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Posts Tagged ‘npr’

Morning Media Newsfeed: O’Donnell’s Return Official | Emmy Noms Favor CNN, Social TV

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rosie o'donnell the view

Rosie O’Donnell Officially Returning to The View (TVNewser)
Rosie O’Donnell is returning to The View as a co-host in the fall, ABC confirmed via Twitter Thursday. Variety O’Donnell will join moderator Whoopi Goldberg. ABC execs are in the midst of a extensive search for new producers to take the reins of The View as the show prepares to replace panelists Sherri Shepherd and Jenny McCarthy, who recently exited the daytime program. THR / The Live Feed O’Donnell, who was a panelist on The View for the 2007-2008 season, left after just one year. O’Donnell had a notably stormy tenure on the show, often fighting with conservative panelist Elisabeth Hasselbeck, who suggested on Fox News on Wednesday that O’Donnell had been plotting her return to the show for “a very, very long time.” HuffPost TMZ reported Tuesday that the former co-host would be returning, claiming that O’Donnell had been in “active talks” with the show. This will be ABC’s first move to put back the pieces after the major overhaul that left Whoopi Goldberg as the show’s only remaining co-host. In June, Shepherd and McCarthy announced that they would be leaving, and ABC implied in a statement that their departures were not voluntary. Barbara Walters, the show’s creator, retired in May and Joy Behar and Hasselbeck both exited the show in 2013. NYT O’Donnell’s name immediately arose as most likely to be the first-named replacement. Her outspoken and often politically oriented commentary helped spark a surge in the show’s ratings. A committed liberal with strong views on numerous topics, she also got into some widely publicized feuds, with Donald Trump and others.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Díaz-Balart to MSNBC | NPR Cuts Tell Me More | Sulzberger Talks

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José Díaz-Balart Named MSNBC’s 10 A.M. Host (TVNewser)
Telemundo anchor José Díaz-Balart has been named MSNBC’s 10 a.m. anchor, replacing Chris Jansing, who is leaving MSNBC to become NBC’s senior White House correspondent. HuffPost He will host his MSNBC show from Miami and take over when Jansing departs in June. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Díaz-Balart will continue to co-anchor Telemundo’s Noticiero Telemundo and host Enfoque Con José Díaz-Balart. Ari Melber, a co-host on MSNBC’s afternoon program The Cycle, had been in the running against Díaz-Balart for the 10 a.m. slot, several sources said in recent weeks. The Associated Press MSNBC president Phil Griffin said Tuesday the deal has been in the works for some nine months. Griffin says he’s wanted to snag Díaz-Balart for years but had to find a time slot that wouldn’t conflict with the nightly news on Telemundo, which is also a division of NBC Universal. Díaz-Balart is the brother of U.S. Rep. Mario Díaz-Balart and former Rep. Lincoln Díaz-Balart. His aunt was the first wife of Cuban leader Fidel Castro. Variety Díaz-Balart began his career in 1983 and has reported historic events and interviewed major political figures for prestigious news outlets including NBC News and Telemundo. His achievements include being the first journalist to serve as news anchor on two national television networks in Spanish and English on the same day for an entire season.

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NPR Ends Tell Me More, Cuts 28

nprNPR is canceling Tell Me More and cutting 28 staffers as part of an effort to save money. The cuts, in addition to earlier buyouts, are expected to save NPR about $7 million a year.

Michel Martin, Tell Me More’s host, and Carline Watson, the show’s executive editor, will remain at the network.

“These times require that we organize ourselves in different ways and that we’re smarter about how we address the different platforms that we reach our audiences on,” NPR’s executive VP and chief content officer Kinsey Wilson said, in a statement. “We’re trying to make the most of the resources that we have and ensure that we keep radio healthy and try to develop audience in the digital arena.”

Tell Me More’s last episode will be August 1.

Morning Media Newsfeed: NPR Appoints CEO | Colbert’s Successor Named | Clippers Tap Parsons

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Jarl Mohn Becomes NPR President and CEO (FishbowlDC)
The board of directors of NPR announced Friday that it has selected Jarl Mohn to become its next president and chief executive officer. WSJ Mohn is becoming the fifth leader in a five-year stretch marred by scandal and financial woes. Mohn hails from a flashier background than some of his predecessors at NPR. He spent years as a radio DJ, under the pseudonym Lee Masters, and served as an executive at MTV and VH1 before creating and running E! Entertainment Television. He subsequently served as chief executive of Liberty Digital Inc., a subsidiary of Liberty Media Group focused on interactive and cable television. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Mohn, who currently serves as chairman of Southern California Public Radio, will begin his tenure as CEO on July 1. He was recruited by acting CEO Paul Haaga, who had been running the network since September after the unexpected resignation of Gary Knell, who left to join National Geographic. Deadline New York Knell left NPR after 21 months on the job, succeeding Vivian Schiller, who was forced to resign over a string of controversies. In September NPR hoped to cut its staff by 10 percent by offering staffers a voluntary buyout. It was part of a two-year plan to eliminate an operating cash deficit expected to hit $6.1 million. HuffPost / AP Board chair Kit Jensen says Mohn has a keen ability to identify media and consumer trends and has a strong track record on diversity and fairness. Mohn said in a statement that he considers the new position a mission, not a job.

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Seth Meyers Has a Newfound Appreciation for Pockets

NPRFreshAirLogoThe Web headline for today’s NPR Fresh Air interview with Seth Meyers is a good example of click-baiting with integrity. Because listening to the conversation titled “Seth Meyers’ Late Night Challenge: What To Do With His Hands?” does indeed address and answer one of the first bits of self-conscious business for the incoming talk show host:

“The trickiest part of this job the first week was just figuring out what to do with my hands. I think one of the great discoveries I made at the show was the memory of pockets. I was like, ‘OK, I can put one of these away.’”

