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Posts Tagged ‘New York Times’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Hackers Threaten Violence Over Interview | NYT Layoffs Begin

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Sony Hackers Threaten Violence Over The Interview (Re/code)
A new message from the hackers who have infiltrated Sony Pictures Entertainment appeared to threaten violence at or near movie theaters where the studio plans to show The Interview. The group mentioned the film for the first time by name and threatened to take unspecified actions against its premiere, set for Dec. 25, writing, “The world will be full of fear” and “Remember the 11th of September.” WSJ A Department of Homeland Security official said Tuesday afternoon the agency was aware of the threat but added: “at this time there is no credible intelligence to indicate an active plot against movie theaters within the United States.” Variety “We recommend you to keep yourself distant from the places at that time. (If your house is nearby, you’d better leave.) Whatever comes in the coming days is called by the greed of Sony Pictures Entertainment,” the message reads. There have been suspicions that the attack may have been launched by North Korea in retaliation for the Interview’s depiction of an assassination attempt on Kim Jong-un. The country has denied involvement but praised the attacks. THR The Sony hackers also made good on their promise to release a so-called Christmas gift by posting an eighth batch of documents to the Internet on Tuesday. The documents appear to be the entire email account of Sony Pictures Entertainment chairman and CEO Michael Lynton. Lynton’s email account contains 12,466 messages, which presumably contains deleted messages, dating from Nov. 12, 2008 to Nov. 21, 2014, three days before the hack was first noticed by the studio. A special screening of the film took place in Los Angeles last week without incident. Deadline Landmark Theatres said Tuesday night that the New York premiere of the film has been canceled. The event was set for Thursday night at the Sunshine Cinema on the Lower East Side. BuzzFeed The film’s stars, Seth Rogen and James Franco, have withdrawn from all media appearances in the lead-up to the release of the film.

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Taking Another Look at That Bernard Weinraub Farewell Column

ShutterstockAmyPascal2013When Bernard Weinraub exited the New York Times in 2005, he of course composed a farewell column. That article contains what now seem like a number of very prophetic statements, given the criminal intrusion and Tinseltown reactions threatening his wife’s tenure as Sony Pictures co-chairman. Starting with this Weinraub observation about his 14 years covering Hollywood:

My marriage, and some of the events that tumbled out of it, taught me something about the ferocity of a culture in which the players can be best friends one day and savage you the next.

Maybe it was 24 hours then. But thanks to the solidified culture of texting, email and social media, it’s now nanoseconds. As some of Pascal’s emails have shown (and the press has failed to properly contextualize), one of the main jobs of a studio chief is to tell each fragile ego what they want and need to hear. Regardless of that studio chief’s personal, true beliefs.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Sony Demands News Orgs. Delete Data | Denby to Step Down

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Sony Pictures Demands News Agencies Delete ‘Stolen’ Data (NYT)
Sony Pictures Entertainment warned media outlets on Sunday against using the mountains of corporate data revealed by hackers who raided the studio’s computer systems in an attack that became public last month. THR Sony Pictures Entertainment lawyer David Boies sent a letter to news organizations Sunday, referring to leaked Sony documents as “stolen information” and demanded that the files be ignored, or destroyed if they had already been downloaded. “We are writing to ensure that you are aware that SPE does not consent to your possession, review, copying, dissemination, publication, uploading, downloading or making any use of the stolen information, and to request your cooperation in destroying the stolen information,” the letter reads. Variety The security breach and subsequent data dump has made public such internal financial documents as film budgets, earnings statements and emails from top Sony executives. It’s also resulted in a series of embarrassing revelations such as an email exchange between Sony Pictures Entertainment co-chair Amy Pascal and producer Scott Rudin in which the two made a series of racially charged jokes about President Barack Obama’s favorite movies. Both Rudin and Pascal have since apologized. Deadline The Sony information continues to be released in batches from unknown sources, including one Sunday in an email to news organizations that included a link to more information cached in online sites and promised an unspecified “Christmas gift” to come. Re/code A group claiming responsibility for the devastating hacking attack against Sony Pictures Entertainment on Sunday offered to selectively hold back on releasing email correspondence of its employees, provided that they write in and ask. The offer, apparently from the Guardians of Peace, a group that says it has carried out the attacks, marks a new twist in its ongoing campaign of embarrassing leaks of data stolen from the studio’s computers, now entering its third week.

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A Howler of a New York Times Correction

ShutterstockdoghowlBow Wow Ow!

In what stands, at this late calendar-year stage, as an instant frontrunner for New York Times Correction of the Year, the following note has been added to Rick Gladstone‘s December 12 piece suggesting that Pope Francis hinted well-behaved dogs were perhaps bounding past the Pearly Gates:

Correction: December 12, 2014

An earlier version of this article misstated the circumstances of Pope Francis’ remarks. He made them in a general audience at the Vatican, not in consoling a distraught boy whose dog had died. The article also misstated what Francis is known to have said. According to Vatican Radio, Francis said: “The Holy Scripture teaches us that the fulfillment of this wonderful design also affects everything around us,” which was interpreted to mean he believes animals go to heaven. Francis is not known to have said: “One day, we will see our animals again in the eternity of Christ. Paradise is open to all of God’s creatures.” (Those remarks were once made by Pope Paul VI to a distraught child, and were cited in a Corriere della Sera article that concluded Francis believes animals go to heaven.) An earlier version also referred incompletely to the largest animal protection group in the United States. It is the Humane Society of the United States, not just the Humane Society.

