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Posts Tagged ‘Snow Fall’

Newsweek/The Daily Beast Gets a Redesign

Everyone loved The New York Times’ digital Snow Fall piece. We praised it. It won a Pulitzer. Even Jill Abramson started using Snow Fall as a verb. Now Newsweek/The Daily Beast appears to be taking it a step farther. Its site redesign is very similar to Snow Fall. It features a giant banner photo at the top of each story, and (while in beta) no ads among the copy.

Baba Shetty, CEO of NewsBeast, told Ad Age that the site’s design was already in place when Snow Fall was published, and that might be true. Either way, the new Newsweek/Daily Beast is great. It’s clean and bold.

One thing we do worry about? Shetty says that when ads do come to the new site, they’ll be going the sponsored/native route. Shetty said that they’ll be “beautiful, high-impact units.” Let’s all hope that doesn’t actually mean “Annoying, disruptive ads that try too hard to mimic editorial.”

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Jill Abramson Slings Media Slang

During a talk at the Museum of Jewish Heritage, Jill Abramson showed off some fresh media slang, so try and keep up, suckas. If you’re in the media business, you better educate yourself of the following, via Capital New York:

  • Snowfall (verb): To create an amazing digital feature, such as the Pulitzer-winning “Snow Fall” piece published by the New York Times last December. “Everyone wants to snowfall now, every day, all desks,” said Abramson.
  • Pizza Story (noun): A complex, breaking news story that requires extensive reporting. “The pizza boxes stack up,” when such a story happens, explained Abramson.

Now we know you’re wondering if these are real slang terms or just nonsense. But trust us. If you use either and your colleague or editor questions their validity, don’t even worry about it. They need to check themselves; not you.