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Maria Russo Rejoins the New York Times

RussoHeadshotAfter a long run in Los Angeles, veteran journalist and editor Maria Russo is headed back to New York City. Starting August 4, she will be the children’s book editor for the New York Times Book Review.

Here’s the memo from TBR editor Pamela Paul and deputy editor David Kelly:

Maria is a veteran of TBR, having filled in as a preview editor under Chip McGrath, and a native New Yorker. She was first brought in as a freelance book reviewer by Dwight Garner, whom Maria succeeded as books editor at Salon. Maria is also a former features editor at the New York Observer.

Despite all her New York cred, for the past 10 years, Maria has been working in Los Angeles, where she was most recently the editor in chief of Pasadena magazine. Before that, she was an editor in the Calendar section of the Los Angeles Times. Maria has also published widely as a freelancer, writing for the Magazine and the Book Review, among other venues.

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Commas are a Powerful Thing

Hmmm. Perhaps a better way to say this would be “BREAKING: Dutch military plane, carrying bodies from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash, lands in Eindhoven.”

Marie Claire’s ‘Denim Issue’ Shows There’s Hope for Magazines

Fear not, magazine lovers of America. There is hope for the printed word after all, and it comes in the form of Marie Claire’s Denim Issue.

As Ad Age notes, the cover is designed to be “unzipped” down the middle. It’s gimmicky, yes, but you know who loves gimmicks? Advertisers!

Guess jeans — which bought the space and has its logo all over the inside of the cover — paid six figures for the ad. If a company is dumb enough to pay that much for an ad that requires consumers to destroy it, then the magazine industry is going to be fine.

[Video via Ad Age]

WSJ’s Computer Systems Hacked

WSJ-twitter-logoSeveral computer systems that contain The Wall Street Journal’s news graphics have been hacked. The Journal reports that no damage had been done to the graphics systems and customer data remained safe.

“We are investigating an incident related to wsj.com’s graphics systems,” explained a Journal spokesperson. “At this point we see no evidence of any impact to Dow Jones customers or customer data.”

The Journal’s announcement comes in response to a hacker, who claimed he had tapped into wsj.com and would sell both user information and the code to manipulate the site. The vulnerability that allowed the hacker inside was located within the news graphics systems.

The Journal and a cybersecurity firm are monitoring the hacker and the site, but we’d say this is a good time to go ahead and change your wsj.com password.

FishbowlNY Newsstand: Your Morning at a Glance

Morning Media Newsfeed: Murray Named Fortune Editor | Gunshots Fired at AJ Bureau

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Alan Murray Named Editor of Fortune (FishbowlNY)
Alan Murray has been named the new editor of Fortune. He will be just the 17th editor of the glossy, which was founded in 1930 by the legendary Henry Luce. TVNewser Murray joins the Time Inc. publication following a short stint as president of the Pew Research Center. Murray was CNBC’s Washington bureau chief from 2002 to 2005, where he co-hosted Capital Report With Alan Murray And Gloria Borger. Borger is now with CNN. FishbowlDC Murray joined Pew as president in November 2012. In addition to WSJ bureau chief, he served as deputy managing editor and executive editor of online for the Wall Street Journal. Capital New York Murray replaces longtime Fortune editor Andy Serwer, who is leaving Time Inc. after 29 years. Serwer spent eight years running Fortune, which is one of the company’s most prominent brands along with Time, Sports Illustrated, People and Entertainment Weekly. HuffPost Murray will remain at Pew until Aug. 1. He said that Jim McMillan, general counsel and corporate secretary at the Pew Charitable Trusts, will then take over as “acting president” while the company searches for a new leader.

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First Rule | Dangerous Times | New Chief

GalleyCat: The sequel to Fight Club will be in the form of a comic book. But of course, we can’t talk about it.

TVNewser: Shots were fired at Al Jazeera’s Gaza bureau.

FishbowlDC: In better bureau news, The Financial Times has a new Washington bureau chief.

AFAR Media’s Trajectory: Self-Funded, Bi-Coastal, Profitable

In 2009, AFAR Media was launched with a focus on travel and a combined $20 million investment from Joe Diaz, Greg Sullivan and Ernie Garcia. This summer, at the five-year anniversary mark and with the August/September issue having just hit newsstands, AFAR has arrived at profitability.

Branded content currently accounts for a third of AFAR’s revenues. In the latest print issue, starting on page 19, there is for example “Artisans Inspired.” Part of a year-long partnership with The Ritz-Carlton, the three-page feature is anchored around quotes from surfer Loni Klein, New York Botanical Gardens curator Karen Daubmann and international travel excursions leader Sean Nelson.

AFARMediaRitzCarletonContent

“This is a multi-dimensional, multi-platform branded content program that lives in print, mobile and on desktop,” says Diaz during a recent telephone conversation with FishbowlNY. “How we try to approach branded content is – it’s really all about what is the core idea. What are the hooks, what are the elements that are going to get people excited.”

“We don’t care if it’s paid [content] or if it’s editorial,” he adds. “Our philosophy is that the content always has to be good. And we’re not shy about making sure everybody knows that this is paid for. The whole idea of the campaign is that artisans inspire and let’s help bring those rich values and characters to life, through the eyes of the people on the ground.”

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Brain, Child, the Literary Mag for Mothers, Adds Poetry, Expanded Reviews Section

Brain, Child: The Magazine for Thinking Mothers launched in 2000 and has been lauded for its award-winning content. When editor-in-chief Marcelle Soviero took the helm in 2012, she said one of her goals was to keep the “major tenants of the magazine” in place. That is, she would continue to publish short stories, essays and features that offered a “cerebral experience” for its readers.

There have also been some recent changes that are providing new opportunities for freelancers, such as a forthcoming poetry section, for which Soviero is eager to find freelancers and established poets. In addition, a broader reviews section means writers should send pitches on books with a motherly, literary angle. Just make sure you have an understanding of the magazine. Soviero said:

Brain, Child doesn’t publish the typical how-tos and product reviews found in many service-oriented parenting magazines and websites. Pitches should have a literary quality. Perspectives should be parent-focused rather than child-centric.

For more on what the editors want, read: How to Pitch: Brain Child: The Magazine for Thinking Mothers.

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Kentucky Resident Responds to NYT ‘Persistent Poverty’ Coverage

NYTHelpMeKYDuring the last weekend of June, the New York Times Magazine asked: “What’s the Matter With Eastern Kentucky?” Today, via an op-ed in The Floyd County Times, Jonathan Gay answers with the equivalent of: “Less than you think.”

Gay is the director of the Kentucky Innovation Network office in Morehead, where he works with local entrepreneurs. He
argues that the piece by Annie Lowrey was a classic case of big-city myopia and explains how he, pro-actively, is moving forward:

Rather than wait on the New York Times to tell that [hopeful] story, we’ve decided to start telling it ourselves. Through words, photos, tweets, social media and video, we will soon be launching a Web effort to tell the tales of entrepreneurs living in eastern Kentucky. We’ll begin with one each from the six eastern Kentucky counties the Times reported as being in the bottom 10.

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