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Posts Tagged ‘The New Yorker’

New Yorker Publishes Lena Dunham Book Excerpt

lena_dunham--300x300Not That Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells You What She’s ‘Learned,” the Lena Dunham memoir, doesn’t hit book stores until September 30. Luckily for Dunham fans (and Dunham haters!) The New Yorker has published an excerpt, which Dunham described as “about the therapists who raised me.”

“I am used to appointments: allergist, chiropractor, tutor,” writes Dunham. “All I want is to feel better, and that overrides the fear of something new, something reserved for people who are crazy. Plus, both my parents have therapists, and I feel more like my parents than like anybody else.”

The piece is titled “Difficult Girl.” You can enjoy it or hate it — or secretly enjoy it but publicly hate it — by clicking here.

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The New Yorker’s Ferguson Cover

The New Yorker is the latest magazine to publish a moving cover dedicated to the Michael Brown shooting — and the aftermath — in Ferguson, Missouri.

Eric Drooker, who created the illustration, said the events brought forth disturbing memories:

As a resident of Manhattan’s Lower East Side, I witnessed the blurring distinctions between the police and military during the Tompkins Square riots of the eighties. I’ll never forget the day the N.Y.P.D. showed up in a military tank to evict nonviolent squatter friends from buildings on Avenue B and Thirteenth Street, where I grew up. This incident triggered a vivid childhood memory of the police driving a similar armored tank on East Fourteenth street, in 1968, to quell possible ‘disturbances’ after Martin Luther King was assassinated.

Details Taps New Publisher

You can’t win them all.

DrewSchutteLinkedInAs we reported last month, WWD summarized the rumor mill of names being mentioned for the vacant Details publisher slot. Nowhere in that summary was the individual today disclosed. From Keith J. Kelly‘s report:

Condé Nast on Monday chose a Web-focused executive from its ranks as the new publisher at Details — signalling it wants to jump start the title’s nascent digital efforts.

Drew Schutte, a former publisher of Wired and The New Yorker, who was most recently executive vice president and chief integration officer at the publishing giant, replaces Kevin Martinez, who was lured to Maxim a month ago.

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New Yorker Photo Editor: ‘It’s About More Than the Picture That Gets Published’

Seattle native Whitney C. Johnson is back in her hometown to give a lecture at the Seattle Art Museum.

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Ahead of the museum talk, she spoke via telephone with The Stranger visual arts writer Jen Graves about her seven years on the job as one of The New Yorker‘s team of photo editors. At one point during the informative Q&A, Johnson – now the director of photography – outlined her admirable big-picture M.O.:

“I try to assign photographers assignments that can contribute to a person’s body of work. Thomas Struth had a show in New York recently, and one of the images he shot on assignment for us. Moises Saman was recently showing me the book dummy for his work from the Middle East over the last five years or so, and I’d say about 20 percent of the pictures he’s shot on assignment for us.”

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Latest Yahoo Travel ‘Smackdown’ Takes Aim at New York

In the same vein as our weekly Cover Battles, Yahoo Travel likes to pit two destinations against each other under the heading of a “Smackdown.” We couldn’t help but take special notice of this week’s duel, as it throws Chicago and New York into the ring.

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Up first to make Chicago’s case is freelance travel writer Bill Fink. At one point, he drags our most august weekly magazine into the conversation:

New York City’s myopic, self-absorbed viewpoint is best seen in the famous New Yorker magazine cover created to compensate for its citizens’ miserable quality of life. Bad news for New Yorkers: Unless you’re a billionaire hedge-fund manager, you’re living in an unaffordable, closet-size apartment, scurrying to work on packed streets like rats in a maze.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Time Warner Plays Defense | Netflix Hits 50 Million Subscribers

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Time Warner Cancels Shareholders’ Ability to Call Special Board Meeting, Guards Against Fox Acquisition (NYT / DealBook)
Time Warner is playing defense. On Monday, the company amended its corporate bylaws and removed a provision that allowed shareholders to call a special board meeting. In a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Time Warner said the change was effective immediately. Variety The media company’s board approved a measure to temporarily prevent a fraction of shareholders, some 15 percent, from forcing a vote on 21st Century Fox’s $85 per-share offer, according to public filings. The so-called special meeting provision may be re-instated at the company’s 2015 shareholders meeting. Deadline Hollywood The fear was that Rupert Murdoch — or anyone — could have tried to stampede short-term investors into accepting a deal even if the board concluded that it would not serve their long-term interests. Time Warner shares were down 1.6 percent in post-market trading following disclosure of the change. THR Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox has bid about $80 billion to acquire Time Warner, but Time Warner’s board and CEO Jeffrey Bewkes have rejected the proposal. Some analysts predict that 21st Century Fox will eventually offer $100 a share for Time Warner. The conglomerate’s stock has climbed 23 percent in the past week on such speculation, and Monday it closed at $87.36. TVNewser People familiar with the original $80 billion proposal that was rejected said if 21st Century Fox took over Time Warner, it would sell CNN to prevent antitrust issues stemming from Fox News and CNN’s direct competitor relationship.

