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Posts Tagged ‘Bradley Manning’

The Guardian Issues Fantastic Oscars Correction

The Guardian issued the above correction to remind the world that not all Bradley’s are the same.

(h/t: Elena Zak)

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ESPN Dumps Frontline | Manning Puzzles Journos | Kochs Walk From LA Times


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ESPN Pulls Out of Frontline Concussion Investigation (Deadspin)
For a while now, ESPN’s big alibi, the thing Bristol would trot out any time someone questioned the company’s journalistic bona fides, was its joint investigation into NFL head injuries with PBS’ Frontline. Now that’s done with. ESPN said in a statement: “Because ESPN is neither producing nor exercising editorial control over the Frontline documentaries, there will be no co-branding involving ESPN on the documentaries or their marketing materials. The use of ESPN’s marks could incorrectly imply that we have editorial control. As we have in the past, we will continue to cover the concussion story through our own reporting.” PBS / Frontline “…[We] regret ESPN’s decision to end a collaboration that has spanned the last 15 months and is based on the work of ESPN reporters Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru, as well as Frontline’s own original journalism. Over that time, we’ve enjoyed a productive partnership with ESPN’s investigative program, Outside the Lines, jointly publishing and co-branding several ground-breaking articles on our respective websites and on their broadcast. We’ve been in sync on the goals of our reporting: to present the deepest accounting so far of the league’s handling of questions around the long-term impact of concussions. This editorial partnership was similar to our many other collaborations with news organizations over the years.” TVNewser The partnership resulted in a number of long-form articles about the NFL’s response to concussions, as well as a number of reports on Outside the Lines, ESPN’s acclaimed newsmagazine. NYT The NFL was not supportive of the documentary. Greg Aiello, a spokesman for the league, said it declined to make commissioner Roger Goodell and other executives available for it. The league allowed the doctors who advise it on concussions to decide themselves if they wanted to take part. The Atlantic Wire ESPN has previously faced criticism over its coverage of the impact of concussions and head injuries on NFL players. Because the network makes a lot of money from broadcasting NFL games, there is concern of an acute conflict of interest going on between the editorial and business sides of the Connecticut-based company.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Manning Sentenced | Fired Fox Exec Speaks | Finke Out at Deadline?


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Bradley Manning Sentenced to 35 Years in Prison for WikiLeaks Disclosures (The Verge)
Bradley Manning’s court-martial reached an end Wednesday, with Army Colonel Denise Lind sentencing him to 35 years in prison. She also ordered a reduction in rank to private, a forfeiture of all pay and a dishonorable discharge. NYT The sentence is the longest ever handed down in a case involving a leak of United States government information for the purpose of having the information reported to the public. Private Manning, 25, will be eligible for parole in about seven years, his lawyer said. The Guardian Manning will send a personal plea to Barack Obama next week for a presidential pardon. “When I chose to disclose classified information, I did so out of a love to my country and a sense of duty to others,” Manning will tell Obama. “If you deny my request for a pardon, I will serve my time knowing that sometimes you have to pay a heavy price to live in a free society.” The New Yorker / Close Read The WikiLeaks files have been a useful and important part of what had been about a dozen underdeveloped debates about our wars and foreign policy. The prosecutors, despite using words like betrayal frequently, had trouble, at the sentencing, showing specific harm, as opposed to diffuse embarrassment. And against 35 years, a hundred and twelve days seems like a paltry penalty for Manning’s extreme solitary confinement and his abuse. Where is the deterrent for that? HuffPost Manning’s sentencing on Wednesday received about as much attention from the cable news networks that every other phase of his trial did — that is to say, not a whole lot. As they did when he was declared guilty, networks briefly treated the story as a piece of major breaking news, and then moved away quickly. Though they have learned how to talk endlessly about stories with no new details, the networks clearly felt that Manning’s sentencing to 35 years in prison was not worthy of that treatment. Today.com Manning revealed he intends to live out the remainder of his life as a woman. “I am Chelsea Manning. I am female,” the Army private wrote in a statement read on Today Thursday. “Given the way that I feel, and have felt since childhood, I want to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible. I hope that you will support me in this transition.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Manning Didn’t Aid Enemy | Plain Dealer Layoffs | Facebook TV-Style Ads?


