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Posts Tagged ‘David Petraeus’

Chuck Klosterman Discusses His Non-Role Role in the David Petraeus Scandal

The media demands that the non-essential be essential, and so we now know what Chuck Klosterman thinks of his peculiar involvement in the David Petraues scandal. In July, Klosterman addressed a question in his Ethicist column for New York Times Magazine that many now speculate was written by Paula Broadwell’s husband.

The question was from an anonymous husband whose wife was cheating on him with a “government executive,” whose job was “to manage a project whose progress is seen worldwide as a demonstration of American leadership.” It sounded a lot like something Broadwell’s husband would talk about. However, Hugo Lindgren, editor of the Times Magazine, denied this was the case.

Despite Lindgren’s statement, the media storm picked up, and so it was only natural that Klosterman addressed the situation.

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Newsweek Celebrates The Year With Interview Issue

091219_COVER-thumb6.jpgThe last big story to come out of Newsweek was the Sarah Palin cover controversy, with a cover image that had been previously featured on an issue of Runner’s World. Not the most glorious way to end out the year.

So The Washington Post Co.-owned magazine decided to end December on a high note, combining its interviews with some of the world’s biggest names into several different segments. There’s Newsweek editor Jon Meacham talking to both Hillary Clinton and Henry Kissinger about the role of Secretary of State (or “Hey, we’re relevant too!”), Bill Maher and Joe Scarborough thinking they are witty while discussing what it is that makes someone a pompous pundit good talk show host (was Dennis Miller not available?), and director Peter Jackson talking with James Cameron about how to make billions of dollars without ever technically selling out.

It’s an interesting tactic to pit one interviewee off another, and one that’s certain to sell copies, even without all the other interviews in the issue, like Bill Clinton, Timothy Geithner and Gen. David Petraeus.

Read More: Newsweek’s Interview Issue

Will Twitter Be Time‘s Person Of The Year?

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Time Managing Editor Richard Stengel, Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravesnthal, Barbara Walters and Tom Colicchio. Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Time Inc.

Last night, Time magazine managing editor Richard Stengel hosted a distinguished panel of guests to debate the question that always surfaces around this time of year: who should be Time‘s Person of the Year?

Stengel co-moderated the good-natured debate with former New York City Mayor Rudy GiulianiTime‘s Person of the Year in 2001. Panelists like Barbara Walters were encouraged to bring lists of possible Person of the Year candidates who met the title’s criteria, which includes having a global impact in the past year, for better or worse.

After running through lists of possible Person of the Year winners that included Bernie Madoff, Captain “Sully” Sullenberger and the Iranian protesters, the six-person panel ended the night in a three-three split. Walters agreed with TV personality Dr. Mehmet Oz and Gayle King that “the guys from Twitter,” meaning Jack Dorsey, Evan Williams and Biz Stone, should take the prize. Giuliani, “Top Chef” judge Tom Colicchio and Pittsburgh mayor Luke Ravensthal all voted for “the economy,” settling on some amalgam of Ben Bernanke and the unemployed American worker as Person of the Year.

Stengel didn’t give any hints about who would end up the final winner later this year, but we’ll see in a few weeks when the Person of the Year issue hits newsstands.

Read on for more of the panel’s suggestions.

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