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Posts Tagged ‘Newsweek’

How James Brown Helped a Fledgling Reporter Turn It Loose

ShutterstockJamesBrownThe day before James Brown answered the door at his home in Beech Island, South Carolina in the summer of 2003, reporter Karen Fragala Smith had valiantly rustled up bus fare. From her Huffington Post blog item:

I had withdrawn the last hundred bucks from my checking account and boarded a Greyhound bus for Augusta, Georgia, just over the state line from Beech Island. I was in town to interview James Brown for Newsweek magazine.

Well, sort of. I was an editorial assistant who spent most of my time arranging travel accommodations for the director of the foreign language editions, and making photocopies for an elderly editor who found both the technology of a copy machine and the fact that women in the office weren’t just secretaries anymore, to be equally confounding. I was eager to do something that resembled journalism.

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A Journalism Career That Started in the Toilet

TheParisHeraldCoverThose were the days… After getting out of the Army in 1960 and setting his sights on journalism, James Oliver Goldsborough enrolled in law school at UC Berkeley.

Then, per a write-up today in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette by Marylynne Pitz, this happened:

An Army buddy called from Daly City, just south of San Francisco, with great news. “We’‍ve just fired the assistant managing editor for drinking in the toilet. Would you like to try out?” his friend asked.

After a six-month stint in Daly City, Goldsborough moved to the San Francisco Examiner, where he was a cub reporter.

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Birthday Boy Tom Cruise Doing Better Than Newsweek

ShutterstockTomCruiseNMUnintentionally, D.B. Hebbard over at Talking New Media may wind up with today’s most original Tom Cruise born-on-the-third-of-July reference. Leading off a piece about Newsweek, the journalist writes:

The newsweekly is like Tom Cruise in Interview with the Vampire, it may still be alive, but it is not looking very good. At least that is what users of the digital edition are telling the publisher.

Well done. But what of the more conventional coverage today of an A-lister who belies the fact that he is on the Edge of Early Bird Specials?

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Cover Battle: Newsweek or V

Welcome back to another edition of FishbowlNY’s weekly Cover Battle. This round features Newsweek taking on V. For its latest cover, Newsweek features an illustration of George H.W. Bush and the Bush boys — George W. and Jeb — in a mock Game of Thrones scene. We’re just glad there’s no nudity.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Angelou Dies at 86 | Williams Interviews Snowden | Amazon Talks Hatchette Dispute

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Medal of Freedom Recipient Maya Angelou Dies at 86 (FishbowlDC)
Poet and author Maya Angelou died Wednesday at the age of 86, according to her literary agent Helen Brann. Angelou received the country’s highest civilian honor — the Medal of Freedom — in 2011 from President Obama, and is most widely known for her award-winning memoir I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings. NYT The cause of death was not immediately known, but Brann said Angelou had been frail for some time and had heart problems. GalleyCat In addition to writing, Angelou proved to be an accomplished Renaissance woman who worked as an activist, entertainer, streetcar conductor, magazine editor, college professor and lecturer. CNN Angelou’s legacy is twofold. She leaves behind a body of important artistic work that influenced several generations. But the 86-year-old was praised by those who knew her as a good person, a woman who pushed for justice and education and equality. In her full life, she wrote staggeringly beautiful poetry. She also wrote a cookbook and was nominated for a Tony. Reuters Literary and entertainment figures, politicians and fans mourned her passing on Wednesday. Obama said his sister, Maya, was named for the author, whom he called “a brilliant writer, a fierce friend and a truly phenomenal woman.” Media mogul Oprah Winfrey, who frequently threw lavish birthday parties for Angelou and considered her a mentor, said she would remember her friend most for how she lived her life. “She moved through the world with unshakeable calm, confidence and a fierce grace,” Winfrey said.

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Mark Miller Resigns from The Hollywood Reporter

MarkMillerTwitterProfilePicA year and a half after joining the surging Hollywood concern as deputy editorial director, former Newsweek-Daily Beast staffer Mark Miller has decided it’s time to move on. At press time, it’s unclear whether Miller is transitioning to another job or taking a break.

