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Whoopsie Daisy!

BET Suspends Producer for Blue Ivy Joke

On Monday’s edition of BET countdown show 106 & Park, the hypothetical thoughts of Jay Z and Beyonce‘s daughter were briefly explored. Guest host Karrueche Tran, as the little girl, joked: “I really did wake up like this, because my parents never comb my hair.”

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On Tuesday, the president of the network apologized via Twitter. And, per AP music editor Mesfin Fekadu, further action was also taken:

A source at BET, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the person was not allowed to discuss the matter publicly, said the [show] producer was suspended.

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New York Review of Books Issues Retraction

MartinFillerNYRBHedA defamation lawsuit filed last week by world-renowned London-based architect Zaha Hadid certainly got the defendants’ attention. On Monday, the New York Review of Books posted a letter from article author Martin Filler. It reads:

In my review of Rowan Moore’s Why We Build: Power and Desire in Architecture [NYRB, June 5], I quoted comments by the architect Zaha Hadid, who designed the Al Wakrah stadium in Qatar, when she was asked in London in February 2014 about revelations a week earlier in The Guardian that hundreds of migrant laborers had died while working on construction projects in Qatar. I wrote that an “estimated one thousand laborers… have perished while constructing her project thus far.”

However, work did not begin on the site for the Al Wakrah stadium until two months after Ms. Hadid made those comments; and construction is not scheduled to begin until 2015. There have been no worker deaths on the Al Wakrah project and Ms. Hadid’s comments about Qatar that I quoted in the review had nothing to do with the Al Wakrah site or any of her projects.

I regret the error.

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Sportswriter Catches Up to Major Elle Embarrassment

Collector’s item!

Per Yahoo Canada sportswriter Stephanie Myles, owner of the delightfully titled column “Eh Game,” Elle Québec served it straight into the net with a portion of their August issue. In the print magazine, a pair of photos of Maria Sharapova were used to illustrate the one page of cover notes about Quebec-born tennis player Eugenie Bouchard.

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The good news for Elle PQ is that they displayed Bouchard properly on the cover and elsewhere in the August issue. From Myles’ report:

All kidding aside, it sort of ruins what was a pretty nifty piece of PR for Bouchard on her home turf. But she does look stunning in the pics that are actually of her.

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A Carol Vogel Postscript

ManetLePrintempsOn Friday, the New York Times added the following correction to Carol Vogel‘s August 1 print article “Summer Treats in the Met’s European Galleries:”

Correction: August 8, 2014
A report in the Inside Art column last Friday about plans by Christie’s to auction Manet’s “Le Printemps” in November referred incorrectly to the painting’s history. It was not included in the exhibition “Impressionism, Fashion and Modernity,” which opened at the Musée d’Orsay in Paris in 2012 and traveled to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Somehow, Vogel confused Edouard Manet‘s 1881 painting “Le Printemps” (above) with the fact that “Impressionism, Fashion and Modernity” made use of a photographic reproduction of an 1870s engraving of Paris department store Printemps. From Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide‘s review of the 2012-13 exhibit’s Chicago stop:

The next gallery focuses on the consumer’s role in creating the fashion industry. Because this is a complex, historical topic, the curators and designers chose to set the scene with a wall-sized photo-reproduction of an engraving showing the interior of Le Printemps, one of the most popular department stores in Paris. Against this backdrop were quotations about the rise of the department store and its influence on French consumer culture in the nineteenth century. Emile Zola’s 1883 novel, Au Bonheur des Dames served as a prime example of what was then a new building type, and one that was surprisingly controversial at the time.

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Post Headline Mangles Hillary Clinton Remarks

The Web headline for today’s New York Post pick-up of Hillary Clinton‘s interview with The Atlantic‘s Jeffrey Goldberg gets it a little less wrong. It reads: “Hillary Slams Obama for ‘Stupid’ Foreign Policies.”

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But per Brooklyn-based Business Insider politics reporter Colin Campbell, the front page of today’s print editions (above) is completely off the transcription track:

The phrase “stupid policy” doesn’t appear anywhere in The Atlantic‘s 6,200-word transcript of the Clinton interview where she criticized President Barack Obama.

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‘Clam Chowder Wars’ Spark NYT Reader Woes

Sometimes, the perils of posting a New York Times Magazine piece three-five days ahead of the print bundle hardly seem worth it.

Case in po(in)t: “The Clam Chowder Wars.” About an hour ago, article author Sam Sifton chimed in to the comments as follows:

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Post Typos Staff Reporter’s Byline

Who is this New York Post reporter, Lia Eustachwich? A click on her hyperlinked byline reveals just one piece – today’s somber report titled “Couple Starved and Beat Daughter for Two Years: DA.”

It turns out that the bylined journalist is in fact Lia Eustachewich. In this single, slightly embarrassing instance, the Post accidentally rendered the second “E” in Eustachewich silent. The reporter is having fun with the flub.

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NYT Back in ‘Unchartered’ Territory

NYAfterDeadlineLogoIn the very last paragraph of a recent New York Times item, Ana Romero, a reporter who covers Spain’s royal family for Madrid-based paper El Mundo, is quoted as follows:

“On paper, [Prince] Felipe is clearly our best prepared king,” said Ms. Romero, the journalist. “But we’re still entering unchartered territory in terms of predicting what kind of king — and this at a fragile moment for the monarchy and Spain.”

As NYT deputy news editor Philip B. Corbett notes today, the correct word is “uncharted”, not “unchartered.” Even though the latter came by means of a third-party quote, he writes that it should have been corrected.

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Anthony Weiner Favorites His Way to More Trouble

Some Carlos Danger‘s never learn.

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Per a blog item by The Village Voice‘s Anna Merlan, disgraced New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner is today, also, a disgraceful Twitter user. You see, he didn’t apparently realize that everyone can view – unless an account is protected – his Twitter favorites:

At about 8 a.m. today, Anthony Weiner had 27 Twitter favorites. They included some tweets about hockey (he’s a fan) and some compliments on his new-ish BusinessInsider.com column (he writes about politics and hockey).

Oh, and at least six photos of this Orange County, California woman, who goes by ParisDylan550 on Instagram and ParisRoxanne0 on Twitter.

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CNN.com Travel Article Resurrects Shea Stadium

As CNN points out at the top with an Editor’s Note, the article “10 of the World’s Most Underrated Cities” was originally published in May 2012 and has been updated two years later for another summer gander.

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On the plus side, Queens leads off the list, and still comes ahead of the hot spot known as Isfahan, Iran. On the minus side, the article text touts Shea Stadium as a great place to catch a Mets game. And that, in turn, has further upped the reader comments total:

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