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Posts Tagged ‘layoffs’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Bartiromo Joins FBN | Bloomberg Layoffs | Don Lemon Promoted

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Maria Bartiromo Leaving CNBC for FBN (TVNewser)
Maria Bartiromo is leaving CNBC to join Fox Business. “After 20 years of groundbreaking work at CNBC, Maria Bartiromo will be leaving the company as her contract expires on Nov. 24,” a CNBC spokesperson tells TVNewser. “Her contributions to CNBC are too numerous to list but we thank her for all of her hard work over the years and wish her the best.” Capital New York Bartiromo was one of CNBC’s first breakout stars, becoming a fixture in the financial news world and garnering the nickname “Money Honey” along the way. She marked her 20th anniversary at the channel last month. NYT Bartiromo is expected to work on a program about the day’s developments on Wall Street. Her new deal is also expected to include exposure on the far-more-watched Fox News. The signing is a coup of sorts for Fox Business, which has struggled to establish a profile. Last week, Fox Business averaged fewer than 10,000 viewers in the group that attracts advertisers, those between the ages of 25 and 54. CNBC had more than three times as many with 31,000. Reuters Bartiromo has won two Emmy awards and written several books as well as columns for magazines and newspapers, including USA Today. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media In a statement to Politico, Bartiromo said she was “incredibly proud” of what the CNBC had accomplished over the last two decades. “I want to thank all the people at CNBC who have been with me on this journey, and of course the viewers and investors everywhere for making me love every minute of it,” she said.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Alec Baldwin Suspended | Jay Rosen Joins NewCo | Doris Lessing Dead at 94

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MSNBC Suspends Alec Baldwin’s Up Late for Two Weeks (TVNewser)
MSNBC has suspended Alec Baldwin after he called a photographer a “c**ksucking f*g.” His outburst has been criticized as homophobic and anti-gay. In a statement posted on MSNBC.com, Baldwin apologized for his remarks. NYT He wrote: “I did not intend to hurt or offend anyone with my choice of words, but clearly I have — and for that I am deeply sorry. Words are important. I understand that, and will choose mine with great care going forward. What I said and did this week, as I was trying to protect my family, was offensive and unacceptable. Behavior like this undermines hard-fought rights that I vigorously support.” Capital New York Up Late has only been on the channel for a month, so a two-week hiatus is significant. The former 30 Rock actor has a history of public outbursts, but said before his MSNBC program began that the channel knew what it was getting into when it hired him. HuffPost Baldwin: “Whether the show comes back at all is at issue right now. My producers and I had a very enlightening and well-researched program prepared to air on Nov. 22 itself, dealing with John Kennedy’s assassination. That show is off the air now. I am deeply apologetic to Ron Fried, who worked extremely hard with me on that show.” TheWrap Baldwin came under fire from CNN newsman Anderson Cooper, who accused Baldwin of making “ridiculous” excuses. “Wow, Alec Baldwin shows his true colors yet again,” Cooper wrote Friday. “How is he going to lie and excuse his anti-gay slurs this time?” TVSpy Robert Moses, reporter for New York Fox-owned station WNYW was confronted and threatened by Baldwin Friday morning. TVSpy Hours after confronting Moses, Baldwin continued his terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day, this time accusing WNYW reporter Linda Schmidt of hitting his wife in the face with a mic.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Chron Cuts Food Section? | Snapchat Rejected $3B | Six Out at Time Out NY

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Stand-Alone Food Section Faces Demise in Bay Area (NYT)
In the food-obsessed Bay Area, the San Francisco Chronicle’s food section has been as much of a city institution as the cable car, and to many San Franciscans, more useful. Over the years it has won many awards and developed a dedicated following. Now, the Chronicle, owned by the Hearst Corporation, is planning to eliminate its stand-alone food section and integrate it into a single lifestyle section — tentatively titled “Artisan” — with material from other parts of the newspaper, including the home section, according to employees who have been told of the plans. The publisher of the Chronicle, Jeffrey Johnson, did not return calls seeking comment. However, the managing editor, Audrey Cooper, posted a response online saying that the Chronicle was actually increasing its investment in food and wine coverage. San Francisco Chronicle It’s impossible to separate food, restaurants and the culture of farm-to-table living from the San Francisco experience. For decades, these issues have formed a pillar of the San Francisco Chronicle‘s news coverage. It’s a Chronicle tradition and, most importantly, good journalism. We wouldn’t be San Francisco without it. That’s why the newsroom has been studying several ways to build on the foundation created by our award-winning staff. We’re disappointed by recent inaccurate reports in The New York Times, which has attempted to compete with us in this arena. SF Station A bi-coastal food fight is brewing between the San Francisco Chronicle and The New York Times after the Times published a report with anonymous sources that claims the Chronicle will merge its standalone food section with other sections in the paper. It’s another sign of the newspaper industry’s slow, painful death — or could it be a power play by the Times, looking to gain leverage in the San Francisco market? NY Observer Although the Hearst Corporation-owned newspaper has downsized in recent years, the food section, a Bay Area institution, has been spared the ravages of the media industry. Not only was the food and wine section located in a separate building with a test kitchen and an “extensive wine cellar,” but the newspaper had a garden and honey-producing bees on the rooftop that were used in the test recipes. But during a meeting this month, Chronicle president Joanne Bradford said that the section was just not “sustainable.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: HLN Axes Three Shows | Lopez Tweets Crisis | Outrage Over NBC Footage