“I as a person in conversation tend to use my hands a great deal and I think my first couple of monologues I looked like someone on a desert island trying to signal for a passing plane.”

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Unlike Many Music Journalists, NPR’s Ann Powers Does Her Homework

AnnPowersNPRPicFive years ago, NPR music critic Ann Powers relocated from Los Angeles to, of all places, Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The trigger for the move was her husband Eric Weisbard‘s acceptance of a teaching position in the American studies department at the University of Alabama.

Powers tells student newspaper The Crimson White that she did not expect her move to correspond with a musical-artists renaissance in the U.S. south. She also reveals to Francie Johnson that laziness in the music journalism business remains pervasive:

To prepare for her interviews, Powers listens to the artists’ catalogs and spends time researching online and in music archives. “You’d be shocked to know how many times I’ve talked to artists, and they’ve said journalists will come in completely unprepared,” Powers said. “That just seems ridiculous to me. You wouldn’t talk to the president without knowing the issues. Why do you think it’s okay to talk to an artist without knowing their work?”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Comcast Courts FCC | Kasell to Retire From NPR | CNN’s Primetime Test

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Comcast Points to NBCU Deal to Convince Regulators (Financial Times)
Comcast is trumpeting its compliance with conditions attached to its 2009 acquisition of NBCUniversal as a model for how to convince regulators to approve its $45.2 billion bid for rival cable operator Time Warner Cable. Variety Comcast launched another prong in its strategy, announcing a pledge to continue offering basic broadband for $9.95 per month to low-income families indefinitely. Effectively, the cable giant is spinning the expanded low-cost Internet Essentials program as one of the key benefits of the proposed deal for Time Warner Cable — despite the fact that post-deal, Comcast would control nearly one-third of U.S. broadband market. CNET Comcast started the Internet Essentials program as part of a voluntary commitment it made to the Federal Communications Commission in order to get its merger with NBCUniversal approved. Back then, the company promised to keep the program up and running for three years. Adweek The program provides eligible low-income families with $9.95/month Internet service, an option to purchase a computer for under $150 and multiple options for digital literacy training. In two and a half years, Comcast has signed up 1.2 million low-income Americans or 300,000 families. Internet Essentials dovetails nicely with President Obama’s ConnectED program to increase digital literacy and the FCC’s recent plan to invest an additional $2 billion over the next two years to support broadband in schools and libraries. Bloomberg Comcast executive VP David Cohen will hold meetings at the FCC through Wednesday, said two agency officials knowledgeable about the plans. Comcast, the largest U.S. cable company, needs approval from the FCC and antitrust officials at the Justice Department for its proposed purchase of New York-based Time Warner Cable, the No. 2 carrier. The Time Warner deal would create “appropriate scale” that enables Comcast to invest in new services, and would create a new national advertiser to increase competition in that market, Cohen said.

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NPR Tries to Extract Lessons from Rapper’s Fake NYT Article Stunt

Earlier this month, New York Times reviewer Jon Caramanica’s name was taken in vain by Queens rap artist Shirt. The musician mocked up a fake article with the journalist’s byline and e-circulated it as an upside-down way to promote his personal brand.

NPRTheRecordLogoToday, Brooklyn-based writer Kris Ex very intelligently dissects the lessons in a lengthy NPR.org blog post. There’s no doubt Shirt derived a ton of publicity from the bizarre maneuver. But what does the PR stunt mean more broadly, if anything? Notes Ex:

While Shirt’s stated goals are art and promotion, the rapper (perhaps unwittingly) has made telling commentary about the hip-hop journalism playing field. In the wake of his stunt, he’s generated more thoughtful digital ink than he has in four years of putting out actual product.

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Next Media Animation Production Cycle Reduced to a Ridiculous Two and a Half Hours

Whether it’s Mayor Rob Ford or President Barack Obama, the gang at Taipei’s Next Media Animation has turned spoofing breaking and current news events into one fine, accelerated science.

From a recent report on All Things Considered:

Animation is painstaking, time-consuming work. When it first started seven years ago, the animation staff produced one story a day. But after years of trial and error, Next Media, which now employs 200 animators, perfected its pipeline to the fastest it’s ever been — going from story conception to a finished product in less than 2 1/2 hours.

NMA presently cranks out more than four dozen animations per day. Their YouTube channel registers 40-million-plus views per month.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Patch Shutting Down? | Megyn Kelly on Santa | NYT Making Changes

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AOL Chief’s White Whale Finally Slips His Grasp (NYT)
Tim Armstrong, the chief executive of AOL, is finally winding down Patch, a network of local news sites that he helped invent and that AOL bought after he took over. At a conference in Manhattan last week, Armstrong suggested that Patch’s future could include forming partnerships with other companies, an acknowledgment that AOL could not continue to go it alone in what has been a futile attempt to guide Patch to profitability. He called it, somewhat hilariously, “an asset with optionality.” There may be a few options for Patch, but none come close to the original vision for the site. The hunt to own the lucrative local advertising market, Armstrong’s white whale, is over. TechCrunch If Patch is shuttered for good, that represents a significant blow for Armstrong, who has nurtured the site as a pet project since launching it in 2007 while he was still at Google. AOL bought Patch in 2009 after Armstrong became its CEO. AOL says the report that Patch is winding down is “factually inaccurate.”

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