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Posts Tagged ‘David Remnick’

Condé Nast Moves to One World Trade Center

The first wave of Condé Nast staffers are settling into their new digs at 1 World Trade Center this morning. The publishing house will occupy floors 20 through 44. It purchased the space — 1.2 million square feet — in 2012. But enough about that. We know you’re wondering which editor and staff will be on which floor.

According to The New York Times, Graydon Carter and Vanity Fair staffers have won that competition. While Condé’s CEO Chuck Townsend and other execs will be on the 42nd floor, Carter and Vanity Fair will be on the 41st. David Remnick and The New Yorker will take over the 38th floor; Anna Wintour and Vogue will take the 25th. The 44th floor will be occupied by Condé’s law firm.

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David Remnick: New Yorker Not Going Biweekly

New Yorker fans, breathe easy. David Remnick, the glossy’s editor, told WWD that there are no plans to cut back on publishing and make it a biweekly.

“I think the combination of a weekly print magazine and a daily website is perfect for us now I think if you go to a biweekly, you lose your seat at the table of what’s going on in the world a little bit,” he explained.

The entire interview is well worth a read, but below are some highlights.

On his relationship with Anna Wintour:

She has been nothing but supportive of what we do. If I need advice, I know that I have an extremely smart magazine person [whom] I can rely on, and she has been nothing but supportive of The New Yorker doing what it should be doing.

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Editors Give Derek Jeter Advice

Derek Jeter GDerek Jeter, the greatest baseball player of all time forever and ever, recently launched his own sports site — The Players’ Tribune. The site will feature content penned by pro athletes. Pro athletes, as you know, are not pro writers.

In an effort to help Jeter, Digiday asked several quality editors to dole out advice to Jeets. Below is just a sampling.

David Remnick (The New Yorker): “Since Derek Jeter has nothing but success in life, I gleefully anticipate his reaction when his first writer begins, ‘I just want to thank the fans.…’ Good luck, Derek! Hire real writers and pay them well.”

Cindi Leive (Glamour): “Work hard, sweat the details and remember: Drama counts!”

David Granger (Esquire): “It’s the guys who don’t get all that much playing time who most often have the valuable perspective and the funniest stories to offer. Don’t be afraid to let some of these guys contribute anonymously, as long as the professionals (like the incredible Gary Hoenig who you’ve already hired) make the effort to vet their contentions. This could be a good thing, as long as you push your contributors to tell both pleasant and unpleasant truths. Make it funny, make it real and you could have something here.”

The New Yorker to Launch New Paywall

Beginning July 21, The New Yorker’s content — dating back to 2007 — will be available for all to read online. We suggest you take advantage of this, because in three months, the glossy is closing everything back up; sealed behind a new, metered paywall.

The New York Times reports that the motivation behind opening up newyorker.com was to find out how readers interacted with the site, and then use that data to construct the revamped paywall. The magazine also hopes to add subscribers via the promotion.

We’re excited about this idea, because in the past, it was almost pointless to go to The New Yorker’s site unless you were a subscriber. You never really knew which articles would be available to non-subscribers, and the selection was always minimal.

David Remnick, the magazine’s editor, admitted as much. He told the Times that their method for selecting magazine content that was available online was “awkward” and had “long since outlived its conception.”

Roger Angell Chats with M Magazine

Nice interview feature from Sridhar Pappu for the summer issue of men’s luxury quarterly M.

RogerAngellPicHe caught up with 93-year-old New Yorker editor and writer Roger Angell to talk reader response to February 2014 piece “This Old Man,” Angell’s imminent receipt of the J. G. Taylor Spink Award and this man’s august New Yorker genealogy:

The magazine is more or less a part of him: He knew it well even as a child, given that his mother, Katharine White, was its literary editor from its founding year of 1925 to 1960, and his stepfather, renowned essayist and Charlotte’s Web author E. B. White, joined its staff in 1927 and stayed on as a contributor into the early eighties.

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David Remnick is Syracuse University’s 160th Commencement Speaker

Over the years, a number of top-rank journalists have delivered the keynote at Syracuse University’s commencement. This group includes “First Lady of American Journalism” Dorothy Thompson Lewis (1937), Walter Cronkite (1968), Dan Rather (1984), Steve Kroft (1996) and Ted Koppel (2000).

On May 11 in the Carrier Dome, New Yorker EIC David Remnick will add his name to this list and receive as well an honorary degree. From the university announcement:

“As an author and journalist, David is one of the most insightful chroniclers of world events and the people who shape them,” says SU Chancellor and President Kent Syverud. “He excels at recognizing a great story and knowing how to tell it well, whether the subject is the fall of the Soviet Empire or the rise of Barack Obama.”

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If This is Wednesday, It Must Be New Yorker Cartoons Pitch Day

A highlight of last night’s 60 Minutes profile of New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff is the portion where Morley Safer sits in on the weekly Wednesday illustrator pitches.

NewYorkerTarzanCartoon

One of the drawings submitted on this particular day hinged on, as is so often the case, a very clever cultural observation:

Mankoff: The apes are saying [to Tarzan]: “We found you and raised you as one of us. So we were just wondering at what point did you learn to shave?”

Artist Joe Dator: Can I say I have researched this? There is no iteration of Tarzan in literature, comic books or the movies in which he has facial hair. It makes no sense.

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UK’s Port Magazine Adds U.S. Editor

The two things that jumped off the page when reading Alex Vadukul‘s bio are the fact that he was born in Milan and idolizes Gay Talese. Solid lineage, on both fronts.

PortMagazine_Issue12The New York-based Vadukul, who has in recent years been a regular contributor to the New York Times, and also written for the paper’s style magazine T and Rolling Stone, this week added the title of U.S. editor for London-based arts and culture quarterly Port. The publication was co-founded in 2011 by Matt Willey, who serves as senior editor and boasts an equally intriguing background:

Willey is on the board of the Editorial Design Organization and is the vice chairman of The Typographic Circle. He is a visiting lecturer at Skolen For Visuel Kommunikation in Denmark.

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David Remnick Joins NBC’s Olympic Coverage

NBC just made its Olympics coverage more interesting. David Remnick, editor-in-chief of The New Yorker, is joining the network’s 2014 Olympic Winter Games team. He’ll contribute during the Opening Ceremony and throughout the games.

“David is a distinguished journalist who knows Russia very well and we’re excited to have his expertise on the host country for our Sochi coverage,” said Jim Bell, Executive Producer of NBC Olympics, in a statement.

Remnick has been with The New Yorker since 1992. He has been editor since 1998.

Changes Come to The New Yorker

From now on, The New Yorker is going to look just a little bit different. According to The New York Times, the magazine is revamping its table of contents and its fiction, Goings On About Town and Briefly Noted sections. In the video above, Wyatt Mitchell, The New Yorker’s creative director, discusses the new design.

If you have an eagle eye, you might notice the following updates:

The changes include a cleaner presentation of the table of contents and contributor pages. The most notable change may be on the ‘Goings On About Town’ pages, which start with a more distinctive presentation of the section’s opening image and include less detail on museum and show listings. The revised pages also highlight the work of the magazine’s critics.

David Remnick, The New Yorker’s editor-in-chief, is prepared for the inevitable complaints. He told the Times that if readers don’t appreciate the new look, “That’s O.K. Things settle down. Our bread and butter is the language and the reporting and the stories that we publish.”

Please feel free to complain about his reaction to complaints.

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