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Posts Tagged ‘Barry Diller’

Barry Diller Makes Waves with Grandiose Park Plan

Curbed NY’s headline for today’s announcement that IAC chairman Barry Diller and his wife Diane von Furstenberg are endowing a proposed 2.7-acre offshore park and performance space in place of Pier 54 reads: “$130 Million ‘Pier 55′ Park Looks Like Something Out of Avatar. But for a majority of the New York City residents commenting in response to today’s front-page New York Times article, the tenor is more Titanic.

HobokenPierC

If completed, the project will sit directly across the Hudson River from Hoboken’s Pier C (pictured). From the NYT comments:

WR: If this private island gets built, who will bear the cost when its piers start rotting – yes cement rots – earlier then expected? Diller did say 20 years, obviously that is when engineers have told him the thing should start falling apart.

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Jon Steinberg on The MailOnline’s Plans for World Domination, New Hire Piers Morgan

LunchAtMichaelsIt was a true media mashup at Michael’s today as the joint was jam-packed with famous faces (Katie Couric and Barbara Walters at separate tables; Natalie Morales) and moguls (David Zinczenko), while the usual suspects upped the volume to near ear-splitting levels. I had to lean in to catch every word uttered by Jon Steinberg, who joined me for lunch to dish about his new-ish gig as CEO of the Daily Mail‘s MailOnline.com, yesterday’s announcement that Piers Morgan was joining the site and his old guard inspirations in this new-media world.

Diane Clehane and Jon Steinberg

Diane Clehane and Jon Steinberg

I suggested Jon and I do “Lunch” after I interviewed him earlier this year for a Gotham cover story I was doing on New York City’s most powerful millennials, for which he talked about his role in creating  BuzzFeed as its president and chief operating officer. During Steinberg’s tenure, BuzzFeed became a global brand and went from a staff of 15 to more than 500. Turns out our chat was fortuitously timed. Days before the story was set to go to press in May, Jon announced that after four years at the helm of the social news and entertainment site, he was stepping down to pursue his next big adventure. “Having built this place with Jonah [Peretti, BuzzFeed’s founder and CEO] and the rest of the team, I want to go through that rush again, and there is a certain amount of freedom that I want,” he said at the time. Since when we spoke for the Gotham piece, he’d told me he believed “freedom and independence are the new status symbols,” I was eager to see what his next move would be. A short time later, he announced he was joining MailOnline as chief executive officer of North America. Today he arrived fresh off the set of CNBC, where he appears three times a week as a contributor on Squawk on the Street. Said Jon of his television gig: “I love it because they operate it like a startup. They had the idea for it and just weeks later, it was on the air. It’s a great team.” But clearly, he’s even more enthusiastic about his top spot at MailOnline. “I wasn’t the CEO before and that’s something I’ve always wanted. I get to make a lot more decisions now,” he told me today, between bites of chicken paillard. And he’s making plenty.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ABC Debuts New View | CNN Ordered to Rehire Union Staff

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The View Premieres With New Co-Hosts, Queen Barbara Walters (TVNewser)
A revamped The View premiered Monday morning with its original co-executive producer sitting in a Queen’s throne getting doused with affection. “Thank you my pals,” Barbara Walters said as co-hosts Whoopi Goldberg, Rosie O’Donnell, Nicolle Wallace and Rosie Perez looked toward her throne. LostRemote On social media, fans were not really feeling the new View. The biggest complaints were about the new format. Many complained about the new hosts, although Perez was an all-around favorite. THR / The Live Feed Goldberg kicked off the premiere of its 18th season by introducing it as “the newer View,” filmed in an ABC Broadcast Center studio space and featuring a tweaked logo. “We’re gonna try a lot of new stuff — some of it will work and some of it won’t, but the thing that will never change is its great conversations with great women.” Mediaite O’Donnell caught the audience up with what’s been going on in her personal life since then. They then gave the floor over to Perez and Wallace to introduce themselves. Perez talked about a Broadway show she’s working on and her philanthropic efforts, while Wallace got to share her background in politics and the Bush administration. When Wallace mentioned she was a Republican, O’Donnell piped up, “I really like her, I swear to God!” Variety The audience is more prominent and appears more frequently during the program. A new producer, Bill Wolff, who once oversaw MSNBC’s flagship Rachel Maddow, will now run proceedings.

