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Posts Tagged ‘Gerard Baker’

WSJ Cuts Awards Coordinator

wall_street_journal_logo_01The Wall Street Journal has cut its awards coordinator Debbie Luczak Hoffman. Hoffman — whose role was to nominate the Journal for various honors, including the Pulitzers — had been with the paper since 1992.

As Jim Romenesko notes, Gerard Baker, the Journal’s editor, recently told Der Spiegel that winning Pulitzers wasn’t important. “I don’t judge the success of the Journal by the number of Pulitzer prizes,” said Baker. “It doesn’t say anything about the quality of our journalism.”

One wonders if Baker still feels that way.

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WSJ to Celebrate 125th Anniversary

Tomorrow, The Wall Street Journal turns 125. On July 8, 1889, a few fellas named Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser launched the paper as a four-page newsletter that cost two cents an issue. The goal, according to the trio, was to “aim steadily at being a paper of news, and not a paper of opinions. It will give a good deal of news not found in other publications, and it will present in the market article, its news, its tables and its advertisements, a faithful picture of the rapidly evolving panorama of the Street.”

To celebrate making it 125 years and still retaining a full head of hair, the Journal will publish a special edition of the paper tomorrow along with several unique online features.

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WSJ Launches Native Advertising

wsjSponsored content, native advertising, ads that are annoyingly similar to editorial content — whatever you want to call them, they’re coming to The Wall Street Journal. Welcome to the party.

The paper has announced that WSJ Custom Studios will create the ads labeled as “Sponsor Generated Content,” and they’ll be embedded among other editorial content. The first native ads, from Brocade, will debut tomorrow. Each ad will be created by staffers hired specifically for WSJ Custom Studios. No Journal staffer will be involved in the ads.

The move isn’t surprising. More media companies are participating in native advertising every day. The New York Times said it was getting into the game last December. The problem with the sponsored ads is that some people view them as deceptive; that they’re designed to intentionally confuse the reader. Gerard Baker, editor of the Journal, doesn’t think that will be an issue.

“Our readers trust us, and the WSJ Custom Studios team has created clear and thorough labeling guidelines around the advertiser’s content in order to protect that trust,” he explained, in a statement. “I am confident that our readers will appreciate what is sponsor-generated content and what is content from our global news staff.”

WSJ Launches ‘The 10-Point’ Daily Email Service

Gerard Baker, editor-in-chief of The Wall Street Journal, wants to make things easier on you. That’s at least one of the goals of “The 10-Point,” a daily email Journal readers can subscribe to that — according to Baker — curates the paper’s “best scoops and stories, as well as some of the offbeat content we produce to lighten your day a little.”

The 10-Point gets its name from the size of the typeface used on the lead column in the Journal’s iconic “What’s News” section. True to that number, the email has 10 sections.

We’re all for making our lives easier, so we’re thinking The 10-Point will come in handy. Click here to sign up.

Gerard Baker Does Not Like Native Advertising

Gerard Baker GGerard Baker, editor-in-chief of Dow Jones and The Wall Street Journal’s managing editor, is not a fan of native advertising. Capital New York reports that during an Advertising Week discussion, Baker repeatedly slammed the ad units.

At one point, Baker even compared companies using native advertising to Faust, the legendary character who traded his soul to the devil in exchange for unlimited intelligence and other pleasures. Yes, it gets that deep at Advertising Week.

Baker said that sponsored content or native ads blur the line between editorial and ads — a common complaint — and added that in the end, it’s a lose/lose situation:

An advertiser wants to advertise in The Wall Street Journal to be seen and to be associated with a brand like The Wall Street Journal, or The Financial Times or Bloomberg, because those news organizations are respected. If [advertisers] manipulate the digital or print operations of those news organizations, it makes the reader confused as to what is news and what is advertising, and the reader’s trust, the very reason that those advertisers want to advertise in those news organizations, goes away.

Glenn Hall Named Editor of Marketwatch

Glenn Hall has been named the new editor of Marketwatch. Hall comes to the business and finance site from The Blaze, where he had served as managing editor since last summer.

Hall had previously served as editor-in-chief of TheStreet.com. He also ran Bloomberg News’ political desk in Washington for a decade.

“Glenn is exceptionally well prepared to lead Marketwatch,” said Gerard Baker, editor-in-chief of Dow Jones and WSJ’s managing editor, in a statement. “He’s a wintered business and finance journalist who knows markets through and through, and he’s worked almost his entire career in electronic or web journalism.”

Hall reports to Almar Latour, executive editor of Dow Jones and WSJ.

It’s Official: AllThingsD and Dow Jones Part Ways

It’s official: AllThingsD and Dow Jones are done. According to a statement just released by Gerard Baker, editor of Dow Jones and managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, AllThingsD and Dow Jones will not sign a contract extension. In the memo, the move is billed as “a mutual separation.”

We first heard rumblings that Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg — the founders of AllThingsD — were trying to find investors that might be interested in buying a stake in the site late last month. To that end, Fortune is reporting that there are talks underway with Comcast and NBC Universal.

The separation of AllThingsD and Dow Jones also means the end of Mossberg’s tenure at The Wall Street Journal. He had been with the paper since 1970.

Read Baker’s full memo below.

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WSJ Shrinks Iconic ‘What’s News’ Feature

The Wall Street Journal must be taking bikini season seriously, because it just shrunk its iconic “What’s News” feature. Today’s What’s News sidebar is a single column, instead of the customary two.

The What’s News section has been a Journal A1 staple for many years. It packs snippets of the day’s articles, along with items not found in the paper that specific day. The content was separated into Business & Finance and World-Wide. Now only Business & Finance remains.

In a memo announcing the move, Gerard Baker, the Journal’s managing editor, said What’s News was changing for a few reasons.

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WSJ Merges Six Deals Blogs Into MoneyBeat

 The Wall Street Journal launched yet another blog channel on Monday as the paper rounds out the digital offerings that augment its subscription site.

MoneyBeat combines six of the Journal‘s existing blogs — including MarketBeat, The Source, Overheard and all the global Deal Journals –into one hub dedicated to global finance, markets and mergers and acquisitions.

“MoneyBeat is a one-stop shop for everybody interested in finance and markets, no matter where they are around the world,” Gerard Baker, the paper’s managing editor, said in a statement. “With its vast network of journalists and editors, the Journal is uniquely positioned to deliver lively, round-the-clock news and analysis from the U.S., Asia and Europe.”

The site comes as the Journal diversifies its blog offerings, with the launch last November of The Accelerators and Startup Journal, both focused on entrepreneurialism.

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Dow Jones Makes Two Changes

Dow Jones has made two changes to its Europe coverage. First up, Thorold Barker has been named editor, Europe, Middle East and Africa for Dow Jones Newswires and The Wall Street Journal. In this new role, Barker will be responsible for news output in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. He will be covering the print, digital and local language sites of The Wall Street Journal, Dow Jones Newswires and Financial News.

Additionally, Gren Manuel has been named executive editor for Dow Jones and The Wall Street Journal. He will be tasked with integrating and then overseeing the operations of the newsrooms in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Manuel will report to Barker.

“As we continue to build an integrated newsroom tasked to pursue our global ambitions, an expanded role in Europe ranks among our highest priorities,” said Gerard Baker, managing editor of the Journal and editor-in-chief of Dow Jones, in a statement. “Given the size of our presence in the region, it represents a tremendous opportunity for us to refine and grow our peerless range of news products and take them to an even wider audience.”

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