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Posts Tagged ‘The New Yorker’

The New Yorker to Launch New Paywall

Beginning July 21, The New Yorker’s content — dating back to 2007 — will be available for all to read online. We suggest you take advantage of this, because in three months, the glossy is closing everything back up; sealed behind a new, metered paywall.

The New York Times reports that the motivation behind opening up newyorker.com was to find out how readers interacted with the site, and then use that data to construct the revamped paywall. The magazine also hopes to add subscribers via the promotion.

We’re excited about this idea, because in the past, it was almost pointless to go to The New Yorker’s site unless you were a subscriber. You never really knew which articles would be available to non-subscribers, and the selection was always minimal.

David Remnick, the magazine’s editor, admitted as much. He told the Times that their method for selecting magazine content that was available online was “awkward” and had “long since outlived its conception.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Coulson Gets 18 Months | SiriusXM Fires Opie & Anthony‘s Cumia

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Andy Coulson Gets 18 Months in Tabloid Phone Hacking (NYT)
Andy Coulson, a former senior editor in Rupert Murdoch’s news empire and a onetime adviser to Prime Minister David Cameron, was sentenced on Friday to 18 months in prison for his part in the phone hacking scandal that convulsed Britain’s press, police and political elite and inspired calls for tighter regulation of journalists. HuffPost / AP Coulson was convicted June 24 after an eight-month trial triggered by a tabloid-wrongdoing scandal that led Murdoch to shut down the News of The World in 2011. Another former editor, Rebekah Brooks, and four others were acquitted. The Guardian The offense carries a maximum sentence of two years’ imprisonment, but Coulson received a discount of several months for his previous good character. He could be out in less than nine months because, as a non-violent offender, he is required to serve just half his sentence. THR Three other former News of the World staffers and one private investigator who hacked phones for the paper also pleaded guilty to hacking and also received their sentences Friday. They are former news desk editors Greg Miskiw, James Weatherup and Neville Thurlbeck, as well as Glenn Mulcaire, a private investigator who was used for hacking. Miskiw and Thurlbeck were sentenced to six months each, Weatherup got a suspended sentence of four months, and Mulcaire was given a suspended sentence of six months. Variety Coulson faces a retrial along with former royals editor Clive Goodman on separate charges that they made illegal payments to police officers to obtain royal phone directories. Over a period of more than a decade, journalists at the now-shuttered Sunday paper listened in on thousands of voicemails belonging to celebrities, politicians and crime victims.

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Dick Cavett Revisits Alcohol-Soaked ‘Worst Show’

In the brand new book about The Tonight Show with Jay Leno by show producer David Berg, one of the many memorable guest anecdotes involves how Quentin Tarantino in 2003 hit “The Jay Bar” cart a little too hard and paid the incoherent, frenetic price.

Reading about that brought back memories of an even more epic artifact from the annals of late night slosh. Back in September 1970, Dick Cavett – on an ABC show shortened to 45 minutes from the usual hour and a half by Monday Night Football – welcomed Husbands director John Cassavetes together with the film’s co-stars Ben Gazzara and Peter Falk. From the get-go, it was a triple-shot challenge for Cavett, who handled it with amazing wit and grace.

The host was especially funny before and after the commercial breaks, at one point welcoming back “our friends on the Emmy Award committee” and pleading, at the end, that his guests “go do the same things to Griffin and Carson.” At another point in the program, Cavett walked off stage, with Falk taking over as interviewer and the host finally returning to the sounds of the audience chorus ‘We Want Dick!’

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Veteran New Yorker Cartoonist Charles Barsotti Dies at 80

Charles Barsotti, who had drawn more than 1,300 cartoons for The New Yorker, has died. He was 80 years old. According to his daughter, Kerry Scott, Barsotti had been diagnosed with brain cancer last year, and died at home in Kansas City.

Barsotti began contributing to The New Yorker in the 1960s, and was added to the magazine’s staff full-time in 1970. His cartoons became known for their simplistic approaches to complicated subjects, such as politics and religion.

“You know, he drew cartoons about philosophy and kings, and I sort of think he was the philosopher king of cartoonists,” Robert Mankoff, The New Yorker’s cartoon editor, said. “Really. He asked the big questions. Why are we here? What should we do? In a very simple way which didn’t come down on any sort of answers, but says part of being human is just not ignoring these questions.”

Morning Media Newsfeed: Casey Kasem Dies at 82 | FCC to Investigate Netflix Dispute

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Casey Kasem, Wholesome Voice of Pop Radio, Dies at 82 (NYT)
Casey Kasem, a disc jockey who never claimed to love rock ’n’ roll but who built a long and lucrative career from it, creating and hosting one of radio’s most popular syndicated pop music shows, American Top 40, died on Sunday in a hospital in Gig Harbor, Wash. He was 82. Mashable Kasem had Parkinson’s disease and dementia. His children took him off life support in a Washington hospice this week. HuffPost Kasem will be remembered as the “the king of countdowns.” He was best known for his work on American Top 40, which he hosted from 1970 to 1988, and again from 1998 until 2004, when he passed the job on to Ryan Seacrest. Kasem was also a talented voice-over artist, most famously voicing Scooby-Doo’s pal, Shaggy. THR Kasem said he wanted to be the “voice of the guy next door,” and his style was to accent the positive, considering each one of the hits a major accomplishment for each act involved. He never focused on the negative, such as a big drop-off for a particular song, and remained family-friendly. His shows also tugged at the heartstrings with such elements as “Long Distance Dedications.” Variety Kemal Amin Kasem was born in Detroit to parents who were Lebanese Druze immigrants. He graduated from Wayne State University. Kasem got his start in radio during the Korean War, working for Armed Forces Radio. Kasem was inducted into the National Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame in 1985 and the National Radio Hall of Fame in 1992.