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Critic Rolls His Eyes at Rosario Dawson’s NYT Character

ShutterstockRosarioDawsonThough relatively limited, the pantheon of New York Times reporters committed to film and TV has included such memorable characters as Sam Waterston‘s Sydney Schanberg in 1984′s The Killing Fields and Matt Borner‘s Felix Turner in this year’s HBO drama The Normal Heart.

Another NYT movie reporter is about to hit the big screen, via Chris Rock‘s Top Five. But according to Grantland’s Wesley Morris, this newsroom derivation is memorable for entirely different reasons:

Rock stars as Andre Allen, a recovering alcoholic and comedy star being trailed by the least-likely-ever culture reporter for the New York Times. It’s not that she’s played by Rosario Dawson. It’s that the plot twist around her character doesn’t make ethical sense. Together, they visit his New York universe and hers (she’s in recovery, too)…

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Diane von Furstenberg Partners with E! to Find ‘Global Brand Ambassador’

These days, next to cooking, there’s no surer reality TV bet than fashion. Even more so when the person at the center of a fashion project is a famous, glamorous name.

DianevonFurstenberg

Announced this week and coming in late 2014, The DVF Project will combine a behind-the-scenes look at Mrs. Barry Diller‘s empire with the golden-ticket premise of a group of chosen young women vying for a position with her company. Think of it as The Diane’s version of The Apprentice:

Diane von Furstenberg is one of fashion’s most innovative designers and a true icon who inspires women to seize opportunities,” said Jeff Olde, executive vice president, programming and development, E!. “There is a magical, somewhat Willy Wonka aspect to the world Diane wants to create with this show. That is if Willy Wonka were a fabulous, glamorous fashion icon willing to share her secrets with talented young women dedicated to learning them.”

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THR Lands Interview with Pat Kingsley

As the specter of Nikki Finke has been to entertainment journalism, so too once was the aura of Pat Kingsley to celebrity PR. And given Hollywood Reporter executive features editor Stephen Galloway‘s wily ways, we’re not at all surprised that it is he who landed Kingsley’s first official post-retirement interview.

THRPatKingsleyImageGalloway paid a visit to the 81-year-old Kingsley at her Pacific Palisades home the day before Thanksgiving. She remains too classy to spill the beans on former clients and any major contretemps (except for The TODAY Show and Jeff Zucker; what does that say about Zucker?). Rather, the joy of this feature comes largely from the small details about Kingsley’s current life and daily routine:

She gets up around 7:30 or 8 a.m., makes breakfast and does a little exercise. Then she switches on CNN (“I want the news, not opinions”), watches that and sports but relatively little entertainment…

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Norm Pearlstine Networks With Bonnie Fuller

LunchAtMichaelsWe’re going to file this week’s lunch in under ‘The more things change, the more they stay the same.’ Aside from a dining room full of the usual Wednesdays at Michael’s suspects, comprised of moguls (Barry Diller), media mavens (Bonnie Fuller, Connie Anne Phillips) and money men who keep the lights on all over town (Alan Patricof), I had an illuminating chat with Donald Albrecht, curator of architecture and design at the Museum of the City of New York and the editor/contributor of the new book, Gilded New York Design, Fashion and Society (The Monacelli Press). We were introduced by Dan Scheffey, who, in his past life, has handled public relations for Disney, Miramax and most recently toiled at Conde Nast. Dan is currently working on Monacelli’s fall book list and is gearing up to launch the Spring 2014 list with Ellen Rubin. When he mentioned Gilded New York to me some months ago, I immediately wanted to know more. Donald, an independent curator specializing in the decorative arts and architecture, joined us to talk about his work on both the exhibition and the book on New York’s Gilded Age of the late 19th century.

Dan Scheffey, Diane Clehane and Donald Albrecht

From left: Dan Scheffey, Diane Clehane and Donald Albrecht

By way of introduction to the period he explained, “The city’s old and new money used architecture, interior design, fashion and events — even lunch and dinners — as markers of status.” See where I’m going with this?  I thought you might.

