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Saatchi & Saatchi, Sydney Brings Out the ‘Bad in Dad’ for Toyota

Saatchi & Saatchi, Sydney has a new campaign for Toyota, entitled “Bad in Dad,” featuring one dad’s “bad” antics, attributed to his new Camry RZ.

Set to George Thorogood‘s ubiquitous “Bad to the Bone,” the dad is pictured using his leaf blower to blow leaves onto the neighbors yard (kind of funny), spraying his wife with a hose (cute) and embarrassing his son with the locked door trick as he picks him up from soccer practice (just plain cruel). The narrator at the end of the 45-second spot asserts that the new Camry will “bring out the bad in dad,” making the positioning of the vehicle as the motivator behind dad’s behavior explicit. While he may occasionally step over the line, the dad’s antics are mostly presented as the kind of things most of us think about doing, don’t, and then wish we had, which fits with the vehicle’s presentation as a sort of liberator. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Presentation Writing: Design and Delivery

Presentation Writing: Design and DeliveryLearn how to use storytelling techniques and visual content to create and deliver successful pitches and presentations! Starting August 6, Amanda Pacitti, the manager of learning at Time Inc., will teach you the best practices for presentations, from using software like Prezi and Powerpoint, to writing your script, and using images, audio, and video to drive your points. Register now! 

GSD&M Talks Protection for Radio Shack

GSD&M has a new back-to-school campaign for Radio Shack that makes good use of awkward humor to promote the brand’s protection plans.

In “The Talk” for example, a dad tells his son it’s time they had “the talk.” His son, horrified, listens as his father emphasizes the need to use protection. “I know you just want to get out and show it off, but you can’t just go swinging it around all willy-nilly trying to impress the girls.” He continues, “This glass is fragile. We’re covered though…” as the son looks greatly relieved. The spot’s use of innuendo in an awkward, easy to relate to situation makes it funny and memorable.

In the similarly suggestive “Laundry,” the tables are turned, and it’s the father who is made to feel awkward. We’ve included that spot, along with credits, after the jump. Read more

Droga5 Inspires for Under Armour

Droga5 takes Under Armour in a different direction with a new campaign called “I Will What I Want” aimed at women, starring Misty Copeland, a soloist with the American Ballet Theatre.

The spot opens with a young girl reading a rejection letter from a ballet academy over a sparse piano track as we see Copeland, poised on her taut ankles in a practice room. “…You lack the right feet, Achilles tendons, turnout, torso length and bust,” reads the girl. “You have the wrong body for ballet. And at 13, you are too old to be considered.” At this point, the soundtrack is set in motion and Copeland springs to life, twirling and gliding across the stage decked out in Under Armour. It is not until the conclusion of the 60-second spot that Copeland’s identity is revealed, her ultimate triumph over adversity implied.

Copeland, who is only the third African American soloist in the history of the American Ballet Theatre, told The New York Times “she never received a rejection letter that so starkly enumerated the reasons she was ill suited to be a ballet dancer,” but that “it accurately encapsulated the resistance she had faced throughout her career,” told from the time she was an adolescent that she had “the wrong body type” for ballet.

We see a lot of ads aim to be inspirational, but seldom do they succeed like “I Will What I Want,” which, unlike most spots with similar ambitions, doesn’t come across as forced or hokey. Coming from Under Armour, it’s an unexpected and refreshing new direction. Along with the broadcast spot, the campaign also includes digital and outdoor components, featuring Olympic skier Lindsey Vonn, tennis player Sloane Stephens and soccer player Kelley O’Hara in addition to Copeland. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

W+K Portland Declares Kevin Durant ‘The Baddest’ for Nike

“I don’t want to talk about who’s the best. I want to talk about who’s the baddest,” says Dick Gregory, while chilling at a basketball court at the beginning of W+K Portland’s new spot for Nike, “The Baddest.”

After listing some historical candidates for “the baddest,” such as Connie Hawkins, Artis Gilmore, George Gervin, Spencer Haywood, and David Thompson, the spot goes on to make a case for Kevin Durant as “the baddest” right now, through video footage and a variety of testimonials. The well-edited 60-second spot also spends some time explaining what the title of “the baddest” means, with comparisons including “bad like a good Thanksgiving meal,” “bad like money” and “bad like black coffee.” It all makes for a fun, very watchable spot, regardless of whether or not you agree with Nike and W+K’s  choice for the title of “the baddest.” Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

McKinney Channels Golden Girls for ESPN’s SEC Network

McKinney uses the song “Thank You For Being A Friend” (a cover of which is the theme song to the classic show Golden Girls) for a new campaign promoting the launch of ESPN’s SEC network for South Eastern Conference college sports, which launches August 14th.

