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Posts Tagged ‘Alan Murray’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Murray Named Fortune Editor | Gunshots Fired at AJ Bureau

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Alan Murray Named Editor of Fortune (FishbowlNY)
Alan Murray has been named the new editor of Fortune. He will be just the 17th editor of the glossy, which was founded in 1930 by the legendary Henry Luce. TVNewser Murray joins the Time Inc. publication following a short stint as president of the Pew Research Center. Murray was CNBC’s Washington bureau chief from 2002 to 2005, where he co-hosted Capital Report With Alan Murray And Gloria Borger. Borger is now with CNN. FishbowlDC Murray joined Pew as president in November 2012. In addition to WSJ bureau chief, he served as deputy managing editor and executive editor of online for the Wall Street Journal. Capital New York Murray replaces longtime Fortune editor Andy Serwer, who is leaving Time Inc. after 29 years. Serwer spent eight years running Fortune, which is one of the company’s most prominent brands along with Time, Sports Illustrated, People and Entertainment Weekly. HuffPost Murray will remain at Pew until Aug. 1. He said that Jim McMillan, general counsel and corporate secretary at the Pew Charitable Trusts, will then take over as “acting president” while the company searches for a new leader.

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Alan Murray Named Editor of Fortune [Updated]

Alan Murray has been named the new editor of Fortune. He will be just the 17th editor of the glossy, which was founded in 1930 by the legendary Henry Luce. Murray most recently served as president of the Pew Research Center. He had been with Pew since 2012.

Prior to joining Pew, Murray worked at the Wall Street Journal in a variety of roles, most recently deputy managing editor and online executive editor. During Murray’s 10-year stint as the Journal’s Washington bureau chief, the bureau won three Pulitzers.

“Alan’s diverse background uniquely positions him to lead Fortune,” said Time Inc.’s executive VP, Todd Larsen, in a statement. “He is a digital champion and media visionary who can bridge every aspect of our business, moving effortlessly from the newsroom to the boardroom to television to conference stage.”

Murray will succeed Andy Serwer, who is leaving Time Inc. after 30 years.

Update (12:00 pm):
Below is Murray’s note to Pew staffers, announcing his decision to leave.

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Where Does the New York Post Go from Here?

Col Allan told The Capital media reporter Joe Pompeo that he shall return, once newspaper turnaround work is completed Down Under. But many of those at the New York Post who spoke to the journalist aren’t so sure.

Watching over the editorial fortunes of the paper in Allan’s absence is Jesse Angelo, formerly of The Daily. Pompeo writes about a NYP retreat last fall up in the Hudson Highlands during which the since departed EIC made a scary confession:

At the beginning of the event, Allan offered a rare mea culpa from his perch at the back of the room.

“As most of you know, there was nobody less interested in the Internet at this newspaper than me,” one person who was there recalls him saying. “It seems I was wrong about that.”

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Alan Murray Leaves WSJ for Pew Research Center

Alan Murray is leaving the Wall Street Journal, where he has been since 1983, to become president of the Pew Research Center. Murray  came to the Journal as a reporter covering economic policy, and worked his way up from there.

Murray most recently served as the paper’s online deputy managing editor and executive editor. Raju Narisetti will succeed him.

“Digital is a land of many metrics, and the metrics during Alan’s reign have been extraordinary,” said Robert Thomson, Dow Jones’ editor-in-chief and the Journal’s managing editor, in a memo. “Our audience has expanded fourfold during the past five years and almost 65 million people visit our sites each month. Each of those individuals owes Alan a small word of thanks, but no words can capture the gratitude I have for his enduring contribution to the Journal and to journalism.”

The full memo from Thomson is below.

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Rumors Circulate About New WSJ EIC

When News Corp. splits its companies into two segments — entertainment and publishing — it is expected that current Wall Street Journal editor-in-chief Robert Thomson will head up the latter. With Thompson moving on, the Journal’s newsroom, according to The Huffington Post, is “buzzing” about who will replace him.

Here are all the people being considered for the top spot; or to replace the deputy editor-in-chief, Gerald Baker, should he get the nod:

  • Gerard Baker. He is naturally the lead candidate, but some at the Journal aren’t too happy about that. In fact, in 2011, one staffer said it would be “Horrifying” if Baker got the job. That might be a tad dramatic, but hey, nothing fuels a rumor like an overreaction.
  • Alan Murray. The deputy managing editor, executive editor of online is close behind Baker for grabbing Thomson’s role.
  • Michael Miller. Another deputy managing editor.
  • Matt Murray. International and investing editor.
  • Almar Latour. Editor-in-chief of the Journal’s Asia edition.

WSJ Launches Streaming Mobile Video Site

The Wall Street Journal has launched a mobile news video site called WorldStream. The site features video footage that is shot on smartphones by reporters from all of the Dow Jones’ brands. WorldStream is overseen by WSJ editorial video director Shawn Bender and real-time video deputy Mark Scheffler.