Donald, who traded his career as an architect to focus on curating exhibitions and writing (“I found working solely in architecture really boring”), explained his love of curating exhibitions as a way of producing “visual culture.” His current exhibition (which shares the same name of the companion book) “Gilded New York” runs through the end of next year and features a stunning collection of objects that lend a window into the fascinating lives of the early swells of New York City whose great fortunes built the vast Fifth Avenue mansions during what was arguably city’s most glamorous era. Among the relics of this bygone age visitors to the museum can see: an ”Electric Light” dress by couturier Charles Frederick Worth dress once worn by Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt. The gown (which didn’t really light up) earned its name from the glittering crystals that illuminated the bodice (a newspaper at the time breathlessly reported it had been trimmed in diamonds), Tiffany & Co.’s Bon Bonniere, a miniature purse designed to hold bon bons or small pieces of candy to be discreetly carried so it could be enjoyed while dancing, and a swan-billed flask crafted from engraved glass and silver. The funny thing is I have no doubt any one of the artifacts would be right at home worn by Sarah Jessica Parker or carried by — dare we say it – Kanye West — at the Met Ball, no?

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Walter Isaacson, Barry Diller and Dylan Lauren Go Hollywood

LunchAtMichaelsIt was the usual head-spinning scene at Michael’s today as the decibel level rose to epic levels in every corner of the dining room throughout lunch. But all was tranquil (at least for the moment) when I arrived shortly before noon. There, I was greeted with the sight of two minions from Bonnie Fuller‘s office at Hollywoodlife.com who were arranging seating cards and ordering Pellegrino for Bonnie’s monthly schmoozefest. The power gals-in-training stayed just long enough to change into their high heels and shepherd the overflowing group of media mavens and social swans (and Dylan Lauren!) into the lounge for a round of air kissing before they finally settled into their perch in the bay window at Table One. Oh, to be young and ambitious.

I was joined today by two of my favorite Michael’s regulars who I met, of course, in the dining room many moons ago: producer and Democratic booster Joan Gelman and Robert Zimmerman, founder and partner of Zimmerman/Edelson Long Island’s leading public relations and marketing firm, who somehow also finds time to appear on CNN, Fox and MSNBC as a political commentator. On-air (and in conversation, of course) Robert offers well reasoned arguments against the extremists on both sides. “Too much attention focuses on being quotable, not credible. Too many commentators operate in a fact-free environment. Ann Coulter has become the Larry Flynt of political literature. Both live in a world of exploitation and filth,” said the Democratic National Committeeman (now in his 13th year in the position). Come on Robert, tell us how you really feel.

Robert Zimmerman Diane Clehane and Joan Gelman

Robert Zimmerman, Diane Clehane and Joan Gelman

I always look forward to our bi-annual Michael’s lunches because besides being two of the nicest – and funniest people in the room — Joan and Robert can always be counted on for some tasty dish on what’s really going on in any number of social, business and political circles in New York.

While some of the juiciest dish is off the record, we did cover a lot of ground on the current political scene. I had to ask Robert what he thought of the two biggest headaches plaguing the Obama administration that are getting plenty of media coverage. On the Obamacare website woes, Robert offered this: “If it were up to my Republican friends, we would have given up on NASA, Social Security and Medicare because each of them had difficult launches. Medicare took six years to establish after President Roosevelt it signed into law. The website will be fixed. The bigger issue will be if people are getting a better deal in terms of cost and coverage. That will determine the future of Obamacare and, to a large extent, Obama’s legacy.” Read more

Barry Diller, David Zaslav and the Exclusive on Star Jones’ TV Plans

LunchAtMichaelsIt was business as usual at Michael’s today, which means it was wall-to-wall moguls (Barry Diller, David Zaslav), EICs (Liz Vaccariello, Alison Brower) and TV newsers (Ron Insana, Felicia Taylor and Lynn Sherr) – and plenty of other famous faces. I was joined by Star Jones, one of my favorite regulars at 55th and Fifth, who I met when I was one of the first reporters to cover the freshman season of The View. Suffice to say there’s been plenty that’s happened in Star’s professional and personal life since then, and she’s come through it all wiser, funnier and more determined than ever to forge her own path. Sitting at Table 1 today, nibbling on her kale salad with a side of salmon, she practically glowed with happiness.

She was excited to tell me about her role as chief development officer and national spokesperson for the National Association of Professional Women, where she is serving as a passionate advocate for members on healthcare and equal pay, which, she said, has become a tent pole issue. With most of NAPW’s members in middle management and plenty of entrepreneurs in the ranks, Star is all about “stiletto networking,” as she told me, which involves developing programming for the membership that will help empower them to reach their goals. “This is an opportunity for me to use all my experience and not just be in one box as an attorney, talk show host or author. Women’s lives are comprised of so many difference facets; it’s exciting to act as a advocate for NAPW, as I’ve done with my work for the American Heart Association, for causes that I’m passionate about.” She has also created the NAPW Foundation which, in addition to AHA, supports the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Dress for Success and Girls Inc. Star also brings another valuable skill to NAPW:  finding the right benefits and services to offer to its members. “You know I’m good at getting perks for the sisters!”