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Manning Is Acquitted of Aiding the Enemy (NYT)
A military judge on Tuesday found Pfc. Bradley Manning not guilty of “aiding the enemy” for his release of hundreds of thousands of military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks for publication on the Internet, rejecting the government’s unprecedented effort to bring such a charge in a leak case. HuffPost The verdict in the Manning trial did not receive the kind of rolling network coverage afforded to other recent court cases. Whereas trials like George Zimmerman’s or even Jodi Arias’ were treated to hours of analysis, dissection and attention, the news that the man responsible for the biggest leak of classified material in American history had been hit with charges that could keep him in prison for more than 100 years was deemed worthy of one, or at most two, segments during the hour following the verdict. Mediaite Jeremy Scahill, reporter for The Nation and author of the book Dirty Wars, joined Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman on Tuesday where he reacted to the verdict of a military court which found Manning guilty of a number of charges relating to the release of classified national security documents. Scahill lambasted the news media for largely ignoring what he called one of the most important cases in national history. National Journal Depending on your point of view, Manning is either a tragic hero or a traitor, or maybe something in between. The now 25-year-old’s personal problems were numerous, coming from an unstable, abusive home, dealing with being a gay member of the military under Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, also questioning his gender identity. The military assessed him as having an anxiety disorder. Three years ago, he was arrested after sending what is regarded as the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history to WikiLeaks, including a video showing U.S. military personnel shooting down two Reuters employees and 250,000 diplomatic cables. The Guardian / Comment Is Free Had the judge found Manning guilty of aiding the enemy, she would have set a terrible precedent. For the first time, an American court — albeit a military court — would have said it was a potentially capital crime simply to give information to a news organization, because in the Internet era an enemy would ultimately have been able to read what was leaked. However, if journalism dodged one figurative bullet, it faces many more in this era. TVNewser The three general cable news channels previewed the impending verdict at the top of the hour, with Fox News reporting the verdict at 1:05, followed by MSNBC at 1:08 and CNN at 1:09. No cameras were allowed in the courtroom, and journalists were unable to report the verdict until they were released from the room.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Tamron Hall’s New Gig | Manning Trial Drama | NY Post EIC in Australia


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Tamron Hall to Host New Crime Show (Chicago Sun-Times / Voices)
Tamron Hall, the MSNBC host and NBC News correspondent — and former morning show co-anchor of Fox 32 News in Chicago — will host Deadline: Crime with Tamron Hall, a new weekly crime investigation series for Discovery’s ID (Investigation Discovery) network. The announcement was made by the peacock network at the semi-annual Television Correspondents Association meetings in Los Angeles. Hall has a direct, personal connection to violent crime. Her older sister was a murder victim in a case that is still officially unsolved. Deadline Hollywood In each one-hour episode, Hall will be joined by other correspondents to explore crimes. Among them: journalists Michelle Sigona and Angeline Hartmann and veteran America’s Most Wanted correspondent Tom Morris Jr. The new series also will feature appearances from ID regulars Aphrodite Jones (host of True Crime with Aphrodite Jones) and Keith Beauchamp (host of The Injustice Files). HuffPost Hall will host the program while continuing to anchor NewsNation on MSNBC. The first episode will look at the murder of a mentally ill wife and mother of two, and Robert Chambers, otherwise known as the “Preppie Killer.”

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LA Times Editorial Helps Bring Light to Treatment of Bradley Manning

Belated plaudits to the LA Times, for its Monday editorial calling attention to the prison conditions of alleged WikiLeaks source Bradley Manning, at the Marine detention center in Quantico, Virginia.

[Manning] has been incarcerated at Quantico for five months and has yet to receive the military equivalent of a preliminary hearing.

Nevertheless, Manning is in “maximum custody.” Also, under a “Protection of Injury” order, he is confined to his cell for 23 hours a day, even though his lawyer says a psychologist has determined he isn’t a threat to himself. His lawyer also says that Manning is denied sheets and is unable to exercise in his cell, and that he is not allowed to sleep between 5 a.m. and 8 p.m. If he attempts to sleep during those hours, he is made to sit up or stand by his guards…

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Glenn Greenwald Trashes Wired For Withholding Bradley Manning Transcripts

Salon’s Glenn Greenwald has a long and fascinating piece attacking Wired’s Senior Editor Kevin Poulsen for withholding lengthy transcripts of a conversation between WikiLeaks source Bradley Manning and the man who turned Manning in: Adrian Lamo.

For more than six months, Wired’s Senior Editor Kevin Poulsen has possessed — but refuses to publish — the key evidence in one of the year’s most significant political stories: the arrest of U.S. Army PFC Bradley Manning for allegedly acting as WikiLeaks’ source. In late May, Adrian Lamo — at the same time he was working with the FBI as a government informant against Manning — gave Poulsen what he purported to be the full chat logs between Manning and Lamo in which the Army Private allegedly confessed to having been the source for the various cables, documents and video that WikiLeaks released throughout this year. In interviews with me in June, both Poulsen and Lamo confirmed that Lamo placed no substantive restrictions on Poulsen with regard to the chat logs: Wired was and remains free to publish the logs in their entirety….

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