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Posts Tagged ‘Richard Prince’

Freelancers Caught in the Middle of Sister2Sister Bankruptcy Filing

It’s a familiar scenario; but for anyone suddenly told by a newspaper or magazine that they cannot be paid for work dutifully submitted and published, it sucks.

Per Journal-isms’ Richard Prince, this tweet from Manny Otiko reflects the fact that Sister2Sister has been forced to file for bankruptcy protection as it abandons print and seeks to reorganize. From his report:

“The community does not want us to go away,” publisher Jamie Foster Brown said by telephone. She said she especially felt a responsibility to prisoners who “didn’t have a voice” and whom she published in the magazine. “We wanted to teach people through celebrities,” she said. “God comes through other people.”

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ESPN Co-Host Absent from Airwaves After Ugly NABJ Incident

According to a Facebook comment relayed this morning by Journal-isms columnist Richard Prince, most of those attending an NABJ convention party last Friday night at the House of Blues in Orlando “had no clue” that former NFL player Hugh Douglas went crazy on his ESPN2 co-host Michael Smith. But thanks to weekend coverage of the alcohol-fueled scuffle by thebiglead.com’s Jason McIntyre and all sorts of subsequent media pick-up, it could cost Douglas dearly.

As noted by awfulannouncing.com, Douglas has been absent this week from his daily ESPN2 show Numbers Never Lie alongside Smith and third co-host Jemele Hill. From McIntyre’s follow-up item:

After the third [House of Blues party] threat, Smith tried to walk away, at which point Douglas grabbed Smith’s wrist and hurled two racial epithets at him, calling him an “Uncle Tom” and a “House N—-.” Smith, the witness says, turned around to protect himself, at which point onlookers rushed in to break it up.

Three independent sources have verified this version of events.

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PBS Talk Show Host Tavis Smiley Tangles with KFI’s Mo ‘Kelly

In his latest Journal-isms column, Richard Prince retraces some contentious recent chronology involving Tavis Smiley and Mo ‘Kelly (a.k.a. Morris W. O’Kelly, pictured).

Kelly, who once worked for Smiley, has been accusing Smiley of using a national poverty-focused outreach tour as a means of personal grandstanding. The feud went public and got nastier last week when The Wave newspaper’s Betty Pleasant reported that Smiley had sent Kelly a cease-and-desist letter. From Prince’s item:

Smiley publicly remained silent, but the story by Pleasant gained steam as its message was repeated on at least two black-oriented websites, the black entertainment outlet EUR Web and radio host Tom Joyner‘s Black America Web.

Then, on Sunday, EUR Web published an “open letter” to Smiley from Najee Ali, director of Los Angeles-based Project Islamic HOPE (Helping Oppressed People Everywhere), siding with O’Kelly.

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CJR Proves Media Columnist Richard Prince’s Point

A funny thing happened on the way to our Wednesday August 22 “So What Do You Do?” interview with “Journal-isms” media columnist Richard Prince. Columbia Journalism Review staff writer Michael Meyer published a Tuesday blog item highlighting some of the other media critics besides Jim Romenesko worth reading. And forgot to include Prince.

We know this because Prince touched on the CJR oversight in the mid-week edition of his Maynard Institute column. While a reader later added Prince’s name via the comments, the omission reinforced one of the most revealing points made during our conversation:

“When we talk about the lack of diversity in the media in general, it’s also true about the lack of diversity in media columns. In other words, “Journal-isms” does not get linked to by a lot of the predominantly white news sites. We’re not on their radar screen and we’re not important to them.”

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Veteran Journalist Richard Prince Talks Media Diversity

After getting his start at New Jersey’s Star-Ledger, Richard Prince went on to Washington Post where he became part of the “Metro Seven,” a group of African-American journalists who took issue with the paper’s discriminatory practices.