Here’s the memo sent out today by Janice Min:

Dear Staff -

I know Mark announced his resignation in the edit meeting this morning, but with so many of us traveling today, I wanted to drop a quick note to make sure everyone on staff was aware.

In the coming days and weeks, [executive managing editor] Sudie [Redmond] and I will work to ensure all his duties and responsibilities are well-covered and cared for.

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Magazine Launches on Upswing

magazine stack GMagazines are alive and well, and the first few months of the year prove it. According to The New York Post, there were 45 magazines launched in the first quarter of this year, up from 27 a year ago.

Some of those debuts have been heavyweights — like Dr. Oz’s The Good Life, Capital New York and Branché, the popup title from Marie Claire — while some have been lightweights, such as the return of Sesame Street Magazine, which had folded in 2008.

“I was shocked when I put this together and saw the number [of launches],” MediaFinder’s president, Trish Hagood, told Crain’s New York. “So many of them are really solid publications.”

Newsweek also re-launched during the first quarter of this year, but uh, well… We think enough has been said about how that went.

Newsweek Hunts for Publisher

Newsweek is searching for a publisher after a deal with someone (who is not being named!) fell through. Etienne Uzac, CEO of the magazine’s parent — IBT Media — told WWD that they hope to have someone filling the role before summer.

“What we’re looking for is indeed a publisher in the traditional sense of the term, whether we call it a publisher or a head of sales,” Uzac explained. “Essentially, it’s someone who can head up digital sales among other things.”

Uzac added that the publisher would refine Newsweek’s mobile products, hire new editorial and marketing staffers, and find and then expand new sources of revenue.

Newsweek’s publisher will not, we assume, be asked to help with fact checking. Though that might not be a bad idea.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Newsweek Controversy | Mexico Moves on Telco | NJ President Out

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newsweek bitcoin

Controversy Marks Newsweek’s Comeback (The Associated Press)
A mystery man. A splashy reveal. A media frenzy. Newsweek staked its return from the dead Friday on a story it knew would get attention. A cover story claiming it had uncovered “the face behind Bitcoin,” the world’s most popular digital currency. Twenty-four hours after identifying Bitcoin’s creator as a 64-year-old former defense contractor employee living in Los Angeles, the controversy over whether or not Newsweek had outed the right man was so furious that Newsweek reporter Leah McGrath Goodman made the rounds on Bloomberg TV and CBS Morning News to defend her reporting against Dorian Nakamoto’s denials that he is the father of Bitcoin. Mashable For the first few hours after the article was published online Thursday, Newsweek enjoyed the kind of attention that most publications would kill for. The Bitcoin story dominated the conversation on social media; 700,000 readers had viewed it as of 5 p.m. ET on Thursday. It went on to top 1 million views. FishbowlNY Within the first few hours of the story’s release, however, Nakamoto emerged to deny any involvement with the digital currency, prompting a media frenzy. In a two-hour interview with the AP Thursday, Nakamoto denied having any involvement in Bitcoin, and the only reason he had ever heard of it was because a Newsweek reporter contacted his son three weeks ago. Nakamoto also said that during a brief interview at his home, McGrath Goodman misunderstood him (English isn’t Nakamoto’s first language). Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The account that created Bitcoin in 2009 has also suggested that the Newsweek story is inaccurate: “I’m not Dorian Nakamoto,” said the account holder, whose online name is Satoshi Nakamoto, according to USA Today. Newsweek In a statement released Friday, Newsweek defended the story: “Goodman’s research was conducted under the same high editorial and ethical standards that have guided Newsweek for more than 80 years. Newsweek stands strongly behind Goodman and her article”

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Tina Brown on Newsweek: ‘I’m so Glad I’m Not the Editor’

Tina Brown was routinely criticized during her time as Newsweek’s editor, so it’s not surprising to hear that she’s happy she doesn’t have to deal with the magazine’s Bitcoin story fiasco.

In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Brown was asked what would happen if Newsweek’s story was proven wrong. “That would be rough,” replied Brown. “All I can think of is I’m so glad I’m not the editor.”

Brown also commented on the challenges Newsweek faces, which have been echoed by many:

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