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Morning Media Newsfeed: Bartiromo Joins FBN | Bloomberg Layoffs | Don Lemon Promoted

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Maria Bartiromo Leaving CNBC for FBN (TVNewser)
Maria Bartiromo is leaving CNBC to join Fox Business. “After 20 years of groundbreaking work at CNBC, Maria Bartiromo will be leaving the company as her contract expires on Nov. 24,” a CNBC spokesperson tells TVNewser. “Her contributions to CNBC are too numerous to list but we thank her for all of her hard work over the years and wish her the best.” Capital New York Bartiromo was one of CNBC’s first breakout stars, becoming a fixture in the financial news world and garnering the nickname “Money Honey” along the way. She marked her 20th anniversary at the channel last month. NYT Bartiromo is expected to work on a program about the day’s developments on Wall Street. Her new deal is also expected to include exposure on the far-more-watched Fox News. The signing is a coup of sorts for Fox Business, which has struggled to establish a profile. Last week, Fox Business averaged fewer than 10,000 viewers in the group that attracts advertisers, those between the ages of 25 and 54. CNBC had more than three times as many with 31,000. Reuters Bartiromo has won two Emmy awards and written several books as well as columns for magazines and newspapers, including USA Today. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media In a statement to Politico, Bartiromo said she was “incredibly proud” of what the CNBC had accomplished over the last two decades. “I want to thank all the people at CNBC who have been with me on this journey, and of course the viewers and investors everywhere for making me love every minute of it,” she said.

Bloomberg Lays Off Staff in Sports, Culture (NYT)
Bloomberg News started laying off and reassigning employees on Monday, seeking to emphasize areas that promote growth and focus more on core subjects like finance and government. Also on Monday, Bloomberg said that a reporter based in Hong Kong who had worked on a controversial article about China, and who had been suspended since last week, had left the company. NY Observer Among those who are no longer part of the news organization are technology columnist Rich Jaroslovsky and book-review editor Laurie Muchnick, both of whom announced on Twitter that they had been laid off Monday. Some areas of coverage that the company has decided to say no to are arts and sports. But the company is beefing up its “first word” and emerging markets sections — apparently, those are areas that Bloomberg News would like to own. FishbowlDC As one of the biggest round of layoffs in Bloomberg LP’s history makes itself felt across the country, sources tell FishbowlDC that less than half a dozen DC-based jobs were affected. We have also learned that as part of the restructure, Bloomberg’s DC operation will become the editing hub for their Projects team under Robert Blau, and could see growth in the future.

Don Lemon Gets Primetime Run on CNN (TVNewser)
CNN is giving Don Lemon a program in primetime. TVNewser has learned beginning early next month, Lemon will host a half-hour show at 11 p.m. ET. Lemon currently anchors weekend evenings for CNN and is being tapped as a fill-in anchor for Erin Burnett when she goes on maternity leave soon. Mediaite It will be a one-topic show tackling important issues of the day, either reported or vastly underreported, from Lemon’s unique perspective.

Atlantic Wire Relaunches Tuesday Morning as The Wire (Capital New York)
Website relaunches are notorious for creating headaches in the days and hours before they go live, between staff training, functionality testing and inevitable last-minute design fixes. But the relaunch of The Atlantic Wire as The Wire had Atlantic Media executives reaching for the asprin months ago. “Getting thewire.com was not easy,” company president M. Scott Havens told Capital. Adweek Rebranding The Wire as a standalone site is consistent with the strategy that Atlantic Media took with recent launches Quartz and Defense One, and The Atlantic Cities channel may eventually follow suit. “The Atlantic incubated these brands, but once they create a dedicated and consistent audience and marketers start to reconcile them [outside of The Atlantic], I think there is some benefit to having a standalone brand,” Havens said.

Chief Operating Officer Stuart Karle Is Leaving Reuters (NY Observer)
Stuart Karle, Reuters chief operating officer, is leaving the company and his position will be eliminated, Reuters CEO Andrew Rashbass announced in a staff email Monday morning. FishbowlNY Karle came to Reuters in 2011. He previously worked as general counsel for The Wall Street Journal, a role he held for 16 years. TheWrap The move comes after the company announced last month that it will cut 5 percent of its editorial operations.

