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Obituaries

News 12 Anchor Judy Martin Has Died

JudyMartinNews 12 Long Island anchor and reporter Judy Martin has died. Martin, 49, recently had knee surgery and had told friends that pain medication made her woozy. An autopsy will determine the cause of death.

Martin, who had been with News 12 since 1988, was also the founder of WorkLifeNation.com which advocated for a better work-life balance. She was a contributor to Forbes.com and had often appeared on CNBC Radio and NPR.

On News 12 this morning, the Long Island native was remembered as “a spiritual person who was truly one of a kind. She had a great sense of humor and loved her job. And we loved her.”

Just hours before she died Friday evening, Martin sent this Tweet:

Update (March 5):
Judy Martin’s sister Mary, via email, has given FishbowlNY the following update with regards to the cause of death:

The medical examiner said the following words: “brain bleed, cause pending,” and that this is under the category of natural causes. We were told it would take many weeks to learn anything else, and also that we might never know the cause of the bleed.

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Longtime WNBC Reporter John Noel Dies

WNBC reporter John Noel has died, our sister site TVSpy reports.

“Our WNBC family sends its thoughts and prayers to John’s family. He will be sincerely missed,” the NBC owned station said in a statement.

WNBC said Noel was diagnosed with “a serious illness” two years ago. TunedIn’s Jerry Barmash reports Noel was suffering from brain cancer.

He will be remembered this evening at the Voices Against Brain Cancer event at The Hammerstein Ballroom.  Reporter Juliet Papa, from 1010WINS, will be emceeing. He was a recipient of a VABC award.

Noel, a Brooklyn native, joined WNBC in 1998 as a general assignment reporter. He had previously worked at WJBK in Detroit and KSDK in St. Louis.

Noel has won a number of broadcasting awards, including the New York State Broadcasters Award in 1999 and the Tenants Council of Brooklyn Award for Excellence in Broadcast Television. During his four years in the United States Air Force, he worked as a radio programmer and announcer for the Armed Forces Radio and Television Network.

Read the full WNBC statement after the jump. Read more

Former Ms. Magazine Editor Mary Thom Dead at 68

Mary Thom, the former editor of Ms. magazine, died on Friday in a motorcycle crash in Yonkers, the Associated Press reported. She was 68.

The avid motorcyclist was riding her 1996 Honda Magna 750 on Friday evening when she crashed on the Saw Mill River Parkway, her nephew Thom Loubet told the newswire.

Thom lived for decades in New York City and served as an editor for Ms. for nearly 20 years before leaving the feminist magazine in 1992.

She worked on the glossy, which began as an insert in New York magazine, into a feminist powerhouse read in the 1970s, but struggled to leverage commercial success with its ideological voice.

Since leaving the magazine, Thom has served as editor-in-chief of the Women’s Media Center’s features department, publishing reports and op-eds from contributors around the world.

For more details read the full AP report here.

h/t The Huffington Post

Image: [Ricky.org]

 

Veteran of Bloomberg Radio and CNBC, Jim Kingsland Dies at 49

Jim Kingsland had business news in his blood. He worked for every major financial media company, including Bloomberg LP, from 1992 to 2006. Kingsland died this week at age 49 after a long illness.

He had severe diabetes, which led to a liver transplant several years ago. His eyesight was poor and his pancreas was compromised.

At Bloomberg for much of the time, he was news director at WBBR.

Wes Richards was host of Bloomberg on the Weekends.

“He had the right stuff, he did the right thing,” Richards tells FishbowlNY. “He was a pleasure to work for and work with and an island of calm and rationality in a sea of chaos.”

Kingsland bookended Bloomberg with FNN/CNBC and Fox Business Network from 2007 to 2010 as assignment editor.

The business journalist also had a passion for numismatics–the study of currency–founding JK Numismatics in November 2006, according to his LinkedIn page.

Kingsland worked at a pair of small suburban stations early in his career. He also was a 1010 WINS traffic reporter via Shadow Traffic in the mid 1980s.

Jim is survived by his wife, Melissa, and three children, Rachel, Benjamin, and Nathan.

Photo credit: www.coinnews.net

WCBS-TV Leads Coverage of Ed Koch Funeral

Offering a serious tone on this morning’s funeral of Mayor Koch, New York stations covered the entire solemn proceedings.

But, WCBS/Channel 2 went one step further. Channel 2 brought in its main anchor team of Maurice DuBois and Kristine Johnson to lead the 11 a.m. coverage.

At WABC/Channel 7, Bill Ritter joined morning anchor Lori Stokes for its special reporting.

Related: FishbowlNY, Memories of Longtime Media Favorite, Mayor Ed Koch

Otherwise, it was the morning talent that handled the coverage. Good Day New York anchors Rosanna Scotto and Greg Kelly hosting the programming that took WNYW viewers to Temple Emanu-El. Sister station WWOR stayed with it regular lineup.

WPIX/Channel 11 opted fot its usual “must see” daytime TV, starting with Jerry Springer.

Michael Gargiulo and Darlene Rodriguez anchored for WNBC.

In addition, WLNY was used as the way station for WCBS shows pre-empted by the special coverage.

 

Memories of Longtime Media Favorite, Mayor Ed Koch

His style was brash and it was all New York! Edward Irving Koch is being laid to rest today. He died Friday at age 88 of congestive heart failure. Koch, a three-term mayor from 1978 to 1989, was a friend to the media, always good for a quote.

