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How To Pitch

Brain, Child, the Literary Mag for Mothers, Adds Poetry, Expanded Reviews Section

Brain, Child: The Magazine for Thinking Mothers launched in 2000 and has been lauded for its award-winning content. When editor-in-chief Marcelle Soviero took the helm in 2012, she said one of her goals was to keep the “major tenants of the magazine” in place. That is, she would continue to publish short stories, essays and features that offered a “cerebral experience” for its readers.

There have also been some recent changes that are providing new opportunities for freelancers, such as a forthcoming poetry section, for which Soviero is eager to find freelancers and established poets. In addition, a broader reviews section means writers should send pitches on books with a motherly, literary angle. Just make sure you have an understanding of the magazine. Soviero said:

Brain, Child doesn’t publish the typical how-tos and product reviews found in many service-oriented parenting magazines and websites. Pitches should have a literary quality. Perspectives should be parent-focused rather than child-centric.

For more on what the editors want, read: How to Pitch: Brain Child: The Magazine for Thinking Mothers.

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A Relaunched Good Seeks Multimedia Pieces With an Emphasis on the ‘Global Citizen’

It is rare to see a magazine return to print after stopping the presses, but Good has done just that, returning to magazine shelves in the last quarter of 2013.

Rather than focusing on chasing news stories, editorial director Joshua Neuman says that the magazine has a stronger interest in the idea of the “global citizen.” Since its relaunch, the magazine has become more open to pitches from freelancers for both its online and print components. In fact, the magazine is now comprised of 80 percent freelance content and Neuman says he accepts “as much as possible.”

Each issue is focused on a theme, such as urban sustainability or waste, so it would be in writers’ best interest to pitch accordingly and provide supplementary content. Neuman says:

We are invested in telling stories across various multimedia platforms and exploring new ways of telling these stories. The multimedia content should be intrinsic to the story being pitched. Ultimately, a strong story or irresistible idea has the best chance of being accepted — no matter what medium or media.

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Pitch The Root Stories on Faith and Happenings in the Western United States

The Root, the news website that reports on today’s world from the perspective of African-Americans, aims to not only publish timely, thought-provoking stories, but also to be a “part of the conversation that’s going on in the [black] community,” says managing editor Lyne Pitts.

Writers are encouraged to join that conversation by pitching relevant stories on politics, pop culture, sports and entertainment. But there are other untapped themes that Pitts hopes to expand upon — and could very well get your pitch a second look:

Our folks are people of faith. If you look at any survey, the majority of African-Americans consider themselves churchgoers. We don’t talk about the importance of faith in people’s lives and we don’t have people we go to as freelance writers in the faith community. I think that’s important and that’s an area where we could see some improvement.

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Artful Storytellers of Memorable Facts Can Earn $1 a Word at Mental Floss

For writers who spend hours at a time online clicking through random Wikipedia pages, or reading about the great history of the cheese-rolling festival and its affects on England or the travels of a great piece of art, Mental Floss might just be the right publication with which to share all that knowledge.

Described by editor-in-chief Jessanne Collins as the magazine for readers “interested in learning things they didn’t even know they were interested in learning,” Mental Floss is all about giving its readers an “academic takeaway” via artful storytelling.

Half of the magazine is freelance written content, with stories on subjects ranging from economics and biology to literature. Balancing the academic information and skillful storytelling is important, but the facts in the story are what really seal the deal.

“We love to have memorable facts — the kind of thing that you can’t wait to tell friends or love to pull out of your back pocket while making small talk,” says Collins. Include a couple of those in your pitch, and you’ll be that much closer to an assignment.

For more information on how to pitch for the magazine and its online counterpart, read: How To Pitch: Mental Floss.

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The Latin Kitchen Seeks Writers Who Are Experts in Latin Culture and Cuisine

The Latin Kitchen, launched in conjunction with Latina magazine in 2012, taps into the traditions of acculturated, English-speaking Latinos. The site was created as ”a place to celebrate and stay connected to culture through food,” said editor-at-large Marie Elena Martinez.

The good news for freelancers is that no section is off-limits for pitches. “We love to find new voices,” said Martinez, who added that if you’ve successfully pitched a story, it’s a good bet you’ll stay on the editors’ roster:

Once a freelancer has landed an assignment, it’s likely he or she will continue writing for the site; editors have ongoing relationships with trusted freelancers. In addition to accepting new pitches from them, editors regularly reach out to their established stable of writers to assign articles based on ideas and concepts generated during biweekly editorial meetings.

Writers should demonstrate strong cultural competence when pitching stories to The Latin Kitchen. If you’re an expert on Latin cuisine or culture, you stand a better chance of nabbing an assignment.

For more on the The Latin Kitchen and the stories editors are looking for, read: How To Pitch: The Latin Kitchen.

