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Posts Tagged ‘Barry Diller’

THR Lands Interview with Pat Kingsley

As the specter of Nikki Finke has been to entertainment journalism, so too once was the aura of Pat Kingsley to celebrity PR. And given Hollywood Reporter executive features editor Stephen Galloway‘s wily ways, we’re not at all surprised that it is he who landed Kingsley’s first official post-retirement interview.

THRPatKingsleyImageGalloway paid a visit to the 81-year-old Kingsley at her Pacific Palisades home the day before Thanksgiving. She remains too classy to spill the beans on former clients and any major contretemps (except for The TODAY Show and Jeff Zucker; what does that say about Zucker?). Rather, the joy of this feature comes largely from the small details about Kingsley’s current life and daily routine:

She gets up around 7:30 or 8 a.m., makes breakfast and does a little exercise. Then she switches on CNN (“I want the news, not opinions”), watches that and sports but relatively little entertainment…

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Norm Pearlstine Networks With Bonnie Fuller

LunchAtMichaelsWe’re going to file this week’s lunch in under ‘The more things change, the more they stay the same.’ Aside from a dining room full of the usual Wednesdays at Michael’s suspects, comprised of moguls (Barry Diller), media mavens (Bonnie Fuller, Connie Anne Phillips) and money men who keep the lights on all over town (Alan Patricof), I had an illuminating chat with Donald Albrecht, curator of architecture and design at the Museum of the City of New York and the editor/contributor of the new book, Gilded New York Design, Fashion and Society (The Monacelli Press). We were introduced by Dan Scheffey, who, in his past life, has handled public relations for Disney, Miramax and most recently toiled at Conde Nast. Dan is currently working on Monacelli’s fall book list and is gearing up to launch the Spring 2014 list with Ellen Rubin. When he mentioned Gilded New York to me some months ago, I immediately wanted to know more. Donald, an independent curator specializing in the decorative arts and architecture, joined us to talk about his work on both the exhibition and the book on New York’s Gilded Age of the late 19th century.

Dan Scheffey, Diane Clehane and Donald Albrecht

From left: Dan Scheffey, Diane Clehane and Donald Albrecht

By way of introduction to the period he explained, “The city’s old and new money used architecture, interior design, fashion and events — even lunch and dinners — as markers of status.” See where I’m going with this?  I thought you might.

Donald, who traded his career as an architect to focus on curating exhibitions and writing (“I found working solely in architecture really boring”), explained his love of curating exhibitions as a way of producing “visual culture.” His current exhibition (which shares the same name of the companion book) “Gilded New York” runs through the end of next year and features a stunning collection of objects that lend a window into the fascinating lives of the early swells of New York City whose great fortunes built the vast Fifth Avenue mansions during what was arguably city’s most glamorous era. Among the relics of this bygone age visitors to the museum can see: an ”Electric Light” dress by couturier Charles Frederick Worth dress once worn by Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt. The gown (which didn’t really light up) earned its name from the glittering crystals that illuminated the bodice (a newspaper at the time breathlessly reported it had been trimmed in diamonds), Tiffany & Co.’s Bon Bonniere, a miniature purse designed to hold bon bons or small pieces of candy to be discreetly carried so it could be enjoyed while dancing, and a swan-billed flask crafted from engraved glass and silver. The funny thing is I have no doubt any one of the artifacts would be right at home worn by Sarah Jessica Parker or carried by — dare we say it – Kanye West — at the Met Ball, no?

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Walter Isaacson, Barry Diller and Dylan Lauren Go Hollywood

LunchAtMichaelsIt was the usual head-spinning scene at Michael’s today as the decibel level rose to epic levels in every corner of the dining room throughout lunch. But all was tranquil (at least for the moment) when I arrived shortly before noon. There, I was greeted with the sight of two minions from Bonnie Fuller‘s office at Hollywoodlife.com who were arranging seating cards and ordering Pellegrino for Bonnie’s monthly schmoozefest. The power gals-in-training stayed just long enough to change into their high heels and shepherd the overflowing group of media mavens and social swans (and Dylan Lauren!) into the lounge for a round of air kissing before they finally settled into their perch in the bay window at Table One. Oh, to be young and ambitious.

