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The New Yorker Illustrates New York’s Obscene Income Inequality With Epic Graphic

New York City’s income inequality between neighborhoods rollercoasters from each subway stop. Get off at Chambers St., and you’re averaging $205,192. Hop off at Kingsbridge Rd., and you’re at $18,610 — likely dipping below the poverty line.

On Tuesday, the New Yorker‘s graphics team released an interactive tool that allows you to see just how all-over-the-place the average income is per household at each station on the MTA’s 21 subway lines.

“It’s particularly bad in New York City—according to recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau, if the borough of Manhattan were a country,” the magazine explains in its “Idea of the Week,” “the income gap between the richest twenty per cent and the poorest twenty per cent would be on par with countries like Sierra Leone, Namibia, and Lesotho.”

Wow. This makes Gawker writer Hamilton Nolan‘s “Hello from the Underclass” series on unemployment stories all the more dismal.

Click over to the interactive graphic to check it out for yourself.

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