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Anna Wintour Musical Returning to Joe’s Pub

BeeShafferRyanRafteryOne-man show Ryan Raftery is the Most Powerful Woman in Fashion is way over the top. Raftery’s drag-version of Anna Wintour gets “chronic constipation” as a result of running that Kimye cover and fearing that she will be fired from Condé Nast by S.I. Newhouse.

After debuting earlier this month at Joe’s Pub, the show is scheduled for a pair of encore Friday late-night shows in early September. As Raftery recently told The Cut‘s Maggie Lange, it all started with a chance encounter:

Raftery has done a solo show a year since 2009 — and the five before this one were all about his personal life. He says that he ran out of material, and instead of “waiting to be kidnapped,” he decided to find some other subject matter.

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NY Post: Women Should ‘Deal With’ Catcalls

NY Post Logo 10-14The New York Post isn’t satire, is it? Just wanted to be sure, because a piece titled “Hey Ladies — Catcalls are Flattering, Deal With It” was just published, and it’s so awful it must be a joke.

Doree Lewak, a features writer for the Post, simply loves to be sexually harassed by men. She cannot get enough. “When I know I’m looking good, I brazenly walk past a construction site, anticipating that whistle and ‘Hey, mama!’ catcall,” writes Lewak. “Works every time — my ego and I can’t fit through the door!” Uh…

Lewak goes on to explain that being belittled by strangers makes her a feminist:

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More of The Same in Ferguson

Another day of protests in Ferguson, Missouri; another day of reporters getting harassed, threatened and arrested by police.

Last night, Getty Images photographer Scott Olson and The Intercept’s Ryan Devereaux were both arrested while covering the tense situation. Olson has been released and Devereaux is expected to be freed this morning — with no charges, of course.

Those reporters lucky enough to avoid being arrested dealt with what has become typical threats and harassment from law enforcement. Vice’s Tim Pool had his press badge ripped off of him by a cop who yelled “This doesn’t mean shit!” CNN’s Don Lemon and Jake Tapper had to run from a tear gas canister used by police to disperse a crowd.

At this point you can probably just treat this post as a Mad Libs for reporting on Ferguson. The names and the details will slightly change, but the story will — unfortunately — remain the same.

[Image: Ryan Devereaux / Twitter]

FishbowlNY Newsstand: Your Morning at a Glance

Morning Media Newsfeed: Journalists Under Threat in MO | Broadcasters Aim at Aereo

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Ferguson Police Threaten Journalists (FishbowlNY)
Police in Ferguson, Missouri, have once again clashed with reporters covering the aftermath of the Michael Brown shooting. One cop, who was being filmed by local radio journalist Mustafa Hussein, threatened to shoot if Hussein didn’t stop. MSNBC’s Chris Hayes was also threatened by an officer who said “Get back! Or next time you’re gonna be the one maced.” Three other journalists – Sports Illustrated’s Robert Klemko, The Telegraph’s Rob Crilly and The Financial Times’ Neil Munshi — tweeted that they had been briefly arrested and then released. TVNewser Three more reporters were arrested in Ferguson overnight Sunday, with several more reporting being detained or threatened. FishbowlDC Last Wednesday, The Washington Post’s Wesley Lowery and HuffPost’s Ryan Reilly were arrested inside a McDonald’s and later released. The same night, tear gas was shot at an Al Jazeera America crew in Ferguson. TVNewser As the National Guard arrived in Ferguson, where the overnight curfew has been lifted, the broadcast and cable networks had set plans to continue coverage of the escalating violence there Monday. Brian Williams anchored Nightly News from Ferguson Monday night, and correspondents Ron Allen and Mark Potter reported from Ferguson. ABC News had Steve Osunsami and Alex Perez, CBS News sent Mark Strassmann and Vladimir Duthiers, and MSNBC deployed Hayes and MSNBC.com reporters Trymaine Lee and Amanda Sakuma. CNN’s Anderson Cooper, Don Lemon and Jake Tapper were also in Ferguson, as well as Fox News’ Mike Tobin and Shepard Smith. PRNewser In the wake of the violence, the town of Ferguson has hired a PR firm, Common Ground Public Relations, for communications help. According to a rep from Common Ground, the firm is only handling the deluge of media requests that the city has been getting since protests began about a week ago.

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RIP: Don Pardo

For the New York Times obituary of Saturday Night Live announcer Don Pardo, who passed away Monday at age 96, Neil Genzlinger and Bill Carter do a good job of sourcing key portions of a 2006 interview Pardo recorded for the Archive of American Television. Here for example, via that conversation, is how Pardo says he came up with his slowed down and heavily enunciated signature announcing style:

Mr. Pardo said the way The Price is Right was shot led him to develop his peculiar elongated delivery. “The cameras are moving so slowly, and that’s the way I had to describe it: slowly,” he said of the merchandise on the show, which he would describe before contestants tried to guess its price. “Those cameras were large then. You want to make sure you describe what the camera is on.”

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Sticky Notes | Awful TV | Unfunny Business

facebookwiredAllFacebook: Moms and teens across the nation rejoice — Facebook might soon allow users to post stickers in comments.

TVNewser: Not only did Good Morning America interrupt an interview with Michael Brown’s mom by playing unrelated video footage, the clip that played was of a Target store. That’s bad on so many levels we lost track.

FishbowlDC: Hillary Clinton might make a good president one day, but don’t ever count on her for laughs.

A Leap of Columbia University Logic

Normally, we wouldn’t highlight a blog post that ends with this type of disclaimer:

TheBlaze contributor channel supports an open discourse on a range of views. The opinions expressed in this channel are solely those of each individual author.

However, Wayne Root‘s latest channel contribution –  ”Do We Have a Sociopath in the White House?” – is simply too nutty to ignore.

WayneRootAuthorTag

Early on, the author sets up his argument with the notion that a sociopath’s tendencies are firmly established by the time that person has graduated from high school:

By college, a person’s personality, attitude and behavior is fairly well set. That’s why Obama’s Columbia days tell us so much about his behavior as President today.

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Gawker Shares Egregious Time Inc. Spreadsheet [Updated]

SICrowdSourceCoverWow. Via the Newspaper Guild, Gawker’s Hamilton Nolan has obtained an internal Time Inc. spreadsheet that was used to help decide which Sports Illustrated writers to lay off.

It is column “J” that is already reverberating across social media. The column is titled: ‘Produces content that [is] beneficial to advertisers:’

Anthony Napoli, a union representative with the Newspaper Guild, tells us: “Time Inc. actually laid off Sports Illustrated writers based on the criteria listed on that chart. Writers who may have high assessments for their writing ability, which is their job, were in fact terminated based on the fact the company believed their stories did not ‘produce content that is beneficial to advertiser relationships.’”

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All the Competition News That’s Fit to Recall

newyorktimes-logoThe answer to this great trivia question is: D.M. Redfield. He’s the New Haven, Connecticut reader whose proposed new motto for the New York Times was declared the winner back in 1896.

Wisely, in the end, the NYT decided to stick with “All the news that’s fit to print.” From Adrienne LaFrance‘s item for The Altantic about the paper’s $100 tagline-our-paper competition:

The Times wrote that it had received entries from nearly every state in the union — there were 45 of them in 1896 — and signaled out entries from women. Many contestants “wholly ignored the request for a motto or phrase of only ten words of less,” the Times wrote. Some of the other ideas that readers sent:

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