Rich Lamb covered Koch’s entire run as mayor for WCBS-AM. Although Koch was ill for the past several months, getting shuttled in and out of the hospital, Lamb was not fully prepared to learn of his passing.

“The phone went off at 6:15 [a.m.], and the first thing I heard was my own obit that I recorded yesterday because we decided we’d better have something ready to go,” Lamb tells FishbowlNY.

The situation appeared grave when Koch was transferred to the ICU at New York Presbyterian-Columbia Hospital.

Before Lamb could wipe the sleepy dust from his eyes, there was a live report awaiting him on WCBS at 6:20.

“As I began to speak on the air I choked up and it really surprised me,” Lamb admits.

Read more

Longtime WNEW-AM Personality Bob Jones Remembered for Demeanor, Champion of Pop Standards

Lost in the holiday fanfare was the passing of a longtime radio host on WNEW 1130. Bob Jones was 70. The family’s obituary placed in The New York Times on January 4 listed Jones’ cause of death as complications from cancer.

Jones, for parts of three decades, had hosting stints on WNEW mainstays–The Make Believe Ballroom and The Milkman’s Matinee. He remained an advocate of the “Great American Songbook,” playing the likes of Frank Sinatra and Rosemary Clooney (George’s aunt). He remained at WNEW until the end in 1992 when Bloomberg Radio took over the frequency.

One of the many colleagues that intersected with Jones is market veteran Bob Gibson. The retired newsman worked with Jones at WNEW.

“He was pleasant and always easy to get along with, but perhaps his most endearing trait was his love for the music he played and the care he took in telling stories about a particular singer or arrangement.”

In his later years, Jones was a midday announcer at classical WQXR and morning man at WQEW until Disney took over in 1998.

Read more

FishbowlNY In Memoriam: 2012

The New Year is just days away, it’s a time for many to take stock, to think of better times ahead. It’s also an opportunity to reflect on those media people whom we lost this year.

Among them in our memory, radio lost a couple of pioneering personalities, TV lost a reporter, who quietly became a civil rights activist, and an executive who made his mark in public television in a second career.

Here’s a look at FishbowlNY In Memoriam: 2012

Robert Kotlowitz — After a long run in publishing, including the managing editor at Harper’s Magazine, Kotlowitz was tabbed to lead the upstart WNET/Channel 13. He was named the station’s first VP of programming and broadcasting in 1971.

  • R. Peter Straus — He oversaw WMCA during its heyday, turning the family business into the number one station in New York in the late 1950s.
  • Al Brady Law — A veteran radio programmer, who achieved his biggest brush with greatness as DJ and assistant program director at WNBC.
  • Judith Crist — A renaissance woman, who could be a film critic for the TV Guide, or on TV, the Today Show. Earlier in her career, Crist was entertainment reporter for the now-defunct New York Herald Tribune.
  • Warner Fusselle — The only Brooklyn Cyclones play-by-play announcer until his death, Fusselle was also known as the narrator for This Week in Baseball.
  • Dom Valentino — Largely lost to history, Valentino was the Yankees, Nets, and Islanders radio voice in the mid-1970s.

Read more

Cavalconte: Dave Brubeck Brought ‘Real Stardom’ to Jazz Scene

Dave Brubeck was composer and pianist, but that barely scratches the surface of his illustrious career. Brubeck passed away yesterday in a Norwalk, Connecticut hospital. He was one day shy of turning 92.

Jazz and Brubeck were one and the same. He spanned the entire jazz scene in America after World War II. He formed the Dave Brubeck Quartet in 1951. By 1954, Brubeck reached a historic milestone when he was chosen as the first modern jazz musician to grace the cover of Time magazine.

If Time was Brubeck’s “arrival,” his popularity reached its zenith with the seminal album Time Out in 1959. It marked the first jazz LP to crack 1 million in sales.

The album includes Brubeck’s signature piece Take Five, which also became the quartet’s theme.

Paul Cavalconte played Take Five and other Brubeck riffs during his stint at WQCD.

“Take Five” was the most covered original jazz title on CD 101.9,” Cavalconte tells FishbowlNY. “I think we played about five or six versions, counting the original.”

Read more

Robert Kotlowitz, WNET’s First VP of Programming, Dies at 87

Channel 13 is making preparations for a huge celebration next month, marking the 50th anniversary of the New York City public television station. But today the station pauses to remember Robert Kotlowitz, an early executive at WNET.

Kotlowitz died over the weekend at his Manhattan home, a WNET spokeswoman confirms to FishbowlNY. He was 87.

As WNET was beginning its second decade as an educational force, Kotlowitz was exiting his role as managing editor at Harper’s Magazine. In 1971, he was named the station’s first vice president of programming and broadcasting.

Kotlowitz was instrumental in launching several PBS shows, among them the MacNeil-Lehrer Report, which he got the idea for after they hosted the Watergate hearings on PBS. They debuted nationally in 1975. More recently, the broadcast has been retitled PBS Newshour.

In 1981, while WNET struggled financially,  it was Kotlowitz’s idea to invest $500,000 in a British series. Brideshead Revisted would become one of television’s most successful shows in history, The New York Times writes. In 2000, the serial placed 10th on a list of the 100 Greatest British Television Programs. In 2000, Time magazine recognized Brideshead as one of the 100 Best TV Shows of All Time.

Kotlowitz, interviewed in April for WNET’s 50th anniversary, was still unsure why he joined WNET.

“I ask myself [that] over and over again, even at this late point in my life,” Kotlowitz said.

Read more

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