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Last Chance: Write a Haiku, Win a Pass to the Hopscotch Design Festival

hopscotch

Time is running out to be tersely poetic and craft the haiku that will win you a free pass to the Hopscotch Design Festival, which runs September 3-4 in Raleigh, North Carolina. The designtastic new companion to the Hopscotch Music Festival boasts a speaker line-up that includes OMA’s Shohei Shigematsu, Kai-Uwe Bergmann of Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), Casey Caplowe of GOOD, Alexander Isley, and other inspiring figures in the worlds of graphic design, user experience design, urban planning, technology, architecture, and more.

To be eligible to win one of the two run-of-the-festival passes ($150 each) that we’re giving away thanks to Moo.com, write a haiku—we’ll take the standard five-seven-five syllables—about the Hopscotch Design Festival presenter or session you’re most interested in seeing. E-mail your minimalist poem to unbeige@mediabistro.com with the subject “HOPSCOTCH” by 10 p.m. EST tonight (Wednesday, August 27th). Winners will be notified within 24 hours.

Mediabistro Course

InDesign for Writers and Editors

InDesign for Writers and EditorsStarting September 4, become proficient in InDesign in our hands-on workshop! Nicole Alleyne, a multimedia designer, will give you the knowledge of Adobe InDesign for editing your projects.You'll learn how to use the toolbar and palettes, create and edit style sheets, import images, add colors, change colors, and more. Register now!

Mark Your Calendar: Hopscotch Design Festival

passesPerhaps you’ve heard of the Hopscotch Music Festival, which Spin likens to “South by Southwest minus the infestation of industry vermin and the clumsy bluster of corporate partyzillas.” Now in its fifth year, the Raleigh, North Carolina-based bandstravaganza is expanding its disciplinary boundaries—to the world of design. The inaugural Hopscotch Design Festival will take place September 3-4 in downtown Raleigh, with a speaker line-up that includes OMA’s Shohei Shigematsu, Kai-Uwe Bergmann of Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), Casey Caplowe of GOOD, Alexander Isley, and other inspiring figures in the worlds of graphic design, user experience design, urban planning, technology, architecture, and more.

Want to go? Thanks to Moo.com, we’re giving away two run-of-the-festival passes (valued at $150 each). To be eligible to win one, write a haiku about the Hopscotch Design Festival presenter or session you’re most interested in seeing. E-mail your minimalist poem to unbeige@mediabistro.com with the subject “HOPSCOTCH” by 10 p.m. EST on Wednesday, August 27th. Winners will be notified within 24 hours.

Favorite Thing: Jack Headphone Stand

Nancy Lazarus journeyed to the Javits Center for the summer 2014 edition of NY NOW, the Market for Home + Lifestyle (formerly NYIGF) as the UnBeige judge for the Bloggers’ Choice Awards, which highlights “urgent, odd, and delightful design” from among the more than 150 exhibitors in the Accent on Design category. Here’s her pick.

jackWhile scouring the Accent on Design aisles of the NY NOW trade show, which wraps up today, we came across a product that literally stood out: the Jack Headphone Stand, our choice for the Bloggers’ Choice awards. Designed by Brooklyn-based ModProducts (a.k.a. ModKo), the Jack Headphone Stand is the optimal storage and recharging station for headphones and small mobile devices when it’s high time for a digital break. It’s made from polypropylene and rubber in orange, yellow, white, or gray, to fit the color scheme of any desk or night table. All wires remain hidden behind a cable pass-through, leaving you with a clutter-free space. The Jack will make its first stand at retail in time for the holiday shopping season.

Have a suggestion for our next Favorite Thing? E-mail unbeige@mediabistro.com.

