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Posts Tagged ‘how to write for magazines’

Earn $2 A Word At This Women’s Lifestyle Pub

RealSimpleReal Simple bills itself as the go-to mag for the busy woman looking for solutions to simplify her life. The pub’s scope is broad, covering everything from food and health issues to parenting, beauty, decor and more.

The mag is 60 percent freelance written and also has a thriving online presence. So what’s the best way to get your foot in the door at this popular service pub?

 Though most of Real Simple is pitchable, the FOB is particularly freelancer friendly. Naturally, deputy editor Noelle Howey advises new freelancers to start there. For “Health,” editors are looking for a wide range of topics: Nutrition, fitness, hygiene, metabolism, weight loss, skincare and more are all covered here and, if you can weave a pitch that tackles multiple health-related subjects at once, even better. “Family” is another good place for freelancers to break in, and editors are looking for pieces about how to manage family and relationship dynamics.

For more information on how to get published in this mag, including editors contact info, read: How To Pitch: Real Simple.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Earn $1 A Word At Cosmopolitan for Latinas

CosmopolitanLatinasCosmopolitan for Latinas is a relatively new mag, but it has the advantage of a built-in audience that is already familiar with the Cosmopolitan brand. The twist is that this glossy is dedicated to all things Latina.

As managing editor Jessica Rodriguez says: “[We want] to be able to talk to [Latinas] about fashion and beauty and all of the issues and particular nuances about their bi-cultural lives.” The pub is in need of writers for their lifestyle, health and entertaining features, among others:

Editors at the mag assign out to freelancers, but there are a few sections of the book that are particularly friendly to pitches, too. “Real Talk,” a lifestyle section that weighs in on different issues, is one of them. Anything with a unique angle will catch the editors’ eyes here, and a good example is a piece called “I Won’t Date a Latin Guy.”

To learn more about how to get published in this mag, including the editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Cosmopolitan for Latinas.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn Up to $2 A Word At The Freelance-Driven Discover

Discover

Discover magazine is going through a bit of a makeover. The pub recently relocated their headquarters from New York City to Milwaukee and they’ve added a new editorial team. This science-driven monthly even has a revised mission statement: “To provide content that informs, inspires and entertains people who love science.”

Discover is 95 percent freelance written, and they need writers on all platforms. Editors are looking for strong multimedia content for their website, and if you’re into long-form writing, they also have a series of digital eBook singles. The pub’s editor-in-chief, Stephen C. George, says that the freelance field is wide open:

“Freelancers are our lifeblood,” George said, referring to the substantial amount of content that is freelance driven. When it comes to pitching, “We’re hungry for pitches from established science writers as well as those just starting in the field,” he said. Of immediate need are features on technology, physics, chemistry and other hard sciences. Archaeology writers, take note: “If there’s a great archaeology story out there — which I’m desperate for — I’d take it for [the] March/April 2014 [issue]!” said George.

For editors’ contact info and more tips on how to get published in this mag, read: How To Pitch: Discover.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

News-Driven Stories Land $1.50 A Word At Outside

Outside

Outside is looking for writers with a sense of adventure. The monthly mag features articles on pop culture, news, science, tech, fitness and more. Although one might assume the audience is primarily snowboarding dudes from Aspen, Colo., that’s not entirely the case.

Yes, the mag’s audience is predominately male, but many readers are city dwellers longing for an escape. The pub is 70 percent freelance written, and their newly redesigned website is on the hunt for writers keen on fast-breaking news.

The mag’s senior editor Abe Streep tells what kind of stories make it in the mag:

“A pitch on the best hikes in the National Parks probably won’t get you far,” said Streep. But travel news that leads to actionable service — say, a story on how the Grand Canyon’s new permitting system for rafters affects readers — is very welcome. News that leads to service is the ideal: new lodges, new technology, new training tools. The magazine is focusing more and more on its core mission: inspiring adventure. “We’re still looking for pop-culture stories,” said Streep, “but only those that are a natural fit for Outside.”

For editors’ contact info and more, read: How To Pitch: Outside.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Compelling Narratives Land $1 A Word at Hemispheres

Hemispheres

United Airlines’ Hemispheres doesn’t like to think of itself as just another airline mag. For one thing, it reaches more than 12 million fliers a month, and has attracted big name writers like The New York TimesDavid Carr and Esquire‘s Tom Chiarella.

The pub’s content is 80 percent freelance, and they are always looking for new writers with strong ideas:

“I think of us as a general-interest magazine, as opposed to something that’s more strictly in the travel category,” said Jordan Heller, Hemispheres‘ new editor-in-chief. Yes, the mag’s signature “Three Perfect Days” feature is still there, which highlights the ideal weekend travel itinerary in destinations across the globe, but in keeping with the vision of the EICs who came before him, Heller leans toward the kind of informative, well-reported, non-niche journalism one might find in Vanity Fair or Men’s Journal.

To hear more tips and editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Hemispheres.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

XoJane.com is Looking For Intimate Stories

xoJane

XoJane.com, the brainchild of Jane Pratt (of the lauded 90s mags Sassy and Jane) is an uber-successful women’s website with 2 million monthly uniques. The site focuses on personal essays, which cover a plethora of (often controversial) topics, including: gender issues, weight struggles, addiction, birth control, dating, pregnancy, food, fashion, pop culture and the list goes on…

The site’s success can be attributed to its authentic writing, and it certainly helps that there are zero stock photos used (writers must submit their own personal photos with each article they write). The pub’s content is 75 percent freelance, so it’s an ideal place for any scribe with a strong voice or opinion to get their foot in the door. Executive editor Emily McCombs explains what kind of writer they’re looking for:

Writers who are open to sharing their intimate stories will find xoJane.com to be ideal and edgier than other women’s sites. “I think our site is a lot more personal. Almost everything is [written in the] first person,” McCombs says. “Our [goal] is not aggregating or responding to what’s going on in the Internet. It’s mostly original content. We can get pretty outlandish. We’re not afraid to try something that might a little bit weird or a little bit crazy.”

To hear more tips on how to get published on xoJane.com, read How To Pitch: xoJane.com

Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Land $2 a Word for Innovative Articles at AARP

AARP The Magazine, one of the most successful magazines for the over 50 set, is looking for freelancers who have something meaningful to say. And despite their older clientele, the magazine is not only published in print, but also on tablets and online.

AARP has an enormous readership (its circulation is 22 million, yet it reaches an astounding 34 million people). Even better news: 60 percent of their content comes from freelance writers. Marilyn Milloy, deputy editor, explains the magazine’s mission:

Our greater mission is to redefine aging in America by showing that attitude, aspiration and actions are more relevant to quality of life than how old you are,” she said. “We don’t have direct competitors, but magazines in our competitive set would include Reader’s Digest, More, Prevention and Money. We overlap with all of them. But we’re unique because of our size and our laser focus on people over 50. These are the people who most matter to us, so we show their images and offer content based on where they are in their lives — whether it’s advising how to get the most from their healthcare dollars, their work, their travel or their grocery shopping.

For editors contact info and pitching etiquette, read How To Pitch: AARP The Magazine.

Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Land a Byline in the Fourth Most Circulated Magazine

For almost a century, Better Homes and Gardens has been offering actionable advice on everything from decorating and gardening to personal and family well-being. No sections are off-limits to freelancers in the book, and landing a byline means your work is sent to its 7.6 million-plus subscribers. Not only is it a chance to get many eyeballs for your writing – the pub also pays its freelancers up to $2 a word.

While editors at the mag regularly come up with ideas in house and assign them to writers who they regularly work with, “I really am always hungry for story pitches,” said senior deputy home editor Kelly Kegans. “The better pitches that we end up running with, by and large, come from outside.” All sections of the book are open to freelance pitches, and unlike many other mags, editors don’t discourage newbies from pitching the feature well. “It just depends on the strength of their story idea, more than anything,” she said.

For editors contact info and more, read How To Pitch: Better Homes and Gardens.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Food Network Magazine Wants Food-Culture Obsessed Writers

Food Network Magazine

As many New Yorkers would agree, the plethora of delectable food ranks high on the list of reasons to love NYC. We’re often at the heart of explosive food trends (anyone else sick of hearing about the cronut?), which comes in handy if you’re a food culture-obsessed writer looking for offbeat stories to pitch.

Food Network Magazine, the best-selling food magazine on the newsstand, publishes more than 100 recipes in every issue and covers everything from gear, cookbooks, health, food science, food styling, entertaining, kitchens, travel, shopping and restaurants.

While the broad coverage may lend itself to more byline opportunities, writers still need to hit the nail on the head when pitching to the pub.

To find out what Food Network Magazine editors are looking for in a pitch, read How to Pitch: Food Network Magazine.

Sherry Yuan

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Lessons in Freelancing: What to Do When You’re Stiffed on Payment

Small Claims Court

Ever had to wrangle a paycheck from a publication, or worry that hounding them for your money will make you seem “difficult”?

What can you do when a publisher fails to pay for work that you’ve already done? Is it worth it to take the magazine to small claims court? In the latest Mediabistro feature, one writer shares her story of being stiffed on payment for over a year:

I was writing almost monthly, sometimes for multiple departments in one issue because [my editor] passed my name on to other editors. I covered news, spirituality and relationships, sometimes pitching, sometimes taking assignments. And, during the course of all these interactions, I built friendly working relationships.

There was no indication in those initial months, then years, that I would eventually be plotting to Spiderman crawl up the walls of their corporate office building just to get my money.

For the rest of her story, read: Lessons in Freelancing: What to Do When Stiffed on Payment.

Sherry Yuan

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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