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Morning Media Newsfeed: Globe & Mail Gets It Wrong | Obama Blogs at HuffPost | 60 Minutes & Benghazi

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Globe And Mail Erroneously Claims Ex-NSA Chief Michael Hayden Killed at LAX (TheWrap)
In yet another in a long list of major breaking news errors committed by major news outlets, Canada’s Globe and Mail falsely reported that ex-NSA chief Michael Hayden was killed in Friday’s shooting at Los Angeles International Airport. In a report attributed to “Reuters and Associated Press,” Globe and Mail wrote “LAPD is reporting Ex-NSA chief Michael Hayden has been shot dead at LAX. Radical Christian group has claimed responsibility on its website.” Gawker Canada’s Sun News Network and the BBC both repeated the hoax report without a source, and all have since scrubbed the claim from their sites. The Globe and Mail eventually retracted the report and replaced it with the line “Reports that a former NSA chief was among the victims appear to be a hoax.” It appears the hoax first surfaced on a fake breaking news Twitter account with a single tweet. Poynter John Stackhouse, the Globe and Mail’s editor-in-chief, tells Poynter via phone that the “embarrassing” mistake was an occasion to reiterate the newsroom’s policies for verifying breaking news. “It was an unfortunate human error made by people not following the practices and procedures we have in place,” he said. FishbowlNY The offending Twitter account has now been deleted. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Getting it wrong seems to have become the industry standard. There are apologies, corrections (though not always), and then the next time a gun goes off or a ruling gets made we see the same old mistakes.

Barack Obama Blogs About Discrimination for Huffington Post (The Atlantic Wire)
Barack Obama: President of the United States, Huffington Post blogger. In a post on Sunday night, Obama made the case for Congress to finally pass ENDA, otherwise known as the Employment Non-Discrimination Act. The measure would protect gay and transgender employees from discrimination on the basis of their orientation or gender identity, and it goes up for a vote in the Senate Monday night. Speaking of that lack of protection for LGBT Americans, the president wrote: “It’s offensive. It’s wrong. And it needs to stop, because in the United States of America, who you are and who you love should never be a fireable offense.” NY Mag / Daily Intelligencer Obama publishes traditional op-eds in daily newspapers with some regularity — on U.S. relations with Latin America in the Miami Herald, on the threat of cyber attacks in The Wall Street Journal, on Title IX for Newsweek — but he’s also the first president to do a Reddit AMA. That appearance put him in unfiltered contact with the site’s many denizens for several hours. Naturally, the HuffPost item is a lot more polished than his Reddit answers, and there’s not a lot in Obama’s piece that could be considered controversial. But the very act of contributing to a site well known for not paying its writers comes at an awkward time, following Tim Kreider’s recent opinion piece about “slaves of the Internet” being asked to write for free.

A Call for 60 Minutes to Retract Report on Benghazi Attack (TVNewser)
CNN’s Reliable Sources discussed the credibility of the Oct. 27 60 Minutes report about the 9/11/12 attacks in Benghazi. Lara Logan‘s report relied on the eyewitness account of Dylan Davies, a British security contractor at the time, who went by the name Morgan Jones for the CBS report, and as the author of a book on the subject. An official incident report differs from the version of events Davies’ writes about in his book, and conveyed to Logan. It also differs from the accounts that Davies gave to the FBI and various other U.S. agencies. 60 Minutes, caught between Davies’ account and what the government says really happened, has not responded. Media Matters has already called on CBS News to retract the report. Daily Beast / Washington Bureau In an interview Saturday with The Daily Beast, Davies said he did not write the incident report, nor had he ever seen it. “I am just a little man against some big people here,” Davies said. “They can do things, make up things, anything they want, I wouldn’t stand a chance.” Davies said he did not know who leaked the report to The Washington Post but said he suspected it was the State Department, an allegation that could not be independently corroborated. Foreign Policy / The Cable It’s certainly possible that Jones’ account on 60 Minutes is the accurate portrayal of his activities the night of the attack as opposed to the account given to his employer. However, if that’s not the case, there certainly will be a number of journalists, Hollywood executives, publishers and politicians with egg on their faces.

GateHouse’s Times Herald-Record Lays Off All Four Staff Photographers (JimRomenesko.com)
In early September, News Corp. sold its Dow Jones Local Media Group — 33 newspapers — to the majority shareholder of GateHouse Media. I received reports Friday of “bloodbaths” at some of the former Dow Jones papers. The Middletown (NY) Times Herald-Record has confirmed my tipsters’ reports that the paper has laid off its four staff photographers and will now rely on freelancers.