Now Read This: David Zwirner’s Pop-Up Bookstore Returns

zwirnerbooksWhen the good people at David Zwirner e-mailed us with news of the gallery’s fifth annual summer pop-up bookstore, we briefly considered keeping the news to ourselves, so great is our obsession with admiration for many artists in the Zwirner stable (Luc Tuymans! Marlene Dumas! Richard Serra!). Somehow, we’ve managed to suppress our selfish impulses to let you know that for two weeks only—right this minute through Friday, August 1—Zwirner will offer up deals galore on a selection of rare and out-of-print books, signed artist catalogues, DVDs, and more. The David Zwirner Pop-Up Bookstore, hosted with ARTBOOK | D.A.P., will be open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and you know we’ll be there bright and early to ensure first dibs on anything and everything related to Michaël Borremans. OK, and we’ll probably hoard all the Neo Rauch stuff, too. Because all’s fair in love and pop-up bookstores.

The David Zwirner Pop-Up Bookstore is located at 525 West 19th Street in NYC.

Frieze Taps Barber and Osgerby’s Universal Design Studio to Design London Fair

frieze art fairNow in its eleventh year, Frieze London is getting a new look. This year’s fair, which runs October 15-18 in leafy Regent’s Park, will be designed by Universal Design Studio. The creative consultancy, founded in 2011 by designers Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby to focus on architecture and interiors, takes over from fellow Londoners Carmody Groarke, who handled the fair’s architectural aspects (read: supercool megatent) for the last three years. Frieze has previously employed Caruso St John (2008-2010), Jamie Fobert (2006–2007) and David Adjaye (2003-2005).

“The architecture and design of the fair have always been an important part of our identity,” say Frieze founders Amanda Sharp and Matthew Slotover. “This year we were drawn to Universal in particular due to their work on interiors and focus on materials. As some of the best designers working in this area, their lateral thinking has been demonstrated by some of their great furniture and even their design for the Olympic torch. We’re really looking forward to them bringing this sensibility to Frieze.” Among Universal’s recent projects are Google Web Lab at London’s Science Museum, exhibition design for Vitra’s Vitrahaus exhibition, and both the interior and exterior of the London outpost of the Ace Hotel.

Chicago Getting Its Own Architecture Biennial

chicago archWatch out, Venezia. The Windy City is getting a biennial of its own. Announced this week, the Chicago Architecture Biennial—billed as the largest international survey of contemporary architecture in North America—is set to open October 1, 2015 in and around the Chicago Cultural Center. The three-month-long event, presented by the City of Chicago and the Graham Foundation, will be funded through private donations (BP has already chipped in $2.5 million).

“Chicago is the birthplace of modernism in architecture and every architect in the world knows our city’s history of innovation in the field through the work of architects such as Louis Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Mies van der Rohe,” says Graham Foundation director Sarah Herda, who will serve as artistic director of the Biennial with architect, writer, and curator Joseph Grima. “The Biennial will place Chicago, once again, at the forefront of the architectural imagination.”
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Mark Your Calendar: Dwell on Design L.A.

dwell on design

Just two weeks stand between you and Dwell on Design, a veritable feast of modern design in the form of thousands of products, oodles of presentations, modern home tours, and demonstrations galore. This year’s West Coast ideas- and inspiration-fest takes place June 20-22 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Among the highlights in store is a keynote address by designer Stephen Burks, who will discuss his passion for craft and how to marry personal goals with marketable design, and a series of panels, including those that focus on designing L.A. The crew from Commune DesignPam Shamshiri, Ramin Shamshiri, Roman Alonso, and Steven Johanknecht—will take the stage to talk revitalization ranging from major residential multiuse projects to the recently opened Ace Hotel. And we hear that Coolhaus is whipping up a new treat, the Dwell ice cream sandwich, especially for the show. Ready to register? Save $5 on your show pass by entering the code: UNBEIGE.