I was joined today by two of my favorite Michael’s regulars who I met, of course, in the dining room many moons ago: producer and Democratic booster Joan Gelman and Robert Zimmerman, founder and partner of Zimmerman/Edelson Long Island’s leading public relations and marketing firm, who somehow also finds time to appear on CNN, Fox and MSNBC as a political commentator. On-air (and in conversation, of course) Robert offers well reasoned arguments against the extremists on both sides. “Too much attention focuses on being quotable, not credible. Too many commentators operate in a fact-free environment. Ann Coulter has become the Larry Flynt of political literature. Both live in a world of exploitation and filth,” said the Democratic National Committeeman (now in his 13th year in the position). Come on Robert, tell us how you really feel.

Robert Zimmerman Diane Clehane and Joan Gelman

Robert Zimmerman, Diane Clehane and Joan Gelman

I always look forward to our bi-annual Michael’s lunches because besides being two of the nicest – and funniest people in the room — Joan and Robert can always be counted on for some tasty dish on what’s really going on in any number of social, business and political circles in New York.

While some of the juiciest dish is off the record, we did cover a lot of ground on the current political scene. I had to ask Robert what he thought of the two biggest headaches plaguing the Obama administration that are getting plenty of media coverage. On the Obamacare website woes, Robert offered this: “If it were up to my Republican friends, we would have given up on NASA, Social Security and Medicare because each of them had difficult launches. Medicare took six years to establish after President Roosevelt it signed into law. The website will be fixed. The bigger issue will be if people are getting a better deal in terms of cost and coverage. That will determine the future of Obamacare and, to a large extent, Obama’s legacy.” Read more

Barry Diller, David Zaslav and the Exclusive on Star Jones’ TV Plans

LunchAtMichaelsIt was business as usual at Michael’s today, which means it was wall-to-wall moguls (Barry Diller, David Zaslav), EICs (Liz Vaccariello, Alison Brower) and TV newsers (Ron Insana, Felicia Taylor and Lynn Sherr) – and plenty of other famous faces. I was joined by Star Jones, one of my favorite regulars at 55th and Fifth, who I met when I was one of the first reporters to cover the freshman season of The View. Suffice to say there’s been plenty that’s happened in Star’s professional and personal life since then, and she’s come through it all wiser, funnier and more determined than ever to forge her own path. Sitting at Table 1 today, nibbling on her kale salad with a side of salmon, she practically glowed with happiness.

She was excited to tell me about her role as chief development officer and national spokesperson for the National Association of Professional Women, where she is serving as a passionate advocate for members on healthcare and equal pay, which, she said, has become a tent pole issue. With most of NAPW’s members in middle management and plenty of entrepreneurs in the ranks, Star is all about “stiletto networking,” as she told me, which involves developing programming for the membership that will help empower them to reach their goals. “This is an opportunity for me to use all my experience and not just be in one box as an attorney, talk show host or author. Women’s lives are comprised of so many difference facets; it’s exciting to act as a advocate for NAPW, as I’ve done with my work for the American Heart Association, for causes that I’m passionate about.” She has also created the NAPW Foundation which, in addition to AHA, supports the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Dress for Success and Girls Inc. Star also brings another valuable skill to NAPW:  finding the right benefits and services to offer to its members. “You know I’m good at getting perks for the sisters!”

Michael Cominotto, Diane Clehane, Star Jones and Katherine Butkevich

From left: Michael Cominotto, Diane Clehane, Star Jones and Katherine Butkevich

Ever since she forged her age on her driver’s license (upping it from 15 to 16) so she could get a job at McDonald’s (“The statute has run out on that crime!”), Star has been creating unforeseen opportunities for herself that have defied expectations. In the early 90s, she went from the Brooklyn DA’s office to the small screen when she was tapped as a commentator for Court TV and Inside Edition, covering high profile cases like William Kennedy Smith’s rape trial and The OJ Simpson case. By the time she left her seat at the table with Barbara Walters on her ABC chatfest, she was one of daytime television’s most famous faces. Of her run on The View: “They were the best eight years of my life,” she said before adding with some laughter, “But I was on for nine years and that last year was a little rough.” But, like they say, time heals all wounds, and Star reports her relationship with Walters is better than ever. Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Primetime Emmys Awarded | Daily Beast to Go On | Politico CEO Out


