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Posts Tagged ‘BusinessWeek.com’

Bloomberg Hires New Global Head of Web

Paul Maya has been named global head of Bloomberg.com and Businessweek.com. Prior to, Maya was vice president, Technology at CNN Digital where he lead its digital technology strategy and product implementation.

In his role at Bloomberg, he will be responsible for the general management, strategic planning, and branding for the two consumer-facing websites. Maya will report to Andy Lack, CEO of Bloomberg Multimedia.

“We are delighted to welcome a creative thinker and proven strategist like Paul to Bloomberg,” said Lack.  ”His experience building digital businesses that integrate news, data and video will be enormously valuable as we continue to build out our next generation of global web products.”

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John Byrne BusinessWeek Departure Rumors Turn True

johnbyrne .jpgWhen false reports of the deaths of Lady Gaga or Jeff Goldblum get blasted all over Twitter, it becomes a trend piece in The New York Times. “The Internet Who Cried Wolf” serves as a gentle reminder that not everything you read online is true.

The media equivalent of course, would be Anna Wintour‘s departure from Vogue. There have been so many rumors, sworn testimonies and first-hand accounts of the editrix leaving Condé Nast that sometimes it seems like she’s hanging on there just to spite the morning’s headlines.

But recently, the magazine departure watchdogs have had a new person of interest: BusinessWeek.com‘s editor-in-chief John Byrne. Except this time, the gossipers were right. Turns out, Byrne is leaving the Bloomberg LP-owned business magazine to launch a digital media company in San Francisco.

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Departing BusinessWeek Tweets

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News of this week’s layoffs at BusinessWeek is starting to trickle on to Twitter.

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Looks like technology editor Steve Wildstrom and innovation and design writer Damian Joseph are among laid off by new owner Bloomberg LP. Good luck guys!

We’ll keep updating with Twitter news, but if you know of anyone else who got dumped by BusinessWeek (as Joseph says), drop us a line

Update: More tweets after the jump

Earlier: Bloomberg Looks To Cut BusinessWeek Staffers

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Bloomberg Starts To Put Together BusinessWeek Staff

businessweek_3.pngToday’s New York Times “Media Decoder” blog post about the restructuring of BusinessWeek post-Bloomberg LP‘s acquisition has a funny ring to it. We already know that editor Stephen Adler is stepping down, as well as president Keith Fox. So who will be manning the new magazine?

Apparently, the people who decided to stick around. But, unless you’re reading carefully, you’d never know it. The Times mentions Bloomberg “has selected a few staff members to make the leap to Bloomberg BusinessWeek,” but you can’t tell right away if those staffers are from the magazine or Bloomberg. Except if you are intimately familiar with the BusinessWeek masthead.

The “new” magazine editors — Ellen Pollock, John Byrne, and Ciro Scotti — are actually just continuing in their former positions. (Mainly, it seems like the story is just there to address rumors of Pollock and Byrne’s departures.) Jessica Sibley, who came in to help the ailing magazine in the role of senior vice president and worldwide publisher back in February of 2008 will be the new magazine’s publisher as Fox stays behind at McGraw-Hill. The Times post is titled “Bloomberg Builds a Staff For BusinessWeek” but it should really be “Bloomberg Announces Who’s Decided Not To Leave.”

Someone who is leaving — Roger Neal, the current general manager of BusinessWeek.com. His staff will now report to Bloomberg’s Kevin Krim.

Also of note: All BusinessWeek employees will be moving to Bloomberg headquarters on December 4, unless they already work in New York, in which case they can stay at their former offices until the Bloomberg building has room for them.

Memo to BusinessWeek staffers after the jump.

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Excitement For BusinessWeek Deal At MPA Conference

MIS.jpgYesterday, we spent a few hours at the Magazine Publishers of America‘s Magazine Innovation Summit. In between panels and interviews like The New York TimesDavid Carr‘s Q&A with Ken Auletta of The New Yorker (right), we got a chance to catch up with some of New York media’s movers and shakers and pick their brains.

First, we asked Carr what he thought of Bloomberg LP’s acquisition of BusinessWeek. The media columnist was practically giddy with excitement. “It’s great news for people like you and me,” Carr told us, complaining that the media industry has been sorely lacking in fun deals to report on. “I couldn’t help but get involved in Stephanie’s story,” he said referring to the article about the deal he co-bylined with Stephanie Clifford for the Times yesterday.

Carr’s excitement was mirrored by BusinessWeek.com‘s John Byrne, who interviewed Netflix CEO Reed Hastings after lunch.

“There was a little activity at BusinessWeek this morning,” Byrne said. He then went on to say how happy he was to be going to work for Bloomberg, remarking that it was a “great place” for the business magazine to be.

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Learning To Take A Risk: Mag Editors Meet To Discuss The Move From Print To Digital

dessert.jpgThe move from print to digital publications was the topic of the moment at mediabistro.com’s annual event for women’s magazine editors last night at ilili. (But really, isn’t it the topic of the moment at every media event these days?)

On hand to discuss were some female leaders in the digital field: Michelle Adams, the founder of new online shelter magazine Lonny; Caroline Little, former CEO of The Washington Post Co.’s digital side and current CEO of North America for Guardian News & Media; Newser co-founder and editor-in-chief Caroline Miller; Glam Media’s Jennifer Salant and founding editor of Hearst‘s Delish.com and RealBeauty.com, Nicole Stagg. We also ran into lots of online editors like Betsy Fast from InStyle.com and Julie Hochheiser from Seventeen.com (now senior Web editor of Hearst‘s Teen Network) and we shared a table with Folio Associate Editor Vanessa Voltolina, WWD Senior Accessories Editor Roxanne Robinson-Escriout, BusinessWeek.com Community Editor Diane Brady and Barbara Brody and Annemarie Conte from Woman’s Day.