The 30-second spot, “Animals,” features mascots from the conference, from Mississippi State’s “Bully” to Auburn’s “War Eagle” to Arkansas’ “Tusk.” It’s a simple approach, but between the loveable animal mascots and the Golden Girl nostalgia stoking musical selection, the spot is just plain likeable. And that’s coming from someone who couldn’t care less about college football. Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

Figliulo & Partners Rolls Out More ‘Framily’ for Sprint

Figliulo & Partners continues their slightly absurd “Framily” campaign for Sprint.

The agency launched the odd, nature-defying campaign back in March with a series of four ads. Now they’re back with two additions to the Frobinsons’ story. In “Count On It” (featured above) Chuck is out on the road with framily member Gordon (pronounced Gor-don) when his motorcycle breaks down. He calls his father (who, you might remember, is a hamster for some reason, voiced by Andrew Dice Clay), who he assures Gordon always picks up. Despite being in the middle of a frame of bowling with the wife, the father answers and rushes (or rolls) to the rescue. Yup, this campaign is still a frucking weird one.

Another spot, “Spin Off,” features Hamster Dad and NASCAR driver Jeff Gordon. Stick around for credits and that spot after the jump. Read more

DDB California Brings Back ‘Snap Into a Slim Jim’

DDB California brings back Slim Jim’s classic “Snap Into a Slim Jim” tagline in their latest campaign for the brand.

The new campaign targets the 18-25 crowd, most of whom are probably too young to remember the line as delivered by Randy Savage in its original incarnation. Still, it’s a memorable tagline and bringing it back will stoke nostalgia in the slightly older set. The 30-second spot reintroducing the line “Snap Into It,” unfortunately, is less memorable. With the only lines in the ad rhymes playing on meat sticks: bro sticks, pro sticks, hooray sticks, meat chicks, tree sticks, etc., the onscreen action focuses on one group of friends’ epic day, concluding with a goat party. “Snap into a goat party, snap into a slim jim,” the spot concludes. As you can imagine, it’s a tad on the goofy side, but the tagline’s return is a welcome one. A series of 15-second ads, also featuring the classic tagline, pit Slim Jims against a generic competitor in a series of ridiculous situations.

“It’s what people know and love about the brand,” group creative director Travis Parr told Adweek, reffering to the old tagline. “ConAgra worried it had too much baggage or might make them seem old. But they finally decided it was cool.” Credits and the 15-second “Possum” after the jump. Read more

DDB Examines Downside to Self-Driving Cars for Centraal Beheer Achmea

DDB & Tribal Worldwide, Amsterdam tackles the issue of self-driving cars in their latest spot for Dutch insurance company Centraal Beheer Achmea.

The spot at first appears to be a promo for the self-driving car, but while the voiceover extolls the virtues of the technological innovations it leads to all kinds of disastrous accidents as people are distracted by the site of seeing a car with no driver. DDB’s spot crams a lot of slapstick into its 60 seconds, leading into the brand’s “Just Call Us” tagline.

Apparently the spot was correct in its assumption that a self-driving car would function as a large distraction to other drivers and passers-by. “The self-driving car is a hot topic at the moment and we saw it as a great opportunity for Centraal Beheer Achmea’s car insurance,” said Pol Hoenderboom, creative director at DDB & Tribal Worldwide. “Our own ‘self-driving car,’ by the way, did not survive the shoot unscathed. A local driver was so distracted by the situation that he drove straight into our ‘TV ad hero’ car parked on the location.” Stick around for credits after the jump. Read more

Oishii Creative Gets Gross for E!’s Botched

Creative agency Oishii Creative has a new spot for the debut of disturbing new E! series Botched, which “follows two plastic surgeons who attempt to fix cosmetic surgery disasters and counsel people who’ve become obsessed with having plastic surgeries.”

The 13-second promo combines imagery from the show with typography and a thematically linked soundtrack to examine how media (such as, uh, E!) bombards viewers with an idealized image of beauty that is unattainable. Presumably the show will explore the same themes, although we’re guessing not everyone who watches will tune in for the show’s message. While a bit on the cheesy side (the typography and music can be a bit much), the promo does fit with E!’s style, which is more than a little over the top. Be warned: even for 13 seconds, this stuff is not easy to stomach. Stay tuned for credits after the jump. Read more

Saatchi & Saatchi Creates Dual Spots Featuring NFL Rivals for Duracell

Saatchi & Saatchi created a pair of spots for Duracell featuring NFL rivals the Seattle Seahawks and San Francisco 49ers.

Both spots carry the same message: “When the game’s on the line, the NFL trusts Duracell Quantum to power their gameday communications.” The difference is that one spot presents this from the Seahawks’ perspective (on offense), while the other examines things from the 49ers’ point of view (on defense), leaving the ultimate outcome of a game defining play up in the air. After the viral success of  Saatchi & Saatchi New York’s “Power Your Game” spot back in January, these efforts feel a bit lightweight by comparison. Still, the different views of the same play approach is at least somewhat interesting and the continued NFL partnership should appeal to football fans.

Stick around for the 49ers version after the jump. Read more

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