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Singer-Songwriter Ponders New York vs. LA

Remember the concept album? It still exists. Gabriel Kahane‘s latest, The Ambassador, is all about Los Angeles, with each track sung from the perspective of a specific Lalaland address. On the the title track, for exampe, Kahane embraces the POV of a doorman at the bygone Ambassador Hotel.

GabrielKahanePic

The singer-songwriter has also penned a fun New Yorker essay on the age-old dismissal of Los Angeles by New Yorkers. He starts off with a good theory as to why that is:

The notion that LA is a place unsuitable for serious thought is one many of us cling to in order to justify the cramped and sometimes squalid conditions in which we live in New York…

I spent six years writing music (which, for most people, requires silence) in a small apartment one floor above a middle-aged couple whose domestic disputes frequently reached decibel levels that would not have been out of place on a tarmac at J.F.K. And there was the time when, working as a bartender, I watched my boss at a dingy midtown bar douse his genitals in vodka in order to “sterilize” himself after a basement assignation with a female patron, only to turn around and fire me an hour later for “overpouring” and thus wasting his liquor. I told myself that these were the wages of true artistry.

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Roger Angell Chats with M Magazine

Nice interview feature from Sridhar Pappu for the summer issue of men’s luxury quarterly M.

RogerAngellPicHe caught up with 93-year-old New Yorker editor and writer Roger Angell to talk reader response to February 2014 piece “This Old Man,” Angell’s imminent receipt of the J. G. Taylor Spink Award and this man’s august New Yorker genealogy:

The magazine is more or less a part of him: He knew it well even as a child, given that his mother, Katharine White, was its literary editor from its founding year of 1925 to 1960, and his stepfather, renowned essayist and Charlotte’s Web author E. B. White, joined its staff in 1927 and stayed on as a contributor into the early eighties.

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America’s Largest-Circulation Classical Music Magazine Has a New Publisher

Diane M. Silberstein OPERA NEWS Metropolitan Opera Guild, Inc.Here’s an atypical career trajectory: from Playboy magazine to Opera News.

Diane Silberstein started May 9 as publisher of the Metropolitan Opera Guild’s 78-year-old magazine. In addition to previously being the publisher at Playboy, Silberstein has also served as publisher of Elle, The New Yorker and Yahoo! Internet Life magazine. She began her career at Glamour and was part of the launch team for Allure. From this week’s announcement:

“Diane’s in-depth understanding of the media and publishing worlds is an invaluable asset,” said Richard J. Miller, Jr., president of the Metropolitan Opera Guild. “Her innovative leadership will guide Opera News into an exciting new era in its long and distinguished life.”

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Deconstructing Jill Abramson’s Sudden Departure

new-york-times-logoHere’s the first of what will be many bits of anecdotal evidence submitted in an effort to decipher the abrupt exit of New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson. It comes from a New Yorker item by Ken Auletta:

Several weeks ago, I’m told, Abramson discovered that her pay and her pension benefits as both executive editor and, before that, as managing editor were considerably less than the pay and pension benefits of Bill Keller, the male editor whom she replaced in both jobs.

“She confronted the top brass,” one close associate said, and this may have fed into the management’s narrative that she was “pushy,” a characterization that, for many, has an inescapably gendered aspect.

Another source however told Auletta that the salary gap had been closed,* leaving only a pension disparity tied to the pair’s differing lengths of NYT service.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Jansing Promoted | CBS Crew Detained | News Corp. Buys Harlequin

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Chris Jansing Named Senior White House Correspondent for NBC News (TVNewser)
Changes are coming to NBC’s Washington bureau. NBC News president Deborah Turness has named Chris Jansing as the new senior white house correspondent and Peter Alexander as national correspondent. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Jansing, who will report primarily for NBC Nightly News, will relocate from New York to Washington and will stop hosting her MSNBC show Jansing & Co. The network said her replacement will be announced in the coming weeks. Variety Both Jansing and Alexander will work as part of a unit that also comprises Chuck Todd, the NBC News political director and chief White House correspondent, and Kristen Welker, who will continue to report for NBC Nightly News and Today. HuffPost It will be the latest of a string of changes at that network, which has recently reshuffled its daytime lineup and added Ronan Farrow and Joy Reid to its roster. Deadline Hollywood Jansing joined NBC News in June 1998, and has also anchored Jansing & Co. on MSNBC since October 2010. She anchored MSNBC’s coverage of the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11 as the events unfolded, extensively covered several presidential campaigns for both NBC News and MSNBC and hosted a series of reports called Battleground America.

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