Over dessert and coffee, moderator Sara Benincasa steered the conversation on topics about the changing face of content in the digital space, monetizing content like video and some of the challenges facing an industry that needs to change the way it thinks in order to survive.

Here are some highlights from last night’s discussion:

When asked what metrics are most important to them, all of the panelists said they were concerned with “engagement.”

“I usually look at page views or time spent on the site, although when looking at page views I’ll focus on how much content each person is reading,” Stagg said. “We want to deliver impressions.”

“The fantastic number of numbers are overwhelming,” Miller added. “It’s terrifying that you know way to much about what people are doing. With print magazines, you know so little. Online, you know so much it can be debilitating.”

Later, Miller called print advertising “a big con” because you can’t tell if anyone is actually noticing it and basing decisions on it, yet print advertising is much more expensive for marketers to buy than digital ads, which can provide real time metrics.

Panelists were also asked if they would ever consider setting up a paywall or subscriber-based model for their sites. The answer: a resounding no.

Little said paywalls are “bad news for news.” However, she thought up one example where paying for content would attract readers. “If I needed to read about one topic and every day I searched through several news sources for information about this topic and instead it could be delivered in a quick and easy way, I would be willing to pay for that. Because it would save me time,” she said.

The panelists also agreed they would prefer provocative content that generated comments, even if it was only provocative in order to draw commenters. “The commenters are often as interesting as the content,” Miller said.

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Mansueto Eyes BusinessWeek

bw.pngOver the past few weeks, BusinessWeek‘s own media columnist Jon Fine has been tracking the efforts by the magazine’s owner, McGraw-Hill, to sell the business pub.

Yesterday, he reported another possible bidder has entered the fray: Jon Mansueto, whose Mansueto Ventures also owns Inc. and Fast Company.

Mansueto has a history of buying magazines when they’re a good deal, Fine said. “In 2005 Mansueto bought Inc. and Fast Company from Gruner & Jahr for around $35 million in cash plus the assumption of certain liabilities,” he said.

Mansueto’s interest in BusinessWeek might have another explanation as well. John Byrne was editor of Fast Company when Manseuto purchased the magazine and he helped broker the deal that brought Fast Company and Inc. under Mansueto’s control. He left the company shortly thereafter to return to … BusinessWeek. He currently serves as executive editor of the magazine and editor-in-chief of Businessweek.com.

Meanwhile, as Fine previously reported, other parties are also interested in possibly making a bid for BusinessWeek and have taken meetings with the magazine’s management. New York magazine owner Bruce Wasserstein met with BusinessWeek insiders earlier this week, and three private equity firms have also shown an interest.

Read the whole story here.

Earlier: BusinessWeek Update: There Are Interest Parties

Internet Week Announces 2010 Dates

2010.pngGet your 2010 calendars ready: the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences and the Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting today announced the dates for next year’s Internet Week. The event will kick off on June 7, 2010, culminating with the 14th Annual Webby Awards on June 14.

This year’s Internet Week drew 15,000 people to events including mediabistro’s Circus — which featured speakers from The New York Times, BusinessWeek.com and Bravo, just to name a few.

Other companies like YouTube, Yelp, Digg, Time Warner, Digitas, CollegeHumor and Microsoft also participated in panels, exhibits, screenings and networking events that attracted big name media types like IAC‘s Barry Diller, Rupert Murdoch, Martha Stewart and Twitter founders Jack Dorsey and Biz Stone. What will next year bring?

Businessweek.com’s John Byrne Discusses Engagement

mbcircus.pngOur sister blog MediaJobsDaily has joined us at the Mediabistro Circus and they caught the presentation by Businessweek.com editor-in-chief John Byrne. Byrne’s presentation was called “New World Intimacy” and dealt with building reader engagement — something we think about every day.

“The secret of digital technology isn’t that you can do video, but that you can collaborate. Journalism has to become not a product but a process,” Byrne said.

As MediaJobsDaily reports, here some of the ways that BW.com is collaborating with its writers and readers in order to drive engagement:

* They put a module on every page on the site called “In Your Face,” in which they harvest the best comments on the site and feature the reader on the homepage.
* BW.com’s “bribed” journalists to respond to readers by promising better exposure on the site if journos engage.
* They have a feature called “My Take” with essays from readers, but they don’t take any submissions. They find articulate readers who are leaving lots of comments and commission essays from them.
* The 100 “best” commenters last year were given T-shirts, the top 10 got a dinner.

What do you think? What are some ways blogs like FishbowlNY can engage readers?

Cirque du Soleil At The Circus

cirque.png Our new editor is gearing up for her first trip to Mediabistro Circus on June 2-3 and excitement couldn’t be higher around here.

But just wait until the incredible performers of Cirque du Soleil take the stage on the last day of the Circus. Nothing makes us happier than acrobatic feats or displays of physical skill, like these two on the left, performing a tango on a unicycle (!) — and we’ve been assured they will be there next week.

Cirque du Soleil director of creation Carmen Ruest will also be on hand, speaking about turning a small company into the tumbling world-wide franchise it is today. And of course there will be tons of other fun speakers like Fiona Spruill of The New York Times and John Byrne, executive editor/editor-in-chief of BusinessWeek.com.

Come meet us there!