Each video is posted within minutes after a reporter submits it to an editor, making the site an almost live feed for news.

“Our video viewership has more than doubled in the past six months to over 20 million streams, and the creation of this video blog is a milestone in the expansion of video at the Journal,” said Alan Murray, deputy managing editor and executive editor of WSJ.com.

The Wall Street Journal Launches Interactive Video Application

The Wall Street Journal has launched a new interactive video application for the iPad, Internet-ready TVs and set-top boxes. Titled “WSJ Live,” the app brings up to four hours of live TV from the Journal to the aforementioned products each business day. The available content includes breaking news, exclusive interviews and seven half-hour shows.

“WSJ Live brings our existing — and growing — stable of video programming to an unprecedented level of distribution and exposure,” explained Alan Murray, Deputy Managing Editor and Executive Editor, Online, for the paper. “Because of the broad scope, we have more opportunities to showcase our journalism by bringing breaking news, analysis and insight closer to our current readers while simultaneously tapping into new audiences.”

The app is free, so you really don’t have much to lose. Eventually WSJ Live is going to add Hulu and Hulu Plus, so after watching stock tips, you can turn on the latest episode of “Glee.” Or vice versa if you can’t wait for your dose of teen karaoke.

WSJ’s Alan Murray: ‘We are suffering from guilt by association’

As the fallout from the phone hacking scandal continues, The Wall Street Journal has desperately tried to maintain its autonomy from News Corporation. Unfortunately, when editorials that read like a press release are published within its pages, it makes things a little difficult for everyone there to do that (even if they don’t like the editorial).

Alan Murray, the paper’s Deputy Managing Editor, and a few other Journal staffers spoke to WWD today and expressed their frustration with the situation. Murray defended the Journal, even adding that Rupert Murdoch has made it a better place:

We do feel we are suffering from guilt by association. My feeling, and that of many here, is that this is in many ways a better paper than it was four years ago, and Rupert Murdoch and Les Hinton both deserve great credit for investing in us and supporting and encouraging good journalism here.

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Wired Editor Chris Anderson Squares Off Against Macmillan CEO John Sargent on Free and Paid Content

paid content panel.jpg

Photo: (left to right) Chris Anderson, Gary Hoenig, John Sargent, Alan Murray

Last night’s discussion, Free AND Paid Content: Business Models That Work, hinged on whether consumers of news and books should and will pay for content online. But it became a tense intellectual slugging match between John Sargent, CEO of Macmillan Publishing, and moderator Chris Anderson, most recently the author of “Free: The Future of a Radical Price.”

“We have not grown up in an atmosphere of free books” — Sargent

Anderson contended that free digital copies could bring books back into the “cultural conversation,” while Sargent held steady as the consistent voice of dissent, expressing a grim forecast for the publishing industry and noting that it’s “hard to imagine books as a growth business.” Not even “freemiums” will work, Sargent said, warning of the “danger of the experimental stage,” in which giving away free books may increase sales the first year and even the second, only to see them disappear completely long-term. “It’s early,” he said. “We need a device or two and we definitely need a new screen.”

Anderson and Sargent were joined by panelists Gary Hoenig, ESPN Publishing’s general manager and editorial director, and Alan Murray, deputy managing editor and executive online editor of the Wall Street Journal, each of whom provided moderate voices amid Anderson’s proselytizing and Sargent’s foreboding.

Anderson moderated the panel hosted in the Condé Nast building where he works as editor-in-chief of Wired. As the group’s ostensible mediator, he served more as an antagonist to the three panelists, especially Sargent, highlighting the fact that all are generals in a war that seeks to have readers pay for a product that, in many cases, they can get for free.

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Wired‘s Anderson: “The Free Vs. Paid Debate Is Misunderstood”

anderson.jpgToday, we are staking out Wired magazine’s Disruptive By Design business conference. Wired editor-in-chief Chris Anderson (left) opened the day with a discussion about his upcoming book: “Free: The Future of a Radical Price,” and of course, he eventually started to talk about how the media has been affected by the rise of the Internet.

The Internet allows content to be published for little to no cost to the content provider, so the information can be provided for free. But what newspapers and magazines have failed to do so far is effectively monetize content provided online.

In his talk this morning, Anderson suggested that instead of looking at content as free versus paid, we should consider it as “freemium.” Following the model of The Wall Street Journal, newspapers can provide their exclusive stories and most popular content for free, while niche content can be placed behind a pay wall.

“People are more willing to pay for niche content because they realize how specialized it is,” Anderson said. Following this model, newspapers can hope to draw in readers who are not willing to pay for content and then convert some of them into paying consumers.

We caught up with Anderson to ask him if he saw his own magazine possibly taking on this model and what he sees as the future of newspapers and magazines.

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