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Posts Tagged ‘The New Republic’

The New Republic is Confused

The New Republic’s latest cover boldly states “Don’t Send your Kid to the Ivy League.” The accompanying piece has caused quite a stir, mainly because typically, going to Harvard or Princeton is what is known as a Good Thing. The stance is also interesting because — as Newsweek reported — over 50 percent of TNR’s editorial team has either an undergraduate or graduate degree from an Ivy League school.

Harvard leads the way, with 18 TNR editorial staffers (including owner and editor-in-chief, Chris Hughes) as alumni. Columbia comes in second place with 14 and Yale comes in third, with nine.

If having an Ivy League education is obviously helpful when applying for a job at TNR, wouldn’t that mean you should send your kids to one of those schools? After all, TNR is a great magazine. We imagine most writers looking for employment would be quite happy working there.

We’re confused. And so is TNR, apparently. You’d think all those Ivy Leaguers would have been able to figure this out.

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Jennifer Hicks Joins Condé Nast Traveler

Jennifer Hicks has been named associate publisher, sales, of Condé Nast Traveler. Hicks comes to the magazine from The New Republic, where she had served as VP of advertising for the past two years. Prior to joining TNR, Hicks served as group publisher of Smithsonian and publisher of Modern Bride. 

“We are thrilled to welcome Jennifer Hicks to Condé Nast Traveler,” said Bill Wackermann, Traveler’s executive VP and publishing director, in a statement. “Her deep understanding of both print and digital, combined with her ingenuity at developing integrated programs that include native content, video, custom content, and events, as well as her years of management experience, make her a great asset to our executive team.”

Hicks’ appointment is effective June 23.

TNR and The Atlantic Make Editorial Changes

A few Revolving Door notes for you this early afternoon, involving The New Republic and The Atlantic. Details are below.

  • TNR has promoted Amanda Silverman to deputy editor and Linda Kinstler to managing editor. The magazine has also hired Rebecca Leber as a staff writer. Silverman was most recently TNR’s managing editor. Kinstler most recently served as a reporter-researcher. Leber comes to TNR from ThinkProgress.
  • The Atlantic has named Sophie Gilbert senior editor of The Atlantic Weekly, an iPhone app from the magazine. She most recently served as an arts editor for the Washingtonian. Denise Kersten Wills is also joining as senior editor of the glossy. Kersten Wills comes to The Atlantic from Politico.

Cover Battle: Fast Company or The New Republic

Welcome back to another edition of FishbowlNY’s weekly Cover Battle. This fight features Fast Company taking on The New Republic. For its latest issue, Fast Company went with a photograph of Anna Kendrick lying on what looks like a giant bed of hair. Gross. Imagine the dandruff that thing creates.

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The New Republic Adds Jason Zengerle, Names Two Senior Editors

The New Republic has named three new senior editors this week. Details are below.

    • Jason Zengerle is returning to TNR, where he once worked for 12 years. He will serve as a senior editor. Zengerle most recently served as a senior staff writer at Politico. Prior to that, Zengerle served as contributing editor for GQ and New York.
    • Rebecca Traister joins TNR from Salon, where she had been since 2003. Previously, she was a writer for The New York Observer. Traister is the author of Big Girls Don’t Cry: The Election That Changed Everything For American Women, a 2010 New York Times Notable Book and winner of the Ernesta Drinker Ballard Book Prize.
    • Evgeny Morozov moves up from contributing editor of TNR to senior editor. His work has appeared in The New York TimesThe Wall Street JournalThe Washington Post, Financial TimesThe Economist and more. Morozov has also written two books.

The New Republic Boosts Sales Team, BuzzFeed Adds Reporter

A couple Revolving Door notes for you today: The New Republic has added two to its sales and marketing team and BuzzFeed has added a criminal justice reporter. Details are below.

  • Erik Carlson and Diana Ryan are joining The New Republic as director of integrated advertising and integrated marketing manager, respectively. Carlson comes to TNR from Say Media, where he served as a sales exec. Ryan most recently served as senior coordinator of content and programming at The Atlantic.
  • Katie J.M. Baker is joining BuzzFeed as a reporter covering criminal justice and legal/social issues in higher education. Baker was most recently a reporter with Newsweek.

Cover Battle: Sports Illustrated or The New Republic

It’s another miserable snowy day in the city, so why not take some of the edge off by enjoying FishbowlNY’s weekly Cover Battle? This Thursday we have Sports Illustrated versus The New Republic. SI went with a great photo of Michael Sam, the courageous young man who is about to become the first openly gay player in the NFL. We don’t really need more of a reason to choose this cover than that.

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The New Republic Discovers That Media Reporters are Self-Important

magazinesThe New Republic has uncovered something: Some media reporters and those in the media are full of themselves. In its exploration of why people care about The Wire’s “media diet” feature (in which journalists list what they read), TNR found that there’s a lot of bragging and/or lying going on:

Divulging your media diet is the more elite equivalent of sharing a Granta link on Twitter to demonstrate your obscure and fashionable tastes. And it’s easy to see why the media loves a media diet: it stokes industry vanity, it smacks of insideriness, it reflects assorted journo-rivalries and feuds…

To read the past few years’ worth of media diets is to witness the inexorable slide into greater and greater delusion in our virtual self-depictions…

Surprise!

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The New Republic Asked Staffers to Sell Subscriptions

The New Republic has figured out a way to increase readership: Turn staffers into salespeople. Forbes reports that TNR staffers were tempted via the promise of an iPad Mini to sell as many subscriptions to the glossy as possible over the course of two weeks.

The idea worked, as the magazine gained 309 new subscribers. The winner of the contest — and thus the owner of a shiny new iPad Mini — was Julia Ioffe, who sold 55 subscriptions.

When asked about pushing editorial staffers into the world of sales, a TNR spokesperson told Forbes it was “a team building exercise and a fun way to generate friendly competition among the staff.”

We can’t wait until the next TNR contest, when the staffer who gets the bathroom the cleanest wins a Jeans Friday.

Chris Hughes: Separation of Business and Editorial ‘Anachronistic’

Chris Hughes, the owner and editor-in-chief of The New Republic, thinks that he needs to oversee both advertising and editorial in order for the magazine to excel. In a talk with pandoDaily, Hughes said that the days of keeping those sides separate are over“I knew that in buying a content and media company, the idea that business sits over here and lets a newsroom do whatever it wants over there is anachronistic,” explained Hughes.

For many in the media world, that’s a controversial stance. And since Hughes doesn’t have much journalism experience (he did edit his high school paper!), it must be difficult for the TNR’s editors to trust him. However, Hughes does have plenty of business savvy, so maybe he’s doing the magazine a favor by controlling both sides.

Whatever ends up happening, you can count on The New York Times saying it was great.

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