that will make you proud. Just one question: is the Free Beacon anywhere on the radar of bros?

Why you should read it: Bro, besides standing up for true broism, it has not one, but two GIFs for your viewing pleasure.

Are you really an American?

The Atlantic wants you to prove your citizenship — The Fourth of July is tomorrow, and unhealthy food, fireworks and questionable fashion choices involving stars and stripes will be abundant. So, too, will the National Mall be flooded with American citizens celebrating the 237-year history of the country and the signing of the one of the most significant documents in our history (the Declaration of Independence, if you’re scratching your head). Eric Liu of The Atlantic points out that many Americans “never really thought about what it means to be a citizen.” What if, Liu ponders, citizenship wasn’t granted by birth. Could the average American pass the exam that immigrants must take to earn citizenship? Well, now you can find out if you would pass it, as Liu put together a quiz of American history, landmarks and government. You may want to study up before taking it. It’s pretty extensive and dives pretty deep into certain parts of America’s past.

Why you should read it: Before celebrating America tomorrow, it may be a good idea to brush up on your citizenry knowledge.