Toronto Star Praised for Investigative Scoop About City’s Mayor (The Guardian / Greenslade Blog)
“Bravo, Toronto Star. We’re very much in your debt.” That handsome tribute comes from John Gordon Miller, on his journalism doctor blog, because of the paper’s dogged investigative journalism in exposing the bizarre behavior of Toronto’s mayor, Rob Ford. Miller is full of praise for the Star‘s work as “a courageous watchdog in the public’s interest.” He writes: “Seldom in recent memory has a newspaper ‘owned’ a story as thoroughly as the Star owns the Rob Ford exposé.”

Barbara Walters: Jenny McCarthy Criticism ‘Was Unfair’ (HuffPost)
Barbara Walters is speaking out against the negative reports about new View host Jenny McCarthy. The show denied reports that viewers were turned off by McCarthy, who joined the cast in September. “There is absolutely no truth to this story,” a spokesperson for The View told the New York Daily News. Walters further defended McCarthy in an interview with Howard Kurtz on his Fox News show MediaBuzz. “I think the criticism about her was unfair and it was criticism that had to do with very personal views,” she told Kurtz, referring to McCarthy’s controversial autism activism. TVNewser Walters and Kurtz discussed her upcoming retirement, what she wants her legacy to be and McCarthy‘s role on The View. They also discussed the current state of 20/20, the show Walters anchored until 2004.

Two French Journalists Abducted, Killed in Northern Mali (Reuters)
Two French radio journalists were killed by gunmen in northern Mali on Saturday shortly after being abducted in the town of Kidal, French and Malian officials said. The French government confirmed that 58-year old Claude Verlon and Ghislaine Dupont, 51, both journalists at RFI radio, had been found dead.

Roland Martin on News One Now, CNN Frustrations And News Diversity (TheWrap)
When News One Now premieres on TV One on Monday, it will be the first morning show any black network has launched and the first daily show in TV One’s nine-year history. “This is probably one of the most important things I’ve done in my career,” anchor Roland Martin told TheWrap. The show, a simulcast of the third hour of Martin’s Radio One show, will provide coverage of news and current events from a black perspective, something that Martin said has been lacking in mainstream media broadcasts.

U.S. Journalism Makes Break With Market Forces (The Guardian / Media Blog)
Something shocking has happened to U.S. journalism: It has parted company with the free market. Perhaps the divorce is irrevocable, although a state of denial still exists. This has been a gradual process but the events of the past few months make the rift visible, though still largely unacknowledged.

Yahoo!’s Mayer on The Talent Hunt for Tech Journalists (AllThingsD)
Over the weekend, a Yahoo! recruiter tried to poach two of our fine AllThingsD reporters for what was described as a “new initiative within our Tech Vertical.” According to the recruiter, who used LinkedIn for the outreach, the effort had the “backing of [Yahoo! CEO] Marissa Mayer, as well as many of our executives, and will be the first of many of these types of editorial models that we expect to roll out globally within the next year.”

For Modern Farmer, Farm Stands Hold More Promise Than Newsstands (Poynter)
When Modern Farmer launched its GoatCam in September, editor-in-chief Ann Marie Gardner was surprised to hear from people working at the Pentagon. “They had a suggestion for changing the angle of the camera so they could see the goats better,” Gardner said in a phone interview. Modern Farmer is proving adept at finding audiences in places one wouldn’t expect.

Student Newspapers Scurry to Make Ends Meet (NYT)
Within a month of taking over as editor of The Hatchet, George Washington University’s student newspaper, Cory Weinberg knew that something had to change. Advertising dollars had been steadily declining. Printing costs continued to rise. At the same time, visits to the website were up. The number of students reading articles on their mobile devices had doubled. Traffic from Twitter had increased 300 percent in the last year.

Google’s Eric Schmidt Lambasts NSA Over Spying (WSJ)
Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt slammed reports that the U.S. government allegedly spied on the company’s data centers, describing such an act as “outrageous” and potentially illegal if proven. “It’s really outrageous that the National Security Agency was looking between the Google data centers, if that’s true. The steps that the organization was willing to do without good judgment to pursue its mission and potentially violate people’s privacy, it’s not OK,” Schmidt told The Wall Street Journal in an interview.

It’s The Golden Age of News (NYT / Bill Keller)
Over the past 20 years, to loud laments from media veterans, American news organizations have retreated from the costly business of foreign coverage — closing bureaus, slashing space and airtime. Yet for the curious reader with a sense of direction, this is a time of unprecedented bounty.

What to Do With $250 Million in Digital Journalism? (Monday Note)
Pierre Omidyar, eBay’s founder and now philanthropist, pledged $250 million to a new investigative reporting venture. Starting a project of this magnitude from scratch isn’t an everyday occurrence, leading us to wonder how it could look.

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