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HLN Hit With Show Cancellations, Layoffs as Part of Brand Repositioning (TheWrap)
HLN has cancelled three shows as it prepares to unveil its new schedule and “re-position the brand,” the network announced on Monday. In the first major change in new channel head Albie Hecht’s reign, a memo obtained by TheWrap said an unspecified number of staffers will be laid off: “While change is necessary to evolve HLN, it is also difficult,” Hecht wrote. “A handful of our family members will be impacted by today’s news.” Those family members are the staffs of Raising America, Now in America and Evening Express, which have been cancelled. Capital New York An unspecified number of staffers for the channel in New York and its Atlanta headquarters are affected by the moves. “These changes serve as a principal step as we continue to re-position the brand,” Hecht wrote in an email to HLN staff obtained by Capital New York. TVNewser Beginning Nov. 18, the shows will be replaced by a four-hour block of News Now from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. ET, anchored by a rotation of Mike Galanos, Susan Hendricks, Christi Paul and Lynn Berry. Variety In the past, the network has moved from offering a digest of the day’s news under the name CNN Headline News to featuring personality-driven programming as well as intense coverage of buzzy legal cases winding through the courts.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Reuters to Cut 3,000 Jobs | NY Post Goes to Trial | NYT Ad Woes

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Thomson Reuters Beats Wall Street’s Expectations, Plans to Cut 3,000 Positions (JimRomenesko.com)
Thomson Reuters on Tuesday reported a third-quarter profit of 48 cents per share, beating Wall Street expectations by 4 cents. “Our Financial business achieved positive net sales for the first time in more than two years,” CEO Jim Smith tells employees. He adds in his memo: “We will eliminate approximately 3,000 positions as we continue to reduce product and operational complexity across our company.” WSJ The cuts, equivalent to about 5 percent of Thomson Reuters’ workforce of about 60,000, were disclosed on the same day that the financial data and news firm reported a 38 percent drop in third-quarter earnings, due to weaker revenue. The Guardian The news and information company said most of the jobs would be lost from its financial and risk arm, which sells data terminals and other services to investment banks and brokers. The losses are on top of 1,000 cuts announced earlier this year. Including staff leaving and sales of businesses the company’s workforce will shrink by 5,500, or 9 percent, from the start of the year. The Globe & Mail “I think everybody in the world is trying to do more with less,” Smith said. “I don’t think the pressure on costs and keeping them under control is going to lessen. That said, what I hope is this strategy gives us a more predictable path in the future.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Condé Ditches Interns | SpinMedia Cuts Staff | Layoffs at HuffPost

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Condé Nast Discontinuing Internship Program (WWD / Memo Pad) Condé Nast has decided to discontinue its internship program starting in 2014, WWD has learned. The end of the program comes after the publisher was sued this summer by two former interns who claimed they were paid below the minimum wage during internships at W and The New Yorker. The Guardian The pair suing Condé Nast claim the law was breached because the publisher was gaining an advantage from their labor. Lauren Ballinger, who worked at W magazine in 2009, compared her work there unfavorably with Anne Hathaway’s experience in the film The Devil Wears Prada, after she spent days packing accessories for editors. The other, Matthew Leib, said he was paid between $300 and $500 for the two summers he worked for the New Yorker‘s cartoon archives. FishbowlNY Condé isn’t the only media company brought to court over failing to pay interns. Gawker, Fox Searchlight and Hearst have all been sued for the same reason. The difference is that Condé has now taken the bold step of eliminating the issue completely. If you have no interns, there’s no way to get sued for not paying them. Gawker The media class comprises thousands of former unpaid interns, so you’re going to hear a lot about how their internships were so valuable, so demanding yet fulfilling — look at them now! — that they just can’t believe Condé would do such a thing. Gosh, kill their internship program! You’d think the company, and maybe the entire media industry, was closing down for good. BuzzFeed / Politics While the end of Condé Nast’s sought-after internship program might irk some job-seekers looking for a way into the media’s biggest names, advocates fighting to get interns paid say the elimination of internships at the company signals that there will be better opportunities for job seekers down the road.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Inquirer Editor Sacked | Fox Newsroom Revamped | Shainin to New Yorker