MSNBC’s Martin Bashir Apologizes to Sarah Palin Over ‘Offensive’ Slavery Remarks (TheWrap)
MSNBC host Martin Bashir apologized during his show Monday for remarks he made on-air suggesting former Alaska governor Sarah Palin deserved to have someone “sh*t” in her mouth. “I wanted to take this opportunity to say sorry to Mrs. Palin and to also offer an ‘unreserved apology’ to her friends and family, her supporters, our viewers and anyone who may have heard what I said,” he said. Bashir made the inappropriate comments Friday in response to Palin’s remarks that U.S. debt to China would result in a “slavery” situation. The Washington Post / Erik Wemple As full-voiced apologies go, Bashir’s belongs in the same league with that of Ed Schultz, who in 2011 apologized on MSNBC’s air for having called Laura Ingraham a “right-wing slut” on his radio show. The vile suggestion that Palin be treated like a slave is tough to tease out from the pressures of cable TV. Given how much blather fills the airwaves these days, it’s hard to get noticed with the same old Bashir segments decrying Republicans and cheering for the Obama administration and progressive causes. One way to stick out is to step over the line. NY Mag / Daily Intelligencer MSNBC anchors, it seems, are getting quite vulgar.

Hollywood Studios Facing Upheaval at Highest Levels (NYT)
Advice for the power players at Hollywood’s coming round of black-tie galas: Don’t leave your seat to table-hop. Your chair might be gone when you get back. Even as the movie awards season accelerates here, studio chiefs and major producers have been fretting less about Oscars than about job security. A rolling realignment has knocked out top executives, broken apart old alliances and shattered assumptions about corporate loyalties and the industry’s pecking order.

Salon Media Group Revenues Continue to Rise (Folio:)
Salon Media Group recorded another boost in net revenues for its fiscal 2014 first half, which ended Sept. 30. The top line increased 63 percent to $2.8 million versus the same period last year. Accordingly, the company’s losses narrowed to $1.2 million for the period, a 52 percent decrease when compared to its fiscal first-half in 2013. The revenue increase is attributed to a corresponding growth in unique visitors, but the company also reports a significant jump in mobile traffic as well.

OJR: An Old Web Icon Ends Up Repurposed as A Spamblog (Nieman Journalism Lab)
This is a cautionary tale — about what happened to what was once one of the most important websites about journalism on the Internet, and about what happens when you don’t renew your domains on time. If you’ve been in the digital news business for a while, it’s likely you have fond memories of OJR, the Online Journalism Review, based at the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School.

Digital First Will Add Paywalls at Most of Its Daily Newspapers (Poynter / MediaWire)
Digital First Media plans to expand its paywall offerings to most of its 75 daily newspapers, CEO John Paton says in a blog post. The paywalls will be an all-access model. Paton, a noted skeptic about paywalls in the past, writes that while “digital advertising has grown more than 89 percent,” the company needs “more gas in the tank if we are going to complete this journey of print-to-digital transformation.”

Forbes Is Latest Old Media for Sale, With Help From New York Times (The Guardian / Michael Wolff)
A week ago, Christine Haughney, who covers media for The New York Times, wrote a puff piece about Forbes magazine and its CEO Mike Perlis. The piece said that Perlis had saved Forbes, the almost 100-year-old business magazine, through the adroit ways he had adapted the print product to the digital age, including his aggressive push into “native advertising” — in Haughney’s casual explanation, “using journalistic content for marketing purposes.”

Al Jazeera America’s Ratings Can Be Seen in A Million Different Ways (HuffPost)
A New York Post article on Al Jazeera America’s seemingly anemic ratings got a lot of people in media-land talking on Monday — and prompted a conversation about how, exactly, we should look at a network’s viewing figures. By some measures, Al Jazeera America is doing far worse than its predecessor. By other measures, it’s holding relatively steady.

What It’s Like to Start A Digital Mag on Global Women’s Issues (10,000 Words)
Magazines are going through quite a transition these days. While print newspapers are in a downward spiral, digital magazines are thriving. And that’s exactly why now is an opportune moment to create a digital pub. At least that’s what Daria Solovieva and Ivy Ng are hoping. The Columbia Journalism School grads recently created Valerie, a “space to feature female writers, bloggers, photographers, bring you stories of inspiring women and feature economic, social and political issues impacting lives of women across the globe.”

Tina Brown Says She’s as ‘Voracious A Reader’ of Print as Ever (Capital New York)
After accepting a lifetime achievement award from the Newswomen’s Club of New York at the Down Town Association on Thursday night, Tina Brown set the record straight: She still reads print magazines.

Bullying of Staff in Newspapers Is A Way of Life, With A Long History (The Guardian / Greenslade Blog)
Bullying is common within the media, arts and entertainment industries despite the patina of glamour that attaches to them. A survey of 4,000 workers, released at a conference in London Tuesday, found that 56 percent of those questioned said they had been bullied, harassed or suffered discrimination at work. One stand-out feature was the “exceptionally high” bullying in newspapers at both national and local level.

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