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The Luxury Approach to Newspapers Appears to be Working

WSJSubscriptionPromoIn a December 2012 essay, New Yorker staff writer John Cassidy noted how both the Wall Street Journal and New York Times seemed headed in an elitist digital subscriber direction. This afternoon, he’s back on the same general topic and guess what? It amounts to a “Bit of Good News About Journalism.”

Cassidy reminds that full annual digital subscriptions to these newspapers (once initial promotional rates end) are pricey: $348 for the Wall Street Journal, $455 for the New York Times and $467 for the Financial Times. But for dailies lucky enough to have the right median-income reader and workplace subscriptions base, it seems to be working:

At the Financial Times, the bulk of the company’s revenues now come from digital subscriptions, and the newspaper has been profitable for quite a while. [Spokesperson Rachel] Taub also told me that profits grew in the first half of 2014, driven by a rise in digital revenues. A spokesperson for the Journal wouldn’t comment on its finances, but earlier this month, the newspaper’s corporate sibling, Times Newspapers of the United Kingdom, which publishes the Times and the Sunday Times, recorded its first operating profit in thirteen years. That’s particularly notable because Times Newspapers was one of the first UK publishers to ditch the free-content model. Five years ago, it was losing more than a hundred million dollars a year.

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The Carpetbagger Bows to the Majesty of Angelina Jolie

ShutterstockAngelinaJolieMaleficentIn our humble opinion, the New York Times should have changed the name of its awards column to coincide with the recent beat takeover by Cara Buckley. “The Carpetbagger” is semi-clever and kind of makes etymological sense. But phonetically, it’s harsh; almost, obscene.

In any event, a little over six months into the roll-up-the-red-carpet-and-go, Buckley got some one-on-one time with the director of Unbroken at New York’s Porter House. The reporter starts off by suggesting that she won’t often focus in the column on one person, which seems counterproductive (isn’t awards season ultimately all about one person’s?). Later, Buckley touches on the latest strand of the Sony hack scandal as detailed by Sam Biddle:

Universal had arranged for her to have some one-on-one time with the Bagger a few hours after Ms. Jolie appeared on The Daily Show, and right before she held court at the Porter House party, where she would chat with Barbara Walters, among many others.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Winkler Out at Bloomberg | Ebola Fighters Are Time PoTY

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Matt Winkler Steps Down at Bloomberg News (FishbowlNY)
More changes at Bloomberg News, this time involving veteran editor-in-chief Matt Winkler, who is stepping down. Winkler has been editor of Bloomberg News for the past 24 years. Capital New York John Micklethwait, editor-in-chief of The Economist, will succeed Winkler, who co-founded the news service with Michael Bloomberg back in 1990. Micklethwait has edited The Economist since 2006. He will leave the company at the end of January. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The Economist is now searching for a replacement for Micklethwait, who joined the mag in 1987, a process that will very likely take several weeks. NYT On Tuesday, Bloomberg News named Winkler an editor-in-chief emeritus. One executive at Bloomberg, who was not authorized to speak publicly, said the change was a year in the making, but had accelerated since Bloomberg’s return to the company in September. Another Bloomberg executive said it was very much a joint decision based on the need for a cultural change in the news division, and that Bloomberg and Winkler remained close. HuffPost As editor-in-chief emeritus, Winkler will work with Bloomberg “on strategic initiatives, conducting high-profile interviews of global newsmakers and bringing his insights and expertise to the most important and market-moving stories.” Micklethwait will oversee editorial “across all Bloomberg platforms, including its news, newsletters, magazines, opinion, television, radio and digital properties,” according to a release. Bloomberg Media Group CEO Justin Smith, who is overseeing new consumer-facing sites for the company, like Bloomberg Politics, will continue reporting to Michael Bloomberg.

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Stuart Elliott Answers Readers for the Last Time

StuartElliottQALogoAs one of the many New York Times staffers who chose to accept the paper’s buyout offer, advertising beat reporter Stuart Elliott has put together his final questions list and checked it twice:

Dear readers, because this is the final issue of In Advertising, I am trying to clear the decks and am publishing more questions than usual.

Befitting his last such column, Elliott leads off with a doozy. A reader asks about a sly reference to Smith Brothers cough drops in an old, short-lived Red Foxx New York-set TV series. The columnist’s reply:

According to The Complete Directory of Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows 1946-Present, a reference book that is among the final ones remaining at my desk, the series was titled The Redd Foxx Show and it was broadcast by ABC for only three months in 1986, from January 18 to April 19.

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Daily Newspaper Vet Gives Print Delivery the Boot

MaxBootTwitterProfilePicOver the years, Max Boot (pictured) has worked as an editorial writer and op-ed editor for the Wall Street Journal, assistant national editor at the Christian Science Monitor and as a columnist for the Los Angeles Times. During his high school days in Reseda, California, he was the editor of both the official Cleveland High School newspaper and a second underground publication there.

As Boot writes today in Commentary, he never thought he’d see the day when no newspapers would be delivered to his doorstep. But after downscaling to weekend delivery, he has today officially made the switch to digital subscriptions only:

So what happened? In a word, the iPad. Blame or credit Steve Jobs: I have found that it’s simply easier to read newspapers on my iPad, rather than slogging downstairs to pick up the print copy – if it’s there.

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The Most Popular FishbowlNY Posts for The Week

StephenMSilvermanTwitterProfilePicHere’s a look at the FishbowlNY posts that made the most buzz this week.

1) People Editor Has a Rough Weekend

2) NY Times Vet Bill Carter Takes Buyout

3) Jed Hartman Leaves Time Inc. for WaPo

4) More NY Times Buyouts

5) Here is Condé Nast Traveler‘s New Logo

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[Image via: @stephenmsilverm]

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