TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Newspapers

NY Times Publishes Error-Filled Front Page

Editors at The New York Times won’t look back on today fondly. Not because of a particularly sad news item, but because of an error-filled front page.

Somehow, an A1 article was published without a sub-headline or a byline. It also began mid-sentence. That’s about as bad as it gets.

The Times’ David Gelles, who tweeted the image, accurately described it as “painful.”

[Image: Twitter/David Gelles]

Dorian Nakamoto Wants to Sue Newsweek

Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto, the man who Newsweek reported had created Bitcoin, wants to sue the magazine over its cover story. According to TechCrunch, Nakamoto is trying to raise the necessary funds to sue the glossy on a site called NewsweekLied.com.

When the Newsweek story ran, Nakamoto told everyone who would listen that he had no involvement in Bitcoin. In fact, he claimed that the only reason he had even heard of the digital currency was because a Newsweek reporter contacted his son about it.

NewsweekLied explains that Nakamoto suffered as a direct result of the Newsweek article:

Dorian’s family was confused by Newsweek’s article. He and his brothers were misquoted. In some cases, words were attributed to them that were never said. In the chaos, his mother believed that the authorities were planning on removing her from her home to put her in a care facility. His estranged wife and children were alienated by the story, which portrayed a person and situation different from their understanding of their husband and father.

Hilariously, donations to Nakamoto’s cause can be made by Bitcoin.

[Image: NewsweekLied.com]

Journalism Student Gets a Crash Course in Newspaper Delivery

SarahFentonTwitterProfilePicIf the Orange County Register is looking for a silver lining to this week’s massive home-delivery debacle, it may want to consider the plucky case of subscriber Sarah Fenton (pictured). As relayed by OC Weekly‘s Gustavo Arellano, Fenton took it upon herself to deliver to her gated-community neighbors the bundle of print newspapers cavalierly left dumped in front by the paper’s new delivery partner.

From Fenton’s Facebook post:

Today would have been day three without receiving a paper, but on my way to school this morning I found a bundle of OC Register papers scattered on the ground outside our community gates.

Read more

Daily News Hires Two, Promotes Six

NY_DNThe New York Daily News has hired two on the business side and made five editorial promotions. Details are below.

  • Colleen Noonan joins as VP, marketing and creative services. Noonan, a former veteran of Hearst, was most recently a consultant with Pitney Bowes.
  • Melanie Schnuriger has been named VP, product development. She was most recently a managing director at SixAgency.
  • On the editorial side, Kristen Lee has been promoted to director of digital development. She was previously digital integration editor.
  • Zach Haberman has been upped to from news editor, digital, to deputy managing editor, digital.
  • Andy Clayton has been promoted to deputy managing editor, digital sports.
  • Cristina Everett has been promoted to deputy managing editor, digital entertainment. She was most recently senior editor, entertainment.
  • Christine Roberts has been promoted to editor, mobile and emerging products.
  • Brad Gerick has been promoted to director of social media. He most recently served as social media manager.

Orange County Register Has a Weekend on Par with Angels

oc registerOn the one hand, it’s a victory for print journalism. Dozens of Saturday and Sunday newspaper subscribers outraged that their papers were not delivered. On the other hand, the Orange County Register‘s solution only added fuel to the ire.

“Free copies of the Sunday and Saturday papers are available in the OC Register lobby at 625 N. Grand Avenue, Santa Ana until 5 p.m. today,” the paper posted Sunday on Facebook, prompting a string of angry reader comments and a different tack from the paper. One that sounded a lot like the remarks being made by members of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim after being swept out of the MLB playoffs Sunday by the Kansas City Royals:

No excuses. We are sorry for the lack of delivery in your neighborhood, and the inconvenience this has caused you and family members this weekend. The only acceptable solution is receiving your newspaper and timely delivery to all subscribers… and we’re working toward that goal. We are correcting the breakdowns in routes, and are actively responding to each person who has contacted us at customerservice@ocregister.com.

Read more

Peter Canellos Joins Politico

Peter Canellos, a 26-year veteran of The Boston Globe, has been named Politico’s new executive editor. Canellos announced he was leaving the Globe last month.

Canellos was named the Globe’s editorial page editor in 2009. Prior to that he served as the paper’s Washington bureau chief.

In a memo announcing the move, Politico’s editor Susan Glasser wrote, “Peter’s had a long record of accomplishment at the Globe – and you should look at all the wonderful things his many hires over the years had to say about Peter when he recently announced he was leaving as the paper’s editorial editor.”

Highlights from Sam Sifton’s Reddit AMA

Sam Sifton, The New York Times’ food editor, took part in a Reddit AMA. Below are some of our favorite exchanges.

On the mood at the Times after massive buyouts/layoffs were announced:

We’re okay here. Newspaper people are a dark lot, generally speaking, so bad news is often greeted with a shrug. Could be worse. But there’s an undercurrent of optimism on my desk as well: We’re really excited about Cooking, and hope that it can help us weather the storm.

On Anthony Bourdain:

I have met him! (True fact: His mom was a copy editor here at the Times.) He sent me a story when I was an editor at New York Press. I loved it. We put it on the cover. Then the boss editor came back from vacation and spiked it. Bourdain took the story to The New Yorker. It became a book you may have heard of: Kitchen Confidential. Later we would meet again on a dais, where we absolutely ROASTED Alan Richman, the GQ restaurant critic.

Read more

NY Times Cuts Hit Business Side First

The New York TimesThe Great New York Times Staffing Cuts of 2014 have begun. Capital New York reports that somewhere between 20 and 25 business staffers have been let go, as Times managers informed them their roles were being eliminated.

On Wednesday, the Times announced that the newsroom was going to lose 100 staffers. If buyout packages are not accepted, layoffs will ensue.

As the New York Post reports, Times staffers must submit a request for a severance package by October 17. They then have until December 1 to decide if they’d like to accept the offer.

If 100 staffers don’t agree to the buyouts, December 2 will be a dark day at the paper.

NY Post Settles ‘Bag Men’ Lawsuit

NY_NYP122-277x300The New York Post has finally paid for its idiotic and disgusting decision to imply that Salaheddin Barhoum and Yassine Zaimi were responsible for the Boston Marathon bombing. The two men sued the Post after it published a cover labeling them “Bag Men.” That lawsuit was just settled, according to The Associated Press.

When the Post cover hit newsstands, little information was known about who committed the terrorist attack. Barhoum and Zaimi immediately felt the wrath of people who wrongfully blamed them after seeing their faces plastered on the cover of the paper.

Read more

NY Times to Cut 100 Newsroom Jobs, Shutter NYT Opinion

This is not going to be a good day for many New York Times staffers. The paper plans to cut a whopping 100 people from its newsroom. The last time the Times let go of this many people was in 2009.

The reduction in staff is — of course — a cost-cutting move. ”The job losses are necessary to control our costs and to allow us to continue to invest in the digital future of The New York Times, but we know that they will be painful both for the individuals affected and for their colleagues,” read a note from Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger and CEO Mark Thompson.

The Times plans to offer buyouts to staffers, but will resort to layoffs if enough people don’t accept the deals.

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>