“It was a harbinger of other such cases that took place at other publications, including Newsweek and The New York Times, regarding not only black journalists, but women journalists, to both increase the numbers of these groups and equalize the pay scale,” he recalled in Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview. “We never went to court, but after our efforts there was another case at the New York Daily News that did.”

Read the full interview at So What Do You Do, Richard Prince, Columnist for the Maynard Institute?

HuffPost LatinoVoices Editor Now in Charge of HuffPost BlackVoices Too

HuffPost just underwent some major personnel changes at the top of its black and Latino sites, reports Richard Prince at the Maynard Institute. HuffPost BlackVoices editor Gene Demby has stepped down to become a political editor at HuffPost. Instead of hiring a new managing editor, HuffPost LatinoVoices editor Miguel Ferrer will now head both sites.

Demby had only been in charge of the site since last October.

Despite the turnover, as Prince notes, HuffPost BlackVoices’ 2,604,000 unique visitors per month is second only to BET.com among black-oriented sites.

NYABJ Disappointed at AP for Dropping the Ball on Diversity

The New York Association of Black Journalists issued a statement about last week’s dismissal of Robert Naylor from the Associated Press where he was the director of career development/news.

In the statement, NYABJ calls Naylor a “long-time diversity advocate” and makes the connection between the lay-off and the reintroduction of AP’s internship program, announced a day later. “Naylor was instrumental in shaping the careers of countless minority journalists through the AP’s internship program, which was reinstated last week after a yearlong hiatus due to budget cuts,” the release states.

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Society of Professional Journalists Votes to End Use of Term ‘Illegal Alien’

The Society of Professional Journalists voted this week to support the recommendation that newsrooms abandon the terms “illegal immigrant” and “illegal alien.” According to Richard Prince at the Maynard Institute, the 7,800 member organization passed the resolution with a voice vote after SPJ and National Association of Hispanic Journalists member Rebecca Aguilar shared her family’s story of the shame they feel every time they hear those terms in the media.

Surprisingly, the motion has yet to generate much controversy from the nativist blogosphere. Because this is exactly the type of thing that gets them in a lather–media supporting what they would undoubtedly consider a “liberal” position. We’re guessing they haven’t heard about it yet.

The full text of the resolution, via Prince, is posted after the jump.

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Columnist Says Sly Stone ‘Homeless’ Story Stinks

Three days after the New York Post caused a sensation with an article portaying Sly Stone as homeless and living in a van in LA’s Crenshaw district, Showbiz 411 columnist Roger Friedman is setting the record straight:

My source says that Sly’s attorney, Robert Alan, rented him a very nice home in Woodland Hills, California with four bedrooms, a pool, etc. (Alan declined to comment.) Sly just refuses to go there. Another friend tells me, “Sly always liked living in Winnebagos. He never liked being in a house.”

There’s an even more egregious aspect to the Post article. Per Friedman, Alan was willing to confirm that article author Willem Alkema (not the paper itself) paid Stone $5,000 for the interview.* According to Friedman, another $2,000 was doled out once the paper ran with the piece, though the columnist notes it’s unclear where the additional money came from.

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Alternative Weekly Association Gets a New Name

The Association of Alternative Newsweeklies–of which the LA Weekly, OC Weekly, Pasadena Weekly and San Diego CityBeat are members–just voted to give itself a name change. The organization will now be called the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. The name change was apparently inspired by the acceptance of The American Independent News Network–an online only news venture which operates sites in Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, Texas, and Washington–into the AAN fold.

In other AAN news, Richard Prince has an interesting piece about diversity in the alt…newsmedia world. Prince sat on a panel at the recent AAN conference in New Orleans, alongside Doris Truong, president of the Asian American Journalists Association, and Robert Hernandez, an assistant professor at the USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, to discuss why the altnews world is “so white.”

Most cities have alt-weeklies. They are often brash, muckraking and edge-pushing; they tell you where to find the best entertainment for the weekend — and they are usually very white. The association has no figures, but their staffs seem to be whiter than their mainstream counterparts, the dailies.

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