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Posts Tagged ‘magazine editors’

Earn $1 a Word at Sports Illustrated For Kids

SIKidsSports Illustrated For Kids is all about the joy of being a sports fan. The pub’s target demographic are boys aged 7-14, with a love of sports and a will to read.

While a majority of the content is written by in-house staffers, editors are always willing to hear new ideas from freelancers. Local stories are in demand, as are articles focusing on a niche industry. There are a few key sections of the pub which are particularly freelance friendly:

The best place for freelancers to pitch is the feature well. “We’re looking for great ideas, interesting takes that would manifest as packages or features or profiles,” says managing editor Bob Der. Features run about 1,000 words, and packages with multiple components (say, a series of features with sidebars) can run from 2,000 to 4,000 words. Packages could be thematic, such as “athletes who give back” or “environmental conservation as it relates to sports.”

For editors’ contact info and more pitching tips, read: How To Pitch: Sports Illustrated For Kids.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Earn $2 A Word At This Women’s Lifestyle Pub

RealSimpleReal Simple bills itself as the go-to mag for the busy woman looking for solutions to simplify her life. The pub’s scope is broad, covering everything from food and health issues to parenting, beauty, decor and more.

The mag is 60 percent freelance written and also has a thriving online presence. So what’s the best way to get your foot in the door at this popular service pub?

 Though most of Real Simple is pitchable, the FOB is particularly freelancer friendly. Naturally, deputy editor Noelle Howey advises new freelancers to start there. For “Health,” editors are looking for a wide range of topics: Nutrition, fitness, hygiene, metabolism, weight loss, skincare and more are all covered here and, if you can weave a pitch that tackles multiple health-related subjects at once, even better. “Family” is another good place for freelancers to break in, and editors are looking for pieces about how to manage family and relationship dynamics.

For more information on how to get published in this mag, including editors contact info, read: How To Pitch: Real Simple.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $1 A Word At Cosmopolitan for Latinas

CosmopolitanLatinasCosmopolitan for Latinas is a relatively new mag, but it has the advantage of a built-in audience that is already familiar with the Cosmopolitan brand. The twist is that this glossy is dedicated to all things Latina.

As managing editor Jessica Rodriguez says: “[We want] to be able to talk to [Latinas] about fashion and beauty and all of the issues and particular nuances about their bi-cultural lives.” The pub is in need of writers for their lifestyle, health and entertaining features, among others:

Editors at the mag assign out to freelancers, but there are a few sections of the book that are particularly friendly to pitches, too. “Real Talk,” a lifestyle section that weighs in on different issues, is one of them. Anything with a unique angle will catch the editors’ eyes here, and a good example is a piece called “I Won’t Date a Latin Guy.”

To learn more about how to get published in this mag, including the editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Cosmopolitan for Latinas.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn $1 A Word and Up at This Foodie Pub

EatingWell

EatingWell strives to be the place ‘where good taste meets good health.’ This food-centric pub is all about healthy recipes, nutrition news and interesting narratives on the origins of our food.

The mag is looking for investigative pieces on nutrition and science-based articles on subjects like food sustainability. New writers who manage to break into the book often establish fruitful relationships with editors there:

Features need to be well researched and thorough; a news angle or a hook to a trend also helps. “Nourish” is an essay column about how food nourishes us in unexpected ways. It is open to top literary talent as well as new writers. Travel stories are welcomed only if they have a clear tie-in to health and come with easy recipes that meet the EatingWell nutrition guidelines. What the editors prefer are pitches in which the writer can show a personal connection to a particular locale and its cuisine.

For editors’ contact info and more tips on breaking into the book, read: How To Pitch: EatingWell.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Earn Up to $2 A Word At The Freelance-Driven Discover

Discover

Discover magazine is going through a bit of a makeover. The pub recently relocated their headquarters from New York City to Milwaukee and they’ve added a new editorial team. This science-driven monthly even has a revised mission statement: “To provide content that informs, inspires and entertains people who love science.”

Discover is 95 percent freelance written, and they need writers on all platforms. Editors are looking for strong multimedia content for their website, and if you’re into long-form writing, they also have a series of digital eBook singles. The pub’s editor-in-chief, Stephen C. George, says that the freelance field is wide open:

“Freelancers are our lifeblood,” George said, referring to the substantial amount of content that is freelance driven. When it comes to pitching, “We’re hungry for pitches from established science writers as well as those just starting in the field,” he said. Of immediate need are features on technology, physics, chemistry and other hard sciences. Archaeology writers, take note: “If there’s a great archaeology story out there — which I’m desperate for — I’d take it for [the] March/April 2014 [issue]!” said George.

For editors’ contact info and more tips on how to get published in this mag, read: How To Pitch: Discover.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Narratively Seeks New York-Centric Stories

Narratively

Narratively, the year-old website dedicated to New York stories, is the antithesis of the fast-paced, twitter-obsessed, homogeneous content that now pervades many online pubs. It was recently included in Time’s “50 Best Websites 2013” and boasts over 100,000 monthly visitors.