Michael Cominotto, Diane Clehane, Star Jones and Katherine Butkevich

From left: Michael Cominotto, Diane Clehane, Star Jones and Katherine Butkevich

Ever since she forged her age on her driver’s license (upping it from 15 to 16) so she could get a job at McDonald’s (“The statute has run out on that crime!”), Star has been creating unforeseen opportunities for herself that have defied expectations. In the early 90s, she went from the Brooklyn DA’s office to the small screen when she was tapped as a commentator for Court TV and Inside Edition, covering high profile cases like William Kennedy Smith’s rape trial and The OJ Simpson case. By the time she left her seat at the table with Barbara Walters on her ABC chatfest, she was one of daytime television’s most famous faces. Of her run on The View: “They were the best eight years of my life,” she said before adding with some laughter, “But I was on for nine years and that last year was a little rough.” But, like they say, time heals all wounds, and Star reports her relationship with Walters is better than ever. Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Primetime Emmys Awarded | Daily Beast to Go On | Politico CEO Out


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Breaking Bad, Modern Family Are Top Shows at Emmys (USA Today)
As Breaking Bad continues its intense journey to its final moments, its cast and crew were all smiles at the Emmy Awards. With its series climax airing in a week, the AMC show won best drama series on Sunday night. “Man, I did not see this coming,” said creator Vince Gilligan, whom star Anna Gunn called a “mad genius” when accepting her outstanding supporting actress Emmy. CNET Netflix won its first Emmy award Sunday night, as David Fincher won for best directing of a drama series. The online subscription-video service, which has been touting itself of late as the “world’s leading Internet television provider,” was nominated for 14 primetime Emmy awards this year, the first time that an online-only service had shows in the running for one of television’s top creative honors. WSJ The Emmy win could boost Netflix’s prestige in Hollywood as an outlet for high-quality original series and further encourage writers, producers and actors to consider Netflix projects at a time when competition for talent among TV networks is as fierce as ever. Deadline Hollywood It was comedy ladies’ night at the Primetime Emmys as women swept both the comedy writing and directing categories for the first time in history. 30 Rock creator/executive producer Tina Fey and writer Tracey Wigfield won the writing Emmy for the series finale, while Gail Mancuso was recognized for the “Arrested” episode of ABC’s Modern Family. Mancuso is only the second woman ever to win the Emmy for comedy directing, following Betty Thomas, who won for Dream On 20 years ago. THR / The Live Feed Stephen Colbert dethroned former boss Jon Stewart at the 2013 Emmys, as The Colbert Report ended the Daily Show‘s decade-long streak of winning best Variety Series. Colbert’s show has won two writing Emmys, in 2008 and 2010, but this was the show’s first win in the category of Outstanding Variety Series, where it’s been nominated eight times, including this year. TVNewser Jeff Daniels, who plays anchorman Will McAvoy on HBO’s Newsroom took home the Emmy for best actor in a drama Sunday. CBS News In one notable acceptance speech Sunday night, the agent remained unthanked. So did the family, and actually everyone else, when Merritt Wever won best supporting actress in a comedy series at the Emmy Awards on Sunday night. In fact, Wever, of Showtime’s Nurse Jackie, spoke so briefly that all she said was: “Thank you so very much. Um, I gotta go, bye.” Entertainment Weekly / PopWatch Midway through hour three of the Emmys, host Neil Patrick Harris joked: “No one in America is winning their office pool.” Except that wasn’t really a joke: The 2013 Emmy Awards featured seven big upsets in the major primetime awards. Longtime also-rans got their moment in the sun. Some low-key performances beat out showier and more popular contenders. Fox News Each year’s Emmy Awards show has a tribute slideshow featuring TV stars who died in the past year, but the 2013 Emmys took remembrances to a whole new level, featuring stand-alone tributes to no fewer than six deceased stars. Variety About halfway through the Emmys, it became clear that the producers were sort of irritated they had to interrupt their variety show with, you know, awards. And that seemed to color the rest of the evening, which featured some fine staged moments but few spontaneous ones, largely because producers were so quick to play everyone off, they didn’t give the show any room to breathe.

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