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Breaking Bad, Modern Family Are Top Shows at Emmys (USA Today)
As Breaking Bad continues its intense journey to its final moments, its cast and crew were all smiles at the Emmy Awards. With its series climax airing in a week, the AMC show won best drama series on Sunday night. “Man, I did not see this coming,” said creator Vince Gilligan, whom star Anna Gunn called a “mad genius” when accepting her outstanding supporting actress Emmy. CNET Netflix won its first Emmy award Sunday night, as David Fincher won for best directing of a drama series. The online subscription-video service, which has been touting itself of late as the “world’s leading Internet television provider,” was nominated for 14 primetime Emmy awards this year, the first time that an online-only service had shows in the running for one of television’s top creative honors. WSJ The Emmy win could boost Netflix’s prestige in Hollywood as an outlet for high-quality original series and further encourage writers, producers and actors to consider Netflix projects at a time when competition for talent among TV networks is as fierce as ever. Deadline Hollywood It was comedy ladies’ night at the Primetime Emmys as women swept both the comedy writing and directing categories for the first time in history. 30 Rock creator/executive producer Tina Fey and writer Tracey Wigfield won the writing Emmy for the series finale, while Gail Mancuso was recognized for the “Arrested” episode of ABC’s Modern Family. Mancuso is only the second woman ever to win the Emmy for comedy directing, following Betty Thomas, who won for Dream On 20 years ago. THR / The Live Feed Stephen Colbert dethroned former boss Jon Stewart at the 2013 Emmys, as The Colbert Report ended the Daily Show‘s decade-long streak of winning best Variety Series. Colbert’s show has won two writing Emmys, in 2008 and 2010, but this was the show’s first win in the category of Outstanding Variety Series, where it’s been nominated eight times, including this year. TVNewser Jeff Daniels, who plays anchorman Will McAvoy on HBO’s Newsroom took home the Emmy for best actor in a drama Sunday. CBS News In one notable acceptance speech Sunday night, the agent remained unthanked. So did the family, and actually everyone else, when Merritt Wever won best supporting actress in a comedy series at the Emmy Awards on Sunday night. In fact, Wever, of Showtime’s Nurse Jackie, spoke so briefly that all she said was: “Thank you so very much. Um, I gotta go, bye.” Entertainment Weekly / PopWatch Midway through hour three of the Emmys, host Neil Patrick Harris joked: “No one in America is winning their office pool.” Except that wasn’t really a joke: The 2013 Emmy Awards featured seven big upsets in the major primetime awards. Longtime also-rans got their moment in the sun. Some low-key performances beat out showier and more popular contenders. Fox News Each year’s Emmy Awards show has a tribute slideshow featuring TV stars who died in the past year, but the 2013 Emmys took remembrances to a whole new level, featuring stand-alone tributes to no fewer than six deceased stars. Variety About halfway through the Emmys, it became clear that the producers were sort of irritated they had to interrupt their variety show with, you know, awards. And that seemed to color the rest of the evening, which featured some fine staged moments but few spontaneous ones, largely because producers were so quick to play everyone off, they didn’t give the show any room to breathe.

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The Daily Beast to Continue Publishing

The Daily Beast lives on. According to well, The Daily Beast, the site will continue publishing, despite many rumors to the contrary. “The Daily Beast is not for sale and is not closing,” wrote Rhona Murphy, interim CEO of The Daily Beast, in a memo to staffers. “IAC has approved in concept the operating budget for 2014.”

When the news broke that Tina Brown was departing the site, many people — including us — thought that the Daily Beast might be sold or shut down. However, things are apparently all good. And there were many statements to remind us of that.

Here’s one from managing director Deidre Depke: “The Daily Beast continues to grow at a robust rate and we are committed to bringing the business into a new era of strength and stability.” And another from John Avlon, The Daily Beast’s executive editor: “Our great team of writers and reporters keeps The Daily Beast on the cutting edge of digital news, delivering print quality at web speed.”