Biennale Bling: Rem Koolhaas and Swarovski Sparkle in Venice

(Gilbert McCarragher)
(Photo: Gilbert McCarragher)

The long-awaited Rem Koolhaas-curated Venice Architecture Biennale is upon us. Along with a newly cohesive approach to the national pavilions, in which the 65 participating nations each address a “key moment from a century of modernization,” and the central “Elements of Architecture” exhibition (spoiler alert: “It is nothing to do with design,” Koolhaas explained yesterday), there is “Monditalia,” a multidisciplinary portrait of Italy in the form of 82 films, 41 architectural projects, and a merger of architecture with the Biennale’s dance, music, theater, and film sections. Mamma mia!

Visitors enter Monditalia through a dramatic illuminated archway, which is saved from smacking of Vegas or Disney by its setting in the augustly industrial Arsenale. Dubbed Luminaire, the sparkling facade—spanning nearly 66 feet in length—was created in collaboration with Swarovski using thousands of colored light bulbs and a generous dusting (read: 33 pounds worth) of Swarovski crystals, all encrusting an elaborate wooden frame. Koolhaas describes what lies beyond the gate as dealing with “the current state of Italy, between treasure and crisis, knowledge and controversies, history and politics.”

Collective Design Fair Throws a Few Curves

The Collective Design Fair returned to the Frieze-time fray this year, and we sent Nancy Lazarus to check out the new venue and the many curvaceous works on view.

Galerie BSL
A screen by Taher Chemirik was the undulating centerpiece of Galerie BSL’s booth at Collective.

International in scope yet moderate in scale, New York’s Collective Design Fair debuted last year “to provide new commercial and educational platforms for vintage and contemporary design,” according to Steven Learner, the fair’s creative director. The sophomore edition ran from May 8-11 in a new venue—Skylight at Moynihan Station—and added to existing strengths in Scandinavian design and ceramics with a new focus on wearable art. We chatted with some of the 36 exhibitors and joined a tour led by Cooper-Hewitt curator Sarah Coffin to round up five highlights.

Joseph Walsh, Enignum Canopy Bed, 3-562x748, 2013, Courtesy of Todd Merrill Studio ContemporaryTodd Merrill 20th Century Studio Contemporary, New York City: “A tour de force of woodworking” was Coffin’s apt description of Irish designer Joseph Walsh‘s Enignum Canopy Bed (at right), since it consists of ribbons of olive ash wood positioned on a raised platform. Walsh explained the craftsmanship involved in the accompanying materials: “In the Enignum series of works I have stripped wood into thin layers, manipulating and reconstructing them into free form compositions. The title derives from the Latin words ‘enigma’ (mystery) and ‘lignum’ (wood).”

Sienna Patti Gallery, Lenox, Massachusetts:Jacqueline Lillie‘s beaded jewelry plays off of Wiener Werkstätte, but is updated to be contemporary,” said Coffin. The French-born, Vienna-based designer works with materials including glass beads, corian, and stainless steel. “In addition to form and function, I also insist on flexibility,” Lillie has said. “That’s essential because all good jewelry should adapt to the wearer and be an extension of that person’s character.”
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(Eye) Candy: Oscar Murillo, Kara Walker Prepare for Sweet Shows

chocomelos

Move over, Willy Wonka. New York will soon be treated to creative confections from West Chelsea to the Brooklyn waterfront. The sweetness starts Thursday as Columbian-born, London-based Oscar Murillo transforms David Zwirner gallery into a candy factory churning out Chocmelos: chocolate-covered marshmallows sheathed in silvery smiley faced wrappers. The solo exhibition, entitled “A Mercantile Novel,” is a collaboration with the confectionery wizards at Colombina, where Murillo’s mother once worked.

Over in Brooklyn, the industrial relic of the Domino Sugar Factory will be the backdrop for Kara Walker’s first large-scale public project: “A Subtlety or the Marvelous Sugar Baby an Homage to the unpaid and overworked Artisans who have refined our Sweet tastes from the cane fields to the Kitchens of the New World on the Occasion of the demolition of the Domino Sugar Refining Plant.” The expansive work “will respond to both the building and its history, exploring a radical range of subject matter and marking a major departure from her practice to date,” according to Creative Time, which is presenting the exhibition beginning May 10.
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