The site is committed to long form journalism and to stories that are under the radar. With 100 percent of its content coming from freelancers, storytellers of all forms of media are welcome to pitch:

The site’s tagline, “Local stories, boldly told,” is an apt description. Of the concept, editorial director Brendan Spiegel says, “We were all writers and photographers and reporters in New York who were interested in telling local, in-depth stories — human-interest stories; profiles of colorful characters, people and neighborhoods. The kind of thing that you don’t really see anymore now that newspaper metro sections are shrinking, and there’s not a lot of high-quality local journalism anymore.”

For editors’ contact info and pitching etiquette, read: How To Pitch: Narratively.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

This Pitch to AARP The Magazine Worked — Here’s Why

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Freelance writer Joan Trossman Bien knew she had an interesting story on her hands. A friend introduced her to Dulanie Ellis, a 64-year-old documentary filmmaker who discovered her true passion later on in life. Bien thought Ellis’ story was a perfect fit for AARP The Magazine, and pitched it as a profile for the feature well.

Features editor Margaret Guroff thought the piece would work better for the mag’s FOB, and passed it along to David Dudley. One of Ellis’ documentaries was about farm-to-vet programs, and Dudley thought it would be an ideal story for the mag’s “Upfront” section. “The bottom line here is that Joan’s idea had at least three or four big things going for it,” said Dudley. “It hit on an issue that we’d been wanting to write about. It had a simple, easily understood premise that would make sense even in a short 200-word piece. [And] it had a timely Veteran’s Day connection…”

THE PITCH:

Ms. Guroff:

I would like to write a profile for you about a woman who has truly found herself in the second act of her life and has made the many changes needed to accomplish her new passion. There is a new trend developing among baby boomers, brought about by a combination of circumstances and a belief that once you step aside, you lose your involvement in life. The majority do not intend to retire. Dulanie Ellis counts herself in that crowd.

To read the rest of the pitch and find out why the editors chose it, read: Pitches That Worked: AARP The Magazine.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

News-Driven Stories Land $1.50 A Word At Outside

Outside

Outside is looking for writers with a sense of adventure. The monthly mag features articles on pop culture, news, science, tech, fitness and more. Although one might assume the audience is primarily snowboarding dudes from Aspen, Colo., that’s not entirely the case.

Yes, the mag’s audience is predominately male, but many readers are city dwellers longing for an escape. The pub is 70 percent freelance written, and their newly redesigned website is on the hunt for writers keen on fast-breaking news.

The mag’s senior editor Abe Streep tells what kind of stories make it in the mag:

“A pitch on the best hikes in the National Parks probably won’t get you far,” said Streep. But travel news that leads to actionable service — say, a story on how the Grand Canyon’s new permitting system for rafters affects readers — is very welcome. News that leads to service is the ideal: new lodges, new technology, new training tools. The magazine is focusing more and more on its core mission: inspiring adventure. “We’re still looking for pop-culture stories,” said Streep, “but only those that are a natural fit for Outside.”

For editors’ contact info and more, read: How To Pitch: Outside.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Compelling Narratives Land $1 A Word at Hemispheres

Hemispheres

United Airlines’ Hemispheres doesn’t like to think of itself as just another airline mag. For one thing, it reaches more than 12 million fliers a month, and has attracted big name writers like The New York TimesDavid Carr and Esquire‘s Tom Chiarella.

The pub’s content is 80 percent freelance, and they are always looking for new writers with strong ideas:

“I think of us as a general-interest magazine, as opposed to something that’s more strictly in the travel category,” said Jordan Heller, Hemispheres‘ new editor-in-chief. Yes, the mag’s signature “Three Perfect Days” feature is still there, which highlights the ideal weekend travel itinerary in destinations across the globe, but in keeping with the vision of the EICs who came before him, Heller leans toward the kind of informative, well-reported, non-niche journalism one might find in Vanity Fair or Men’s Journal.

To hear more tips and editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Hemispheres.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

XoJane.com is Looking For Intimate Stories

xoJane

XoJane.com, the brainchild of Jane Pratt (of the lauded 90s mags Sassy and Jane) is an uber-successful women’s website with 2 million monthly uniques. The site focuses on personal essays, which cover a plethora of (often controversial) topics, including: gender issues, weight struggles, addiction, birth control, dating, pregnancy, food, fashion, pop culture and the list goes on…

The site’s success can be attributed to its authentic writing, and it certainly helps that there are zero stock photos used (writers must submit their own personal photos with each article they write). The pub’s content is 75 percent freelance, so it’s an ideal place for any scribe with a strong voice or opinion to get their foot in the door. Executive editor Emily McCombs explains what kind of writer they’re looking for:

Writers who are open to sharing their intimate stories will find xoJane.com to be ideal and edgier than other women’s sites. “I think our site is a lot more personal. Almost everything is [written in the] first person,” McCombs says. “Our [goal] is not aggregating or responding to what’s going on in the Internet. It’s mostly original content. We can get pretty outlandish. We’re not afraid to try something that might a little bit weird or a little bit crazy.”

To hear more tips on how to get published on xoJane.com, read How To Pitch: xoJane.com

Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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