However, our favorite by far was from Barry Diller, who couldn’t help but stick another fork in Newsweek during his praise of The Daily Beast:

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Tina Brown Out at IAC | Esquire‘s 9/11 Fiasco | NR Sues Cory Booker


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IAC And Daily Beast Editor Tina Brown to Part Ways (BuzzFeed / Business)
Tina Brown, who sought to reinvent buzzy magazine journalism on the Internet in the form of The Daily Beast, and IAC have agreed to part ways. According to a source with direct knowledge of the situation, The Daily Beast parent company IAC, owned by media mogul Barry Diller, does not plan to renew Brown’s contract when it expires in January. The decision has been made for the two sides to part ways, said the source, but precise details of the separation are still being worked out. Brown confirmed her departure in both a meeting with staff and in an email sent to friends and contacts after BuzzFeed broke the news on Wednesday. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Brown will split with parent-company IAC next year and launch her own company, Tina Brown Live Media, according to sources with knowledge of her plans. The contract negotiations have been going on for the last few months, according to a source familiar with the discussions, and the split has been a “long time coming.” Daily Beast Brown is optimistic about the future of The Daily Beast. “The great thing about change is that you get influxes of new energy and you get different ideas,” she said. “I will be one click away from you every morning,” she told staffers, and added, “I will continue to see you grow.” Capital New York Brown, who was once editor of The New Yorker and Vanity Fair, told Daily Beast staff she will take her successful Women in the World Conference, and its staff, with her, according to a source who was present at the newsroom gathering. Rhona Murphy, The Daily Beast’s CEO, said during the meeting that there are currently no plans to close the site, which is still in the process of extricating itself from Newsweek, and that a budget was being planned through 2014, the source said. Mashable A source claiming to be close to the negotiations emphasized that Brown — not IAC — “ultimately made the decision to walk away from The Daily Beast” and that it’s “more of a mutual separating of ways.” The source added that Brown’s relationship with IAC Chairman Barry Diller is “not strained” and she continues to have “a ton of respect” for him. FishbowlNY Brown’s departure will surely kick “The Daily Beast is dead” rumors into high gear. The site is on pace to lose $12 million this year, so don’t be shocked if IAC decides to sell or completely shut it down.

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Daily Beast to Lose $12 Million This Year

Now that IAC has sold off Newsweek, what does the future hold for The Daily Beast and Tina Brown? The Daily Beast might one day disappear because — according to Adweek — it’s currently on pace to lose $12 million this year. That’s not likely to inspire much confidence in Barry Diller, who famously called buying Newsweek “a mistake.

As for Brown, Adweek guesses she’ll either stay at The Daily Beast, shift her focus to the Women in The World Summit, or maybe take some time off to finish her book on Hillary Clinton. In other words, no one has any idea what the hell Brown will do next.

At least Brown still has some support. David Remnick, The New Yorker’s editor-in-chief, told Adweek that he is “always rooting for her.”

It’s Not Tina Brown’s Fault That Newsweek Failed

Now that Newsweek has been sold yet again, it’s time to examine who is at fault for its downfall. The popular target is Tina Brown. She certainly receives the brunt of a New York Times piece, which features interviews with Newsweek staffers who claim that Brown’s style destroyed the magazine. And while that’s true, Brown is not solely to blame.

Brown is famous for being irrational and chaotic. As the Times notes, she sent staffers to Paris despite there being no promise of a story. She once asked Dirk Barnett, Newsweek’s former creative director, to design 82 covers in just seven days. When she did approve covers, they were often ridiculous. Brown even claimed that she knew about Breaking Bad before anyone else at Newsweek, which sort of shows how kooky she can be.

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Newsweek Sold to IBT Media

IBT Media, publishers of the International Business Times, are your new Newsweek owners. IBT is a digital-only company, so Newsweek will continue as it has since the print edition was folded. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

In 2010, Sidney Harman purchased Newsweek from The Washington Post Company. Harman then entered into a partnership with Barry Diller and IAC. Tina Brown — editor of Newsweek and The Daily Beast — tried her best, but aside from generating some catchy/creepy covers, Newsweek continued to flounder. After the magazine was folded, Diller even admitted that being involved with Newsweek was a mistake.

IAC will operate Newsweek for the next 60 days, after that, it’s all IBT Media’s. For better or worse.

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