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Posts Tagged ‘Liu Xiaobo’

Chen Wei & Chen Xi Imprisoned

Chinese writers Chen Wei and Chen Xi were both given long prison sentences over the holidays. The PEN American Center denounced the action, calling it “an eerie replay of the 2009 trial of Liu Xiaobo.”

Both writers published digital essays criticizing China’s political system and government activities. Wei was charged with inciting subversion and sentenced to eleven-years’ imprisonment. Xi was charged with the same “crime” and sentenced to ten-years’ imprisonment.

PEN president Kwame Anthony Appiah gave this statement in the release: “Once more the Chinese regime has chosen to darken the holiday season with a reminder of its fear of independent thought. We salute the extraordinary courage of those Chinese, like Chen Wei, Chen Xi, and Liu Xiaobo, who love their country enough to risk long-term incarceration for speaking out against a government that betrays the hopes of the Chinese people every day.” What do you think?

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Graywolf Press to Publish Liu Xiaobo Poetry Collection

Graywolf Press has acquired the world rights (excluding Chinese languages) to a poetry collection by imprisoned Chinese poet,  Liu Xiaobo. Today the poet received the Nobel Peace Prize, but could not accept the award in person.

Here’s more from the release: “June Fourth Elegies is divided into twenty sections, each section an ‘anniversary offering’ for the June 4, 1989 massacre at Tiananmen Square. Xiaobo was one of the leading activists of the non-violent protest at Tiananmen, and was one of the architects of the Charter 08 manifesto. Much of Liu’s writing has been confiscated due to his many imprisonments for his public criticism of the Chinese government; he has not been able to publish June Fourth Elegies in China.”

Poet Jeffrey Yang will translate the collection. Literary agent Peter Bernstein negotiated the deal with Jeffrey Shotts and publisher Fiona McCrae. The press plans to release the collection in 2012.

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Harvard University Press to Publish Nobel Peace Prize Winner Liu Xiaobo

Harvard University Press will translate works by Chinese author Liu Xiaobo, this year’s Nobel Peace Prize winner.  Publication for the untitled anthology is set for 2012.

Xiaobo (pictured) writes poetry, essays, and social commentary about political reform in China. The academic press has enlisted Perry Link (chancellorial chair in teaching across disciplines at the University of California, Riverside) to  supervise a translation team. Link had this statement: “Until he won the Nobel Peace Prize, Liu Xiaobo was little known in the West. This collection offers to the reader of English the full range of his astute and penetrating analyses of culture, politics, and society in China today.”

So far, Xiaobo has served almost two years of his 11-year prison sentence for “inciting subversion of state power.”  Liu Xia, his wife, has been put under house arrest.

Nobel Prize Winning Authors Who Didn’t Win for Lit

This year’s Nobel Prize in Literature went to Mario Vargas Llosa who beat the odds and captured the tax-free $2 million award. The Huffington Post rounded-up seven authors who have won the Nobel prize in categories other than literature.

The winners include Barack Obama, Nelson Mandela, the Dalai Lama, Martin Luther King Jr., Elie Wiesel, James D. Watson, and Joseph Stiglitz. In 1993, Mandela shared the prize with Frederik Willem de Klerk for their work towards ending apartheid. Mandela has also published his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom. Last year, Obama was honored with the prize; he has written three books: Dreams of My Father, The Audacity of Hope, and the forthcoming picture book, Of Thee I Sing.

Chinese author Liu Xiaobo joined this inspirational group, winning this year’s Nobel Peace Prize. The judges honored the writer “for his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China.”

Liu Xiaobo Wins Nobel Peace Prize

Imprisoned Chinese writer Liu Xiaobo and former Independent Chinese PEN Center board has won the Nobel Peace Prize “for his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China.”

The Chinese author was arrested two years ago for the crime of ‘inciting subversion of state power’ by writing about political reform in China. On Christmas Day 2009, a Beijing court sentenced Xiaobo to 11-years in prison and and “two years’ deprivation of political rights” for subversion in his writings. His trial lasted hours.

In a conversation with a Chinese artist, Xiaobo explained why he wrote, despite government control: “From a certain point of view, what with artists dealing with so much suffering, and a nation facing so many tragic incidents, I feel that Chinese artists have deliberately held back. To express things in their reality would be to invite censorship and to ultimately lose one’s market – it’s a conflict of interests. So much accumulated suffering yet no corresponding artistic record – what a tragedy. Whether its in terms of politics or in terms of an individual life, that no such work exists to capture the totality of the moment is sad, very, very sad.”

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Happy New Year from GalleyCat

GalleyCat would like to wish all our readers have a safe and happy holiday. We will be taking a break over the long weekend, but we will be back next week with Consumer Electronics Show coverage and all the news you need to survive 2010.

In the meantime, go visit our digitally obsessed sibling eBookNewser for some year-end e-reading device news. If that’s not enough, check out our collection of Best Writing Music of 2009 lists and our annual Pet Parade. And keep imprisoned Chinese author Liu Xiaobo in your thoughts over the holiday-watch a number of great writers support Xiaobo in that GalleyCat video.

Finally, include your New Year writing resolutions in the comments section. We’ll round up the responses in 2010.

Don DeLillo and A.M. Homes Protest Imprisonment of Chinese Author Liu Xiaobo

On this snowy New Year’s Eve morning, a team of famous PEN America members gathered on the steps of the New York Public Library to protest the 11-year sentence of Chinese writer Liu Xiaobo for the crime of subversion.

As you can see by this exclusive GalleyCat video, the list of speakers at this dramatic event included: E.L. Doctorow, Don DeLillo, A.M. Homes, and Edward Albee.

Here’s more from the release: “There are currently almost 1,000 writers on PEN’s list of writers and journalists in danger because of their work. Leading the list is Liu Xiaobo, one of China’s most prominent writers and a past president and member of the Independent Chinese PEN Center, which is doing on-the-ground PEN advocacy in China. Liu was convicted of ‘inciting subversion of state power’ for co-authoring ‘Charter 08,’ a petition calling for political and human rights reforms in China, and for seven sentences in five articles he published on the internet that are critical of Chinese authorities.”

Chinese Author Expected to Be Sentenced on Christmas Day

Yesterday Chinese writer Liu Xiaobo pleaded not guilty to subversion charges in a three hour trial, the PEN American Center reports. The organization anticipates that the Beijing No. 1 Intermediate People’s Court will release a verdict tomorrow.

On December 8, 2008, Chinese authorities arrested Independent Chinese PEN Center board member and author Liu Xiaobo. Since his imprisonment, supporters around the world have petitioned for his release. According to the PEN American Center, the Chinese author was arrested for the crime of ‘inciting subversion of state power’ by writing about political reform in China.

Xiaobo is speaking in the video above. In 1989, he joined the pro-democracy protests at Tiananmen Square. Seven years later Xiaobo was sentenced to three years in a labor camp for writing another document that criticized Chinese government’s policies.

PEN American Center’s director of Freedom to Write and International Programs Larry Siems had this statement: “It is certainly not reassuring that the court is planning on announcing the verdict on Christmas Day, when they undoubtedly hope the world’s attention will be turned away … But the world is watching this story closely with the hope that Liu will be released according to Chinese laws guaranteeing freedom of expression. We are looking to the court to follow the rule of law.”