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Posts Tagged ‘Arthur Sulzberger Jr’

Arthur Sulzberger Jr. and Mark Thompson Talk Advertising and Family Legacy at the Times

arthur sulzberger

Arthur Sulzberger Jr., chairman of the The New York Times, surveyed a restaurant full of media elites yesterday and declared that his family would never sell the Times. The Ochs-Sulzberger clan has owned the newspaper since 1896 and has a trust mechanism in place to ensure that the publication can’t be sold unless every single family member agrees, according to Sulzberger.

“The family is united around its ownership and its responsibility to maintaining The New York Times and its journalism and its journalistic integrity,” he told interviewer and former Times media reporter Alex S. Jones at the Bryant Park Grill.

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Thomas Middelhoff to Leave NY Times Board

Thomas Middelhoff GThomas Middelhoff, the former head of German media giant Bertelsmann, is stepping down from his spot on The New York Times Company’s board. Middelhoff has been on the Times’ board since 2003.

“Thomas has served with great distinction as an outstanding director of The New York Times Company for over a decade,” said Arthur Sulzberger Jr., chairman of the Times company and publisher of the Times, in a statement. “While I regret that he will not seek re-election, I am immensely grateful for his years of service, his advice and counsel, and his dedication in helping to steer the Times through a transformative period. We will all miss him.”

The Times said that all of its other directors — 13 in all — intend to seek re-election.

The Premiere Edition of The International New York Times

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Say hello to the International New York Times. The newish paper is edited in Paris, London, Hong Kong and New York. In a letter to readers, Arthur Sulzberger Jr wrote that the INYT will enable the Times to streamline production and therefore increase the editorial quality of the paper:

With today’s action, we are creating a single, unified global media brand, which will allow us to expand our digital hubs, grow our editorial team, add more international voices in news and opinion, and increase the coverage provided by some of our best writers from around the globe.

“It is our belief that The International New York Times will help you experience the world, while connecting and engaging with a global community of politically and culturally passionate people,” added Sulzberger.

Morning Media Newsfeed: NPR Disputes Report | Dead Celebs Sell Mags | NYT Chair Sells Stock


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NPR Dismisses an Ombudsman Report (CJR / Behind The News)
This past Friday, NPR ombudsman Edward Schumacher-Matos released an 80-page report reviewing an October 2011 Peabody-winning investigation into the South Dakota foster care system’s treatment of Native American children. The ombudsman’s review concluded that the investigation as aired violated NPR’s Code of Ethics. NPR management has vehemently disagreed with the ombudsman’s findings. In an “Editor’s Note” posted that same night as the report, chief content officer and executive vice president Kinsey Wilson and Margaret Low Smith, the senior vice president of news, stood by the substance of the reports. NPR The network stands by the thrust of NPR correspondent Laura Sullivan’s reporting. A number of media figures, such as former Wall Street Journal deputy managing editor William Grueskin, took to Twitter to comment that Schumacher-Matos’ approach was laudable and an unusual instance of rigor and transparency. Poynter / MediaWire Wilson and Smith write that they’ve “spent weeks with our team, re-examining the hundreds of interviews and documents that formed the basis of the series” and say “Overall, the process surrounding the ombudsman’s inquiry was unorthodox, the sourcing selective, the fact-gathering uneven and many of the conclusions, in our judgment, subjective or without foundation. For that reason, we’ve concluded there is little to be gained from a point-by-point response to his claims.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: AOL to Shed 300 Patch Sites | NYT Not for Sale | DCist Editor Fired


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AOL to Shut Down About 300 Patch.com Websites
(Newsday)
AOL plans to close, sell or find partners for nearly a third of its Patch.com local news sites, the company’s chief executive said Wednesday. Of the roughly 900 hyperlocal editions nationwide, nearly 300 are not successful and not likely to attract enough traffic or revenue, Tim Armstrong said in AOL’s second-quarter earnings call with analysts. Forbes / Mixed Media Armstrong suggested that AOL may be able to find willing partners for many of the sites in the numerous struggling metropolitan daily newspapers that have been unable to invest as much as they’d like in their own digital and local operations. Poynter / MediaWire Several Patch employees tell Poynter that on a phone call with site editors Wednesday afternoon, Armstrong said that there was zero probability that Patch would shut down, that the initiative enjoyed support on AOL’s board and that Patch is worth fighting for. FishbowlNY Just how much would a Patch site cost? Armstrong wouldn’t provide a specific number, but said it was “much, much lower” than $150,000, which is what they were estimated at in 2011. BuzzMachine / Jeff Jarvis I have a fourth option, Tim: Invest. Set up independent entrepreneurs — your employees, my entrepreneurial graduates, unemployed newspaper folks — to take over the sites. Offer them the benefit of continued network ad sales — that’s enlightened self-interest for Patch and AOL. Offer them training. Offer them technology. And even offer them some startup capital. Forbes AOL also announced it will buy video platform Adap.tv for $405 million, a reflection of the Internet company’s push to develop its online-advertising business. The cash-and-stock deal will make Adap.tv, a video-ad platform that provides AOL access to the ad technology that the world’s largest companies use, an independent part of AOL’s video unit.