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The New Yorker Launches Revamped Website

The New Yorker’s website has a brand new look. The revamped newyorker.com has a good amount of white space — which makes reading easier — and highlights one featured article on the homepage and each subsection.

The updated newyorker.com is less difficult to navigate than the previous version. Each subsection is listed at the top of the page and new content is clearly marked under a section titled “The Latest.” The new site, according to a note from the glossy’s editors, gives staffers more flexibility when reacting to the news of the day.

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The New Yorker to Launch New Paywall

Beginning July 21, The New Yorker’s content — dating back to 2007 — will be available for all to read online. We suggest you take advantage of this, because in three months, the glossy is closing everything back up; sealed behind a new, metered paywall.

The New York Times reports that the motivation behind opening up newyorker.com was to find out how readers interacted with the site, and then use that data to construct the revamped paywall. The magazine also hopes to add subscribers via the promotion.

We’re excited about this idea, because in the past, it was almost pointless to go to The New Yorker’s site unless you were a subscriber. You never really knew which articles would be available to non-subscribers, and the selection was always minimal.

David Remnick, the magazine’s editor, admitted as much. He told the Times that their method for selecting magazine content that was available online was “awkward” and had “long since outlived its conception.”

Morning Media Newsfeed: Coulson Gets 18 Months | SiriusXM Fires Opie & Anthony‘s Cumia

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Andy Coulson Gets 18 Months in Tabloid Phone Hacking (NYT)
Andy Coulson, a former senior editor in Rupert Murdoch’s news empire and a onetime adviser to Prime Minister David Cameron, was sentenced on Friday to 18 months in prison for his part in the phone hacking scandal that convulsed Britain’s press, police and political elite and inspired calls for tighter regulation of journalists. HuffPost / AP Coulson was convicted June 24 after an eight-month trial triggered by a tabloid-wrongdoing scandal that led Murdoch to shut down the News of The World in 2011. Another former editor, Rebekah Brooks, and four others were acquitted. The Guardian The offense carries a maximum sentence of two years’ imprisonment, but Coulson received a discount of several months for his previous good character. He could be out in less than nine months because, as a non-violent offender, he is required to serve just half his sentence. THR Three other former News of the World staffers and one private investigator who hacked phones for the paper also pleaded guilty to hacking and also received their sentences Friday. They are former news desk editors Greg Miskiw, James Weatherup and Neville Thurlbeck, as well as Glenn Mulcaire, a private investigator who was used for hacking. Miskiw and Thurlbeck were sentenced to six months each, Weatherup got a suspended sentence of four months, and Mulcaire was given a suspended sentence of six months. Variety Coulson faces a retrial along with former royals editor Clive Goodman on separate charges that they made illegal payments to police officers to obtain royal phone directories. Over a period of more than a decade, journalists at the now-shuttered Sunday paper listened in on thousands of voicemails belonging to celebrities, politicians and crime victims.

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Dick Cavett Revisits Alcohol-Soaked ‘Worst Show’

In the brand new book about The Tonight Show with Jay Leno by show producer David Berg, one of the many memorable guest anecdotes involves how Quentin Tarantino in 2003 hit “The Jay Bar” cart a little too hard and paid the incoherent, frenetic price.

Reading about that brought back memories of an even more epic artifact from the annals of late night slosh. Back in September 1970, Dick Cavett – on an ABC show shortened to 45 minutes from the usual hour and a half by Monday Night Football – welcomed Husbands director John Cassavetes together with the film’s co-stars Ben Gazzara and Peter Falk. From the get-go, it was a triple-shot challenge for Cavett, who handled it with amazing wit and grace.

The host was especially funny before and after the commercial breaks, at one point welcoming back “our friends on the Emmy Award committee” and pleading, at the end, that his guests “go do the same things to Griffin and Carson.” At another point in the program, Cavett walked off stage, with Falk taking over as interviewer and the host finally returning to the sounds of the audience chorus ‘We Want Dick!’

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