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Skift Aims to Be the ‘Homepage of the Travel Industry’

Travel writing never seems to lend itself to hard facts or analysis, but, instead, more dramatic tales of great (or terrible) vacations. However, Skift, the website founded by Jason Clampet and Rafat Ali, has a mission to be the hub for travel news — or, as Clampet put it, ”the homepage of the travel industry.”

The two-year-old site publishes stories that are analysis based and thoroughly reported. All departments are open to freelancers, and these cover everything from transportation and hotel news to tourism company initiatives.

And one section is devoted to tech:

“Digital” is another data-driven department that includes tech-related travel stories, such as how travel companies are using apps and other new technologies to boost their business. Clampet said stories covering online booking are often found in this section.

For more pitching tips and the editor’s contact information, read: How to Pitch: Skift.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Smart Articles on Child-Rearing to ParentMap

ParentMap-ArticleParentMap, the Seattle-based parenting pub, is on the lookout for fresh new writers. The mag, which bills itself as the ”intelligent, trusted, essential resource connecting Puget Sound parents and community,” offers a full-spectrum menu of parenting content.

The mag is 80 to 90 percent freelance written and editors say they are open to both new and seasoned scribes. Pitchable content ranges from parenting essays to articles on health and education. Here are a few sections to focus on:

Every month ParentMap publishes a parenting essay in a section called “Voice”; it typically runs from 700 to 800 words. Then there’s the “Ages & Stages” department, which includes 800-word essays on children, specific to their age range: baby, toddler, preschooler, elementary age and teen. Articles in the “Wellness” section cover health topics that impact kids or families (they also run about 800 words). Features or cover stories tend to be about 1,600 to 1,800 words.

To hear more about the mag and get editors’ contact details, read: How To Pitch: ParentMap.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Expand Your Clips With Latina, a Mag That Relies Heavily on Freelancers

It’s tough enough to break into a magazine as a freelance writer; the odds seem even more difficult when pitching to publications that have a niche audience. However, those pitching to Latina have little to fear.

While the magazine’s primary audience is the “acculturated Latina,” the content between its pages is widespread, and editors welcome new writers to send pitches. In fact, about 60 percent of the magazine’s print edition is generated from freelancers. But the subject of each of these categories must be distinctly Latin-centric.

“If we’re writing about food, for example, it’s always going to be about Latin food,” says Dan Koday, executive content director for both the magazine and its online version.

Another important aspect of pitching to Latina is that the writer should do a majority of the legwork.

Koday says that the more work you do for the editors in your pitch, the more likely they are to offer you an assignment. Explain why you’re the person to write the piece you’re proposing, let the editors know whether you have supporting media — photos and video, especially — that could run in the magazine or online, include ideas for sidebars, and explain any special expertise about or access to your subject.

For more on how to get your stories into Latina and the best categories to pitch, read: How To Pitch: Latina.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Tap Into Freelance Work with Elle Décor, the Mag with ‘Fashion in its DNA’

Elle Décor is a magazine that prides itself on a dedication to class and sophistication in the style and design world. With online competitors such as Etsy and Pinterest creating new hubs for do-it-yourselfers to compile their haphazard and crazy amalgamation of products, Elle Décor retains its sense of refinement for its content and its audience.

While the magazine welcomes freelance writers, the style and tone of its pieces limit the pool of freelance work to just about 30-40 percent of the content.

“We’re looking for strong reporters and lively writers. Not one or the other, but somebody who has both,” said Lowry.

Interested writers should pick up a few issues of the magazine and really look through the stories to better understand what works and what doesn’t for the magazine, which Lowry explained, has “fashion in its DNA.”

For more on what to pitch and how to do so, read How To Pitch: Elle Décor.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

 

 

Life Refined Seeks Feature Pitches on Luxury Travel, Style and Culture

Life-Refined-Article1Life Refined is a luxury lifestyle mag with a twist: you can’t pick it up at a newsstand or the grocery store. In fact, you’d have to be a high-end company with wealthy clientele to get your hands on a copy.

This private pub’s content is 70 percent freelance written and editor-in-chief Marlene Srdic says she is always on the lookout for talented new writers. And submitting high-quality images with your story is a plus, since the magazine is photo-heavy. Here’s a snippet of what to pitch:

Life Refined runs about six to eight features per issue that range from 800 to 1,200 words. There’s no front-of-book, so shorter, newsy pieces won’t have a place in this magazine. However, interviews with well-known experts are game. Feature topics include luxury travel, style, home/design, food, wine and spirits, and art and culture. You can also pitch stories related to outdoor hobbies, such as golf, polo and skiing (a recent story described the art of bamboo fly rods).

For more pitching tips, read: How To Pitch: Life Refined.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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