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NYT Staffers Walk Out: ‘We’re just looking for a fair contract’

This afternoon around 3:30, about 375 New York Times staffers walked out in an effort to protest management’s handling of contract negotiations. “We’re trying to save the essence of The New York Times,” said Metro columnist Michael Powell. Staffers wore stickers that read “Believe us.” and walked from the building’s 40th St. entrance, up Eighth Ave. to the entrance on 41st St. Read more

New York Times Company’s Profit Drops 24 Percent in 1Q

The New York Times Company announced its 2012 first quarter results today, and as has often been the case, there was mostly bad news. Despite net income skyrocketing to $42 million as a result of the company selling its Regional Newspapers, profit was down 24 percent in 1Q, compared to last year. Print and digital advertising revenue dropped as well, down seven and three percent, respectively. Additionally, revenue at About Group plummeted 23 percent.

“The uneven U.S. economic environment and uncertain global conditions continued to present challenges to the advertising marketplace,” said Arthur Sulzberger Jr., in a statement.

However, it wasn’t all bad news. Circulation revenue was up almost 10 percent and “Paid subscriptions to all of the company’s digital packages, e-readers and replica editions totaled approximately 472,000,” according to Sulzberger, Jr.

Fingers crossed that those numbers keep growing, not the ones we mentioned in the beginning.

New York Times Reporter’s Email Attacking Arthur Sulzberger Leaked

Here is something you should know: If you like having a job, don’t send an email to 150 of your co-workers that blasts the owner. Odds are, one — or even a few of them — won’t agree with you and that scathing letter will get leaked. Evidently, Donald McNeil, a science and health reporter for The New York Times, didn’t know that could happen.

According to Gawker, McNeil sent out an email to 150 Times staffers blasting the paper’s Publisher, Arthur Sulzberger Jr., and now it’s posted for all to see. In the note, McNeil states that Sulzberger is basically a lost cause:

So where is Arthur these days? At the small dinners he is having with staff, he offered an answer: He has found a new management guru, Michael Useem. And he is going trekking with Mr. Useem in the Himalayas soon…. A Nepal trek is very Arthur, since he’s a rock climber and Outward Bound tripper…. But to learn leadership? Shouldn’t a 60-year-old corporate chairman already know whether he’s a leader or not? Shouldn’t that have been decided by age 35 or so? And a trek now? In mid-crisis? We put out a great newspaper every day. But outside the newsroom, at the corporate level, we’re sailing on a ghost ship.

Here is something McNeil hopefully won’t ever have to find out: Being unemployed is fun at first, incredibly depressing after a week.

Janet Robinson Keeps Getting Richer

When the news broke that former New York Times CEO Janet Robinson was getting a severance package of $15 million, people were understandably upset. The Newspaper Guild even sent a letter — packed with 560 signatures — to Arthur Sulzberger Jr., protesting several items, including the amount and the timing of Robinson’s pension.

If people were pissed before, the rumor that Robinson is actually getting a $21 million severance package will likely lead to riots in the streets. Okay, it won’t be that bad, but there will definitely be some angry fist shaking.

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Newspaper Guild Sends Letter to Sulzberger Packed with 560 Signatures

On December 23, the Newspaper Guild of New York posted an open letter criticizing Arthur Sulzberger Jr. for freezing pensions  — while giving departed CEO Janet Robinson hers early — and for not budging in negotiations. That letter now has 560 signatures from New York Times staffers and others, along with scathing comments to Sulzberger.

“We are extremely grateful, excited and heartened by the overwhelming response to the letter,” said Bill O’Meara, the guild’s President, in a note sent around calling for any last minute signatures.

The letter was sent to Sulzberger last night. A sample of one of the quotes added to it:

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