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Top Editor at The Philadelphia Inquirer Is Dismissed (NYT)
In the latest example of management turmoil at The Philadelphia Inquirer, William K. Marimow was fired as the paper’s top editor on Monday. The news was announced in a brief email sent to staff members in the morning by the newspaper’s publisher, Robert J. Hall. Poynter / MediaWire Marimow and publisher Bob Hall had a “difference in philosophical vision in the direction of the paper,” a source says. The newsroom was scheduled to learn of Marimow’s departure Monday afternoon, the source said. There’s no timetable yet for his departure. JimRomenesko.com “Total surprise,” I’m told. “He was at the 10:30 morning news meeting, so it had to be sudden as the wording of the email indicates. Word has it all the owners were not consulted and that Marimow has told some folks ‘it’s not over yet.’” NewsWorks Newspaper sources told me that Hall recently instructed Marimow to fire at least two veteran staff members at the newspaper, and that he refused on principle, precipitating his own dismissal. He said the decision to oust Marimow came after weeks of talks about the nature and pace of changes needed at the newspaper. He said the changes were based on “reader research” but that he wouldn’t get into specifics, in part for competitive reasons. Philadelphia Magazine Marimow was fired after many months of infighting with Hall, according to internal documents anonymously delivered Monday afternoon to Philadelphia magazine. “Marimow is not and never will be the change agent that we need at the Inquirer to turn around the circulation decline and grow our company,” writes Hall, in summation.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Reuters Cutting Staff | Tom Clancy Dead at 66 | Ronan Going to MSNBC?


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Reuters Will Cut Around 5 Percent Across Editorial (NY Observer)
Stephen Adler, the president and editor-in-chief of Reuters, announced during a staff conference call Wednesday morning that the news service will be cutting around 5 percent across the board in editorial. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The announcement comes in the wake of weeks of high-level staff departures from the organization and the announcement the company was canning its ambitious new digital product Reuters Next. Despite cancelling Next, Adler told staff improving the current website is still a priority. FishbowlNY Adler said that staffers (and some managers) were being notified as soon as possible, and the reductions would impact Reuters offices across the world. TheWrap “To simplify and strengthen the Reuters news operation, we are making changes that will result in a slightly smaller editorial staff,” said spokeswoman Barb Burg. “One that is more strategically positioned and better equipped to help Reuters report and deliver the news that matters most to our customers and society as a whole.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Daily Beast Loses 20 | George Will to Fox News | WaPo Sale Official


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Daily Beast’s John Avlon Rallies Troops as Roughly 20 Colleagues Lose Their Jobs (Capital New York)
On the first day of its new life without Newsweek, Daily Beast executive editor John Avlon rallied the troops with an afternoon memo full of good news, like a 36-percent year-over-year traffic gain and a nomination to Adweek‘s annual “Hot List” poll. Roughly 20 employees across the editorial and business sides were let go Monday and Tuesday, a person with knowledge of the cuts told Capital. The layoffs were a direct result of Newsweek’s sale to IBT Media, which recently took the struggling title off parent company IAC’s hands for an undisclosed sum. Gawker Capital’s Joe Pompeo says that leaves TDB with a total headcount of about 65 employees. If you are one of them, you might consider browsing job listings when your workday has concluded. Though there are exceptions to every rule, the outlook at media companies that find themselves in this position typically does not brighten from here on out. NY Mag / Daily Intelligencer In an optimistic memo, the site’s executive editor reminded those remaining “that The Daily Beast is nominated for hottest news site by Adweek — so if you didn’t vote yet, please do.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Traveler Lays Off 17 | NJ Paper Avoids Shutdown | Tribune Co. to Cut $100M


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Traveler Layoffs Reach 17 as Condé Nast Title Adopts A Softer Focus (Capital New York)
Fourteen Condé Nast Traveler employees were laid off Wednesday, bringing the total number of staffers cut under new editor-in-chief Pilar Guzmán to 17, a source familiar with the matter told Capital. NY Post Guzmán is said to have handed walking papers to executive editor Kevin Doyle and senior editors Alison Humes and Dinda Elliott, the daughter of the late famed Newsweek editor Osborne Elliot. Guzmán, raided from Martha Stewart Living, where she was the editor-in-chief, started shaking things up within days of her arrival at Condé. WWD / Memo Pad Since its inception, Traveler’s commitment to serious travel journalism was embodied in the logo coined by founding editor Harry Evans, “Truth in Travel.” The layoffs suggest that credo may too be discarded, or at least, take on a whole new meaning. FishbowlNY Dropping Doyle, Humes and Elliott might help Guzmán shape Traveler to her liking, but anyone who has been following Condé drama lately knows that these moves must’ve been approved by Anna Wintour. Wintour has been overseeing more cuts than a Jo-Ann Fabric scrapbooking class. Bloomberg “This is part of a broader restructuring effort that will shift the focus on more of a lifestyle lens and the growing digital business,” said Sarina Sanandaji, a spokeswoman for the magazine. The magazine is likely